Last season, Anniesa Hasibuan became the first designer ever to put hijabs on the runway at New York Fashion Week. And this season she made waves again by casting all immigrant models for the presentation of her Fall/Winter 2017 collection, which debuted February 14 at Skylight Clarkson Square.

Hasibuan has an elegant and powerful way of delivering a message. By putting hijabs and immigrant models on the runway with little fanfare (except from the press after the fact), she is very simply saying: Muslims belong here. Immigrants belong here, just like everyone and everything else that shows at NYFW. The statement is made via presence, and the clothes are left to make their own statement. Which they absolutely do.

Every single outfit was, simply put, the most. Sequins, velvet, pearls, embroidery. No matte surfaces. The collection aspired to royalty.

By Neilson Barnard/Getty Images for New York Fashion Week: The Shows

By Neilson Barnard/Getty Images for New York Fashion Week: The Shows

The color palette consisted of white, cream, peach, silver, gold, and black, mostly manifested in monochromatic outfits of several juxtaposing textures. The simplest outfits were a loose, sparkly tunic over dark velvet pants; most were a dress or tunic and pants with a long sheer cardigan or jacket over it. And when I say no matte surfaces, I'm not exaggerating: sheer pieces featured silver mesh overlay or dainty pearl detailing. Sequins were everywhere. Lots of skirts were big, full, and floor-length with flower-like gathering. It's fitting that the collection's theme was "drama."

By Neilson Barnard/Getty Images for New York Fashion Week: The Shows

By Neilson Barnard/Getty Images for New York Fashion Week: The Shows

And while Hasibuan uses volume expertly, making even the most fabric-heavy, layered outfits still look floaty and delicate, the slimmer silhouettes exuded modern royalty. Gold-threaded sweater and metallic pleated skirt pairings were cinched with obi belts. One long black dress with silver threading featured chiffon ruffles from the knee down, and one of the most interesting pieces was a menswear-inspired vest with a floor-length train. The simpler the outfit, the bolder the accessories—thick strings of pearls and beaded gloves, for example. Not a single outfit played it safe, and thank goodness for that. Hasibuan's woman is into luxury, into dressing up, and isn't afraid of being the most extra.