Demi Lovato's new single "Skyscraper" has been so successful, both in fan response and chart reaction--it was her first debut in the Billboard Hot 100--that why wouldn't she release a version in Spanish? That version, "Rascacielo," was previewed for fans along with her album's Sept. 20 release date. Listen below:

"Rascacielo" isn't the first Spanish-language single by Lovato, who has Mexican-American heritage--that would be "Lo Que Soy." a version of the Camp Rock song "This Is Me." Disney peer Selena Gomez did the same for "Who Says," re-recorded as "Dices."

All these songs have something in common--they're meant to empower teens or tweens, full of statements like "This is me / I'm exactly where I'm supposed to be now" or "Who says you're not perfect?" or, well, anything in "Skyscraper." They're driven less by their music than their words--particularly "Skyscraper," whose drama doesn't come from the instrumentation at all. So it's best to think of their Spanish-language counterparts not in terms of market share, but in terms of outreach. If even a few kids are moved or helped by hearing this song where the language barrier would otherwise stop them--alienation, teen and otherwise, is universal--then it's justified.