In GQ's November issue, Nicki Minaj confirms suspicions that she is a little bit of an asshole. In the article , headlined "Nicki Minaj: Cheeky Genius," the interviewer, Taffy Brodesser-Akner, agonizes through Nicki’s boredom and evasiveness.

To kick off the douchebaggery, Nicki, fell asleep four times during the interview.

 GQ:

"She"—Nicki's character in the video—"is just talking about two guys that she dated in the past and what they're good at and what they bought her and what they said to her. It's just cheeky, like a funny story." Cheeky. She has to be messing with me.

But Nicki shakes her head: "All it says is, 'My anaconda don't.'" Why are we talking about asses? she seems to be saying. Sure, there is a direct, not inferred, reference in her lyrics to "salad tossing"—which, to be clear, is the act of being anally probed by someone else's tongue. But this is a song about reptiles. Don't be such an intellectual!

She said her message is that "it's okay to be curvy and have a couple extra pounds on you."

You can't pretend that there isn't some extreme sexual commentary going on in the video, right? A steamy women's-only jungle mecca, aerobic slithering, drumming on a dancer's ass. There, in the video, Nicki is twerking and crawling across the floor to poor, hapless Drake, sitting in a puddle of his own anticipatory blue balls. She slaps him before he can touch her, and that has to mean something.

"I knew that I wanted a gym theme." Shrug. "And that's that." That's that, guys. That's that.

Nicki was not in the mood to talk about "Anaconda." Eventually, she relented somewhat:

"At first I'm being sexual with the banana, and then it's like, 'Ha-ha, no.'" I ask if she's referring to how the Drake scene immediately follows the kitchen scene. "Yeah, that was important for us to show in the kitchen scene, because it's always about the female taking back the power, and if you want to be flirty and funny that's fine, but always keeping the power and the control in everything."

And that's that.