Lucy Rose's most recent album is arguably her most vulnerable yet.

The body of work, which was released last week, finds the singer with a new kind of comfort in her voice and confident in her versing. However, it was no short journey to get to this point. In fact, Rose had to do some travelling to find out why she was making music and if she should ever continue to release it publicly.

Lucy spoke with Popdust via email about what went on behind the scenes of Something's Changing.


You've been making and distributing music for a little while now. Why were you inspired to start writing and playing?

I used to love playing in the school orchestra. I played the drums and that was my first introduction to live music. Once I knew music was what I loved I saved up, bought a guitar and taught myself in my bedroom. It's hard to pin point exactly what inspired me to take those first steps, it was just something I was drawn to and it always felt right. When I fell in love with Joni Mitchell along with Joan Armatrading and Beth Orton I felt like I was guided by them and had a clearer vision of what sort of songs I wanted to write, ones with meaning and depth and that weren't afraid to say it how it is.

From what I've read, your latest album, Something's Changing, has a very interesting backstory that started with a trip to Latin America. Can you talk about that experience?

At the end of my last album campaign, I had a feeling of sadness. I wasn't enjoying being a part of the music industry, that it was making me feel like I wasn't good enough. I really lost my confidence and decided that maybe music was just for me, my happiness in playing at home and in my local pub, and I wasn't going to put myself out in the world the same way. During this time I decided to go travelling to Latin America, a place I've so desperately wanted to go for so long and I thought it might be nice to play some music along the way and meet those fans that had been messaging me and supporting me all those years. I could never have imagined getting so much confidence and a sense of direction going forth from that trip. I couldn't believe the amount of people who came to the shows that were organized by an individual fan and they knew all the words. It was during that trip that I realized the songs that meant the most to people were some of the more heartfelt meaningful songs. I knew that I wanted to make a record for my fans who had connected to me and my music on a deeper level and to do that I really dug deep into myself and put everything into this new record for them and myself. Feels like I've truly found myself on this journey (as cheesy as it sounds).

It sounds like such a wonderful, surreal thing to be spending time living and performing for fans for months on end. What did you learn from doing so? Would you ever do it again?

I learned a huge amount about myself, my connection to music and understood myself for my true being not who I may have been trying to be. I think we all feel a need to 'fit in' whether that's at school or work, but I realized that I could be me and feel accepted. I learned how important music was to me. It wasn't just a hobby, it's a way a life which I know it always will be. And as for the people I stayed with, I learned that everyone is so generous and the kindness that was shown to my husband and me by every person really blew my mind. I'm hoping to stay with fans on my US and Canadian tour. I'm addicted to it.

Your husband also filmed this journey and it was compiled into a documentary. What was that like?

He was definitely thrown into the deep end. He hadn't ever filmed anything and only three days before we left we bought a camera and he quickly learned how to use it. We both got used to it but it probably did take a week for us to feel completely comfortable having a camera around all the time. But he's always had a great eye and passion for photography and he did an amazing job. My friend Dave Tree then had the joy of editing together 62 days worth of footage, some task!

What do you think some of the big differences are between the music scene in Latin America compared to the United States?

It's hard to know, but I think a lot less bands tour Latin America so it sometimes feel like a bigger event for the people that live there that an artist has come. It's the same in so many less toured countries, you feel like they really appreciate that you've made the effort to come and play music. I've always had a wonderful time touring the US and Canada, but I do think they sing a bit louder in Latin America.

Now that you've put out the record, what are some of your favorite tracks? Have they changed for you over time?

It's so hard to choose. I have such a strong connection with all of them. Musically I love "Is This Called Home," but "I Can't Change It All" really has a special place in my heart. I'm sure they will change over time but as I hear people's connections to certain songs they take on a different form.

Your songs really seem to connect with listeners because they're so emotional and powerfully written. What did this record teach you about your songwriting process?

Yes definitely. It taught me to talk more, on a deeper level, with friends, colleagues, family – about how they really feel in life, learn what's important to each of them and also I looked into myself and how I see myself.

This fall, you're going to be heading out on the road and playing some pretty cool venues in the states, as well as going abroad. What are you looking forward to with the upcoming tour?

I'm really excited about touring the US and Canada. I have some of my best memories last time I was there. It's always a proper road trip and I love driving and the scenery is just immense. I feel bad I haven't been back sooner so I'm excited to say hello.


Something's Changing is out on Communion Group (and through Arts & Crafts in North America) everywhere now.

Follow Lucy Rose on Facebook |

It sounds like such a wonderful, surreal thing to be spending time living and performing for fans for months on end. What did you learn from doing so? Would you ever do it again?

I learned a huge amount about myself, my connection to music and understood myself for my true being not who I may have been trying to be. I think we all feel a need to 'fit in' whether that's at school or work, but I realized that I could be me and feel accepted. I learned how important music was to me. It wasn't just a hobby, it's a way a life which I know it always will be. And as for the people I stayed with, I learned that everyone is so generous and the kindness that was shown to my husband and me by every person really blew my mind. I'm hoping to stay with fans on my US and Canadian tour. I'm addicted to it.

Your husband also filmed this journey and it was compiled into a documentary. What was that like?

He was definitely thrown into the deep end. He hadn't ever filmed anything and only three days before we left we bought a camera and he quickly learned how to use it. We both got used to it but it probably did take a week for us to feel completely comfortable having a camera around all the time. But he's always had a great eye and passion for photography and he did an amazing job. My friend Dave Tree then had the joy of editing together 62 days worth of footage, some task!

What do you think some of the big differences are between the music scene in Latin America compared to the United States?

It's hard to know, but I think a lot less bands tour Latin America so it sometimes feel like a bigger event for the people that live there that an artist has come. It's the same in so many less toured countries, you feel like they really appreciate that you've made the effort to come and play music. I've always had a wonderful time touring the US and Canada, but I do think they sing a bit louder in Latin America.

Now that you've put out the record, what are some of your favorite tracks? Have they changed for you over time?

It's so hard to choose. I have such a strong connection with all of them. Musically I love "Is This Called Home," but "I Can't Change It All" really has a special place in my heart. I'm sure they will change over time but as I hear people's connections to certain songs they take on a different form.

Your songs really seem to connect with listeners because they're so emotional and powerfully written. What did this record teach you about your songwriting process?

Yes definitely. It taught me to talk more, on a deeper level, with friends, colleagues, family – about how they really feel in life, learn what's important to each of them and also I looked into myself and how I see myself.

This fall, you're going to be heading out on the road and playing some pretty cool venues in the states, as well as going abroad. What are you looking forward to with the upcoming tour?

I'm really excited about touring the US and Canada. I have some of my best memories last time I was there. It's always a proper road trip and I love driving and the scenery is just immense. I feel bad I haven't been back sooner so I'm excited to say hello.


Something's Changing is out on Communion Group (and through Arts & Crafts in North America) everywhere now.

Follow Lucy Rose on Facebook |

It sounds like such a wonderful, surreal thing to be spending time living and performing for fans for months on end. What did you learn from doing so? Would you ever do it again?

I learned a huge amount about myself, my connection to music and understood myself for my true being not who I may have been trying to be. I think we all feel a need to 'fit in' whether that's at school or work, but I realized that I could be me and feel accepted. I learned how important music was to me. It wasn't just a hobby, it's a way a life which I know it always will be. And as for the people I stayed with, I learned that everyone is so generous and the kindness that was shown to my husband and me by every person really blew my mind. I'm hoping to stay with fans on my US and Canadian tour. I'm addicted to it.

Your husband also filmed this journey and it was compiled into a documentary. What was that like?

He was definitely thrown into the deep end. He hadn't ever filmed anything and only three days before we left we bought a camera and he quickly learned how to use it. We both got used to it but it probably did take a week for us to feel completely comfortable having a camera around all the time. But he's always had a great eye and passion for photography and he did an amazing job. My friend Dave Tree then had the joy of editing together 62 days worth of footage, some task!

What do you think some of the big differences are between the music scene in Latin America compared to the United States?

It's hard to know, but I think a lot less bands tour Latin America so it sometimes feel like a bigger event for the people that live there that an artist has come. It's the same in so many less toured countries, you feel like they really appreciate that you've made the effort to come and play music. I've always had a wonderful time touring the US and Canada, but I do think they sing a bit louder in Latin America.

Now that you've put out the record, what are some of your favorite tracks? Have they changed for you over time?

It's so hard to choose. I have such a strong connection with all of them. Musically I love "Is This Called Home," but "I Can't Change It All" really has a special place in my heart. I'm sure they will change over time but as I hear people's connections to certain songs they take on a different form.

Your songs really seem to connect with listeners because they're so emotional and powerfully written. What did this record teach you about your songwriting process?

Yes definitely. It taught me to talk more, on a deeper level, with friends, colleagues, family – about how they really feel in life, learn what's important to each of them and also I looked into myself and how I see myself.

This fall, you're going to be heading out on the road and playing some pretty cool venues in the states, as well as going abroad. What are you looking forward to with the upcoming tour?

I'm really excited about touring the US and Canada. I have some of my best memories last time I was there. It's always a proper road trip and I love driving and the scenery is just immense. I feel bad I haven't been back sooner so I'm excited to say hello.


Something's Changing is out on Communion Group (and through Arts & Crafts in North America) everywhere now.

Follow Lucy Rose on Facebook |

It sounds like such a wonderful, surreal thing to be spending time living and performing for fans for months on end. What did you learn from doing so? Would you ever do it again?

I learned a huge amount about myself, my connection to music and understood myself for my true being not who I may have been trying to be. I think we all feel a need to 'fit in' whether that's at school or work, but I realized that I could be me and feel accepted. I learned how important music was to me. It wasn't just a hobby, it's a way a life which I know it always will be. And as for the people I stayed with, I learned that everyone is so generous and the kindness that was shown to my husband and me by every person really blew my mind. I'm hoping to stay with fans on my US and Canadian tour. I'm addicted to it.

Your husband also filmed this journey and it was compiled into a documentary. What was that like?

He was definitely thrown into the deep end. He hadn't ever filmed anything and only three days before we left we bought a camera and he quickly learned how to use it. We both got used to it but it probably did take a week for us to feel completely comfortable having a camera around all the time. But he's always had a great eye and passion for photography and he did an amazing job. My friend Dave Tree then had the joy of editing together 62 days worth of footage, some task!

What do you think some of the big differences are between the music scene in Latin America compared to the United States?

It's hard to know, but I think a lot less bands tour Latin America so it sometimes feel like a bigger event for the people that live there that an artist has come. It's the same in so many less toured countries, you feel like they really appreciate that you've made the effort to come and play music. I've always had a wonderful time touring the US and Canada, but I do think they sing a bit louder in Latin America.

Now that you've put out the record, what are some of your favorite tracks? Have they changed for you over time?

It's so hard to choose. I have such a strong connection with all of them. Musically I love "Is This Called Home," but "I Can't Change It All" really has a special place in my heart. I'm sure they will change over time but as I hear people's connections to certain songs they take on a different form.

Your songs really seem to connect with listeners because they're so emotional and powerfully written. What did this record teach you about your songwriting process?

Yes definitely. It taught me to talk more, on a deeper level, with friends, colleagues, family – about how they really feel in life, learn what's important to each of them and also I looked into myself and how I see myself.

This fall, you're going to be heading out on the road and playing some pretty cool venues in the states, as well as going abroad. What are you looking forward to with the upcoming tour?

I'm really excited about touring the US and Canada. I have some of my best memories last time I was there. It's always a proper road trip and I love driving and the scenery is just immense. I feel bad I haven't been back sooner so I'm excited to say hello.


Something's Changing is out on Communion Group (and through Arts & Crafts in North America) everywhere now.

Follow Lucy Rose on Facebook |

It sounds like such a wonderful, surreal thing to be spending time living and performing for fans for months on end. What did you learn from doing so? Would you ever do it again?

I learned a huge amount about myself, my connection to music and understood myself for my true being not who I may have been trying to be. I think we all feel a need to 'fit in' whether that's at school or work, but I realized that I could be me and feel accepted. I learned how important music was to me. It wasn't just a hobby, it's a way a life which I know it always will be. And as for the people I stayed with, I learned that everyone is so generous and the kindness that was shown to my husband and me by every person really blew my mind. I'm hoping to stay with fans on my US and Canadian tour. I'm addicted to it.

Your husband also filmed this journey and it was compiled into a documentary. What was that like?

He was definitely thrown into the deep end. He hadn't ever filmed anything and only three days before we left we bought a camera and he quickly learned how to use it. We both got used to it but it probably did take a week for us to feel completely comfortable having a camera around all the time. But he's always had a great eye and passion for photography and he did an amazing job. My friend Dave Tree then had the joy of editing together 62 days worth of footage, some task!

What do you think some of the big differences are between the music scene in Latin America compared to the United States?

It's hard to know, but I think a lot less bands tour Latin America so it sometimes feel like a bigger event for the people that live there that an artist has come. It's the same in so many less toured countries, you feel like they really appreciate that you've made the effort to come and play music. I've always had a wonderful time touring the US and Canada, but I do think they sing a bit louder in Latin America.

Now that you've put out the record, what are some of your favorite tracks? Have they changed for you over time?

It's so hard to choose. I have such a strong connection with all of them. Musically I love "Is This Called Home," but "I Can't Change It All" really has a special place in my heart. I'm sure they will change over time but as I hear people's connections to certain songs they take on a different form.

Your songs really seem to connect with listeners because they're so emotional and powerfully written. What did this record teach you about your songwriting process?

Yes definitely. It taught me to talk more, on a deeper level, with friends, colleagues, family – about how they really feel in life, learn what's important to each of them and also I looked into myself and how I see myself.

This fall, you're going to be heading out on the road and playing some pretty cool venues in the states, as well as going abroad. What are you looking forward to with the upcoming tour?

I'm really excited about touring the US and Canada. I have some of my best memories last time I was there. It's always a proper road trip and I love driving and the scenery is just immense. I feel bad I haven't been back sooner so I'm excited to say hello.


Something's Changing is out on Communion Group (and through Arts & Crafts in North America) everywhere now.

Follow Lucy Rose on Facebook |

It sounds like such a wonderful, surreal thing to be spending time living and performing for fans for months on end. What did you learn from doing so? Would you ever do it again?

I learned a huge amount about myself, my connection to music and understood myself for my true being not who I may have been trying to be. I think we all feel a need to 'fit in' whether that's at school or work, but I realized that I could be me and feel accepted. I learned how important music was to me. It wasn't just a hobby, it's a way a life which I know it always will be. And as for the people I stayed with, I learned that everyone is so generous and the kindness that was shown to my husband and me by every person really blew my mind. I'm hoping to stay with fans on my US and Canadian tour. I'm addicted to it.

Your husband also filmed this journey and it was compiled into a documentary. What was that like?

He was definitely thrown into the deep end. He hadn't ever filmed anything and only three days before we left we bought a camera and he quickly learned how to use it. We both got used to it but it probably did take a week for us to feel completely comfortable having a camera around all the time. But he's always had a great eye and passion for photography and he did an amazing job. My friend Dave Tree then had the joy of editing together 62 days worth of footage, some task!

What do you think some of the big differences are between the music scene in Latin America compared to the United States?

It's hard to know, but I think a lot less bands tour Latin America so it sometimes feel like a bigger event for the people that live there that an artist has come. It's the same in so many less toured countries, you feel like they really appreciate that you've made the effort to come and play music. I've always had a wonderful time touring the US and Canada, but I do think they sing a bit louder in Latin America.

Now that you've put out the record, what are some of your favorite tracks? Have they changed for you over time?

It's so hard to choose. I have such a strong connection with all of them. Musically I love "Is This Called Home," but "I Can't Change It All" really has a special place in my heart. I'm sure they will change over time but as I hear people's connections to certain songs they take on a different form.

Your songs really seem to connect with listeners because they're so emotional and powerfully written. What did this record teach you about your songwriting process?

Yes definitely. It taught me to talk more, on a deeper level, with friends, colleagues, family – about how they really feel in life, learn what's important to each of them and also I looked into myself and how I see myself.

This fall, you're going to be heading out on the road and playing some pretty cool venues in the states, as well as going abroad. What are you looking forward to with the upcoming tour?

I'm really excited about touring the US and Canada. I have some of my best memories last time I was there. It's always a proper road trip and I love driving and the scenery is just immense. I feel bad I haven't been back sooner so I'm excited to say hello.


Something's Changing is out on Communion Group (and through Arts & Crafts in North America) everywhere now.

Follow Lucy Rose on Facebook |

It sounds like such a wonderful, surreal thing to be spending time living and performing for fans for months on end. What did you learn from doing so? Would you ever do it again?

I learned a huge amount about myself, my connection to music and understood myself for my true being not who I may have been trying to be. I think we all feel a need to 'fit in' whether that's at school or work, but I realized that I could be me and feel accepted. I learned how important music was to me. It wasn't just a hobby, it's a way a life which I know it always will be. And as for the people I stayed with, I learned that everyone is so generous and the kindness that was shown to my husband and me by every person really blew my mind. I'm hoping to stay with fans on my US and Canadian tour. I'm addicted to it.

Your husband also filmed this journey and it was compiled into a documentary. What was that like?

He was definitely thrown into the deep end. He hadn't ever filmed anything and only three days before we left we bought a camera and he quickly learned how to use it. We both got used to it but it probably did take a week for us to feel completely comfortable having a camera around all the time. But he's always had a great eye and passion for photography and he did an amazing job. My friend Dave Tree then had the joy of editing together 62 days worth of footage, some task!

What do you think some of the big differences are between the music scene in Latin America compared to the United States?

It's hard to know, but I think a lot less bands tour Latin America so it sometimes feel like a bigger event for the people that live there that an artist has come. It's the same in so many less toured countries, you feel like they really appreciate that you've made the effort to come and play music. I've always had a wonderful time touring the US and Canada, but I do think they sing a bit louder in Latin America.

Now that you've put out the record, what are some of your favorite tracks? Have they changed for you over time?

It's so hard to choose. I have such a strong connection with all of them. Musically I love "Is This Called Home," but "I Can't Change It All" really has a special place in my heart. I'm sure they will change over time but as I hear people's connections to certain songs they take on a different form.

Your songs really seem to connect with listeners because they're so emotional and powerfully written. What did this record teach you about your songwriting process?

Yes definitely. It taught me to talk more, on a deeper level, with friends, colleagues, family – about how they really feel in life, learn what's important to each of them and also I looked into myself and how I see myself.

This fall, you're going to be heading out on the road and playing some pretty cool venues in the states, as well as going abroad. What are you looking forward to with the upcoming tour?

I'm really excited about touring the US and Canada. I have some of my best memories last time I was there. It's always a proper road trip and I love driving and the scenery is just immense. I feel bad I haven't been back sooner so I'm excited to say hello.


Something's Changing is out on Communion Group (and through Arts & Crafts in North America) everywhere now.

Follow Lucy Rose on Facebook |

It sounds like such a wonderful, surreal thing to be spending time living and performing for fans for months on end. What did you learn from doing so? Would you ever do it again?

I learned a huge amount about myself, my connection to music and understood myself for my true being not who I may have been trying to be. I think we all feel a need to 'fit in' whether that's at school or work, but I realized that I could be me and feel accepted. I learned how important music was to me. It wasn't just a hobby, it's a way a life which I know it always will be. And as for the people I stayed with, I learned that everyone is so generous and the kindness that was shown to my husband and me by every person really blew my mind. I'm hoping to stay with fans on my US and Canadian tour. I'm addicted to it.

Your husband also filmed this journey and it was compiled into a documentary. What was that like?

He was definitely thrown into the deep end. He hadn't ever filmed anything and only three days before we left we bought a camera and he quickly learned how to use it. We both got used to it but it probably did take a week for us to feel completely comfortable having a camera around all the time. But he's always had a great eye and passion for photography and he did an amazing job. My friend Dave Tree then had the joy of editing together 62 days worth of footage, some task!

What do you think some of the big differences are between the music scene in Latin America compared to the United States?

It's hard to know, but I think a lot less bands tour Latin America so it sometimes feel like a bigger event for the people that live there that an artist has come. It's the same in so many less toured countries, you feel like they really appreciate that you've made the effort to come and play music. I've always had a wonderful time touring the US and Canada, but I do think they sing a bit louder in Latin America.

Now that you've put out the record, what are some of your favorite tracks? Have they changed for you over time?

It's so hard to choose. I have such a strong connection with all of them. Musically I love "Is This Called Home," but "I Can't Change It All" really has a special place in my heart. I'm sure they will change over time but as I hear people's connections to certain songs they take on a different form.

Your songs really seem to connect with listeners because they're so emotional and powerfully written. What did this record teach you about your songwriting process?

Yes definitely. It taught me to talk more, on a deeper level, with friends, colleagues, family – about how they really feel in life, learn what's important to each of them and also I looked into myself and how I see myself.

This fall, you're going to be heading out on the road and playing some pretty cool venues in the states, as well as going abroad. What are you looking forward to with the upcoming tour?

I'm really excited about touring the US and Canada. I have some of my best memories last time I was there. It's always a proper road trip and I love driving and the scenery is just immense. I feel bad I haven't been back sooner so I'm excited to say hello.


Something's Changing is out on Communion Group (and through Arts & Crafts in North America) everywhere now.

Follow Lucy Rose on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram.


Rachel A.G. Gilman is a writer, a radio producer, and probably the girl wearing the Kinks shirt. Follow her on Twitter.


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