Leah Remini better not be hoping for a dinner invitation from Tom Cruise, Kirstie Alley, or John Travolta anytime soon.

The 44-year-old is opening up about the craziness of her time in the Church of Scientology—and, that’s very likely to not sit well with those still committed to the controversial organization.

As Popdust previously reported, The King of Queens star caused a Scientology furor when she left the church in 2013, claiming she did so for the sake of her daughter.

Shortly after, Remini spoke to Ellen Degeneres about how she had been shunned by her former Scientology friends

"It's hard. We lost friends that can no longer talk to us who are still in the organization,” she said. “And these are friends that we've had for dozens of years. But I have great friends, other friends that are not in the church, that have stood by us. Our family is stronger, we're together and that's all I can ask for."

Remini is now discussing the subject further, talking about the demands the church allegedly puts on members, and how difficult it was for her to get the hell out.

"My mother was in Scientology my whole life,” she tells Oprah, during a recording of Winfrey’s Where Are They Now? “Most people don't know that we were raised in it. I didn't decide to get into it — I was brought into it by my mom."

"I don't think people know the amount of dedication it takes to be in this organization,” she goes on to claim. “I mean it was every day, three-and-a-half hours minimum, seven days a week usually. You know, I'm working most of my time, and then the other time was spent at the church, so minimal time is really spent with your family."

"I was at one of these hotels in Florida, and I saw my daughter swimming for the first time while I'm reading this thing [Scientology coursework]” Remini continues. “And a tear came down my face. And I was like, 'What am I doing?'"

Two years on from her exit, and Remini admits she’s still struggling to adjust to everyday life outside of the church.

"Our decision to leave the organization — it's not just something you get over,” she explains. “It's people and a lifestyle you've known all your life. It formed who I am, good and bad. It formed the way I think, good and bad. And so there's a lot of pain connected to it, there's a lot of healing.

“When you are raised in something, and you are taught to think a certain way, a lot of times you grow up thinking, 'That's the way I think.' I'm learning there's a new world out here, and there shouldn't be any kind of judgment toward somebody who has a belief system that is not yours."

Wise words indeed.

So, how is Scientology responding to the comments from their star defector—in a caring, compassionate, loving and forgiving manner, befitting that of a supposed religious organization? Or, in a nasty, angry, spiteful little-bitch bully way?

Hmmm….. that's a tough one…..

Well, here’s their statement:

Given Leah Remini's insatiable desire for attention, it comes as no surprise that for two years she has been incapable of moving on with her life and remains obsessed with shamelessly exploiting her former religion in a pathetic attempt to get publicity.

Ah! Scientology, keeping it classy since 1954…….