Francis Ford Coppola gave his blessing for a video game adaptation of his 1979 classic Apocalypse Now in the form of a Kickstarter for the game which is currently in development.

The team, which is comprised of artists from film studio American Zoetrope and former big-name RPG writers/directors, is seeking a minimum of $900,000 to get a PC-only version of the game to market. Some of the notable team members include Rob Auten, who was a head writer for the Gears of Wars, Battlefield, and Farcry franchises, and Lawrence Liberty, who's credited with directing Fallout: New Vegas and The Witcher.

Francis Ford Coppola, despite previously criticizing video game adaptations of his movies, like EA's disastrous Godfather, seemed to enthuasiastically endorse the game in a public statement."Forty years ago, I set out to make a personal art picture that could hopefully influence generations of viewers for years to come. Today, I'm joined by new daredevils, a team who want to make an interactive version of Apocalypse Now, where you are Captain Benjamin Willard amidst the harsh backdrop of the Vietnam War," Coppola said in a statement on the Kickstarter, "I've been watching videogames grow into a meaningful way to tell stories, and I'm excited to explore the possibilities for Apocalypse Now for a new platform and a new generation."

As of now the game is described as a psychedelic-horror RPG. It will immerse the player in the brutal world of wartime Vietnam and guide you through the infamous narrative arc of Apocalypse Now through the eyes of Captain Benjamin Willard, an American soldier tasked with the assassination of the brutal rogue Colonel Walter E. Kurtz.

According to the Kickstarter description, the game will not be so easily won through traditional shoot-em-up tactics as those "would not have lasted long in the real Vietnam." Instead, the player will have to make a series of calculated risks that will include empowering others to your bidding or maintaining strict secrecy and proceeding stealthily along. Given the writing talent and the potency of the original narrative, this game could be a great example of how more complicated morality systems in video games can have huge gameplay pay-offs.

So far the game is set to release in October 2020 on PC but the Kickstarter has an ascending set of fundraising benchmarks that could lead to an expanded soundtrack, expanded voicework, PS4 and XBOX One versions, and even a MACos release. One of the benchmarks included adapting the game to a fully immersive virtual reality experience with full voice-over acting if the fundraising hit $3 million.