We've reviewed every song on Daft Punk's latest masterwork, the just-released Random Access Memories. Check out our opinions on each of the album's 13 tracks, collected in one place for your convenience below. Click on the links for the individual song reviews, or just click NEXT to read them one at a time.

1. "Give Life Back to Music"

2. "The Game of Love"

3. "Giorgio By Moroder"

4. "Within"

5. "Instant Crush"

6. "Lose Yourself to Dance"

7. "Touch"

8. "Get Lucky"

9. "Beyond"

10. "Motherboard"

11. "Fragments of Time"

12. "Doin' It Right"

13. "Contact"

1. "GIVE LIFE BACK TO MUSIC"

Daft Punk puts just about all of it out on Front Street with the first minute to Random Access Memories opener "Give Life to Music." It starts out with a dramatic, crashing, all-instruments-on-deck intro that wouldn't have sounded out of place on an Electric Light Orchestra single, then quickly settles into a gentle disco groove, with the inimitable Nile Rodgers (formerly of "Good Times" hitmakers Chic and the premier funk guitarist of the Studio 54 era) chopping it up in support of the Robots, who sing in their typically vocodored croon "Let the music in tonight / Just turn on the music / Let the music of your life / Give life back to music."

And within the first few minutes, you know just about all you need to know about Random Access Memories. It's an exceedingly '70s indebted album, not just to the classic disco of the period that has obviously been a huge influence on Daft Punk throughout their whole career, but to the proggier, album-oriented rock of the era as well, and the kind of futuristic, utopian musical ideals that permeated the time. It's not subtle, and it's more than a little cheesy, but it's also very authentically Daft Punk, though in a more organic, less synthetic strain, aside from the dehumanized-as-ever vocals.

It's also considerably sublime, as the duo finds themselves right at home in the song's inclusive, yacht-rock-smooth groove, with the intro (recurring as a break throughout the song) providing just enough muscle to keep "Give Life" from floating away into thin air. The lyrical sentiment gets a little repetitive--it often does with Daft Punk--but it's agreeable enough that it never gets too annoying. A hell of a way to get things started.

POPDUST SAYS: 4/5

Next up, the sleek ballad "The Game of Love."

2. "THE GAME OF LOVE"

The impossible smoothness continues into second track "The Game of Love," a thickly produced funk ballad with deep bass, airy synths and plenty of muted guitar. In fact, the song's obvious nocturnal, sensual vibe would probably get it instantly dubbed as "porn funk," if not for the Robots' distractingly distorted vocals, singing (somewhat nonsensically) "There is a game of love / And it was you / The one that would be breaking my heart / When you decided to walk away." (That said, if you happen to have a couple androids in your household, probably best not to play this song around them--it might get messy pretty quickly.)

In any event, the song is a worthwhile sequel to Discovery's mood-setter "Something About Us," similarly hypnotic and seductive, although while that song got in and out in under four minutes, with just one verse and one chorus, "Game" lingers a little, running over five minutes and making damn sure you know about the game of love breaking their heart. Not really necessary, but Random Access Memories is so big-scaled in nature that it makes per-song complaints about editing seem kind of foolish and besides the point anyway.

POPDUST SAYS: 3/5

Next up, the homage-paying synth epic "Giorgio By Moroder."

3. "GIORGIO BY MORODER"

The first of Random Access Memories' true litmus tests for audience tolerance of their current level of self-indulgence. To some, listening to disco and electro-pop pioneer Giorgio Morder (writer and producer behind such dance/pop classics as Donna Summer's "I Feel Love" and Blondie's "Call Me") relate his early-life experiences and musical inspirations over nine minutes of zooming space-funk (with extended electric piano solos and string breakdowns!) probably sounds like a damn good time, to others, it probably sounds absolutely interminable. Neither reaction would be totally inaccurate or unfair, but the reaction you have will probably be fairly indicative of your ultimate feelings towards RAM in its entirety.

As for us, we'd fall more in the "damn good time" category, though if you wanted to cut a minute or two from the middle, we wouldn't be hugely disappointed. If anything, we wish there was more actual Giorgio on the track--his hybrid-accented speaking voice is thoroughly captivating, as are his stories about sleeping in his car on the way to and from discotheques and attempting to invent a sound of the future. When his voice cuts out about six minutes in, giving way to a whole lot more instrumental noodling, our interest definitely starts to drift a little. Still, where the hell else are you gonna hear anything even remotely like this?

POPDUST SAYS: 3.5/5

Next up, another robo slow jam with "Within."

4. "WITHIN"

The bedroom funk of "The Game Of Love" is usually about as slow as Daft Punk tends to get, but they wind down things even further on Random Access Memories with "Within," beginning with a dramatic piano intro that eventually makes room for some light brush-drumming and DP's robo-crooning about "a world within me that I cannot explain," and pleading "I've been looking for someone / I need to know, please tell me who I am." It almost sounds like a theatrical number, a solo interlude to further the development of a character, but while RAM is conceptual, it isn't that conceptual, and "Within" falls a bit short of being interesting enough to justify the dragginess.

There might be a lesson here for Daft Punk about keeping things above a certain BPM, or about keeping their own vocals from taking up a certain percentage of a song's musical makeup. In any event, the duo's piano-playing fans seem to have a different degree of appreciation for the song, given the number of amateur covers of "Within" already available on YouTube. Not for us, though.

POPDUST SAYS: 2.5/5

Next up, the Julian Casablancas-featuring "Instant Crush."

5. "INSTANT CRUSH"

Back in 2001, when both artists were at the peak of their popularity and acclaim, it would be virtually inconceivable to think that Daft Punk and Julian Casablancas (of New York alt-rock demigods The Strokes) would do a song together. But in the meantime, Casablancas has gotten a little more synth-pop, and DP have gotten a little more rock and roll, and now a collaboration between the two of them doesn't sound so jarring, conceptually or practically--in fact, "Instant Crush" sounds almost exactly halfway between where the two artists are right now, and not an awkward stretch of any kind on anyone's part.

So what does that midway point sound like? Well, it's a tense, midtempo groove vaguely reminiscent of the Alan Parsons Project's '80s prog-pop hit "Eye in the Sky," with Casablancas working out his hushed falsetto as he did for much of the recent Comedown Machine LP, though auto-tuned to the point of sounding Daft Punk-esque. It's not until the chorus releases into a pop/rock burst that things become recognizably Strokesian, Casablancas singing flusteredly about a relationship over a synth two-step.

A 2001 collab between Daft Punk and Julian Casablancas undoubtedly would've seemed like the future of music. In 2013, it'll have to settle for being a kind-of-cool pop song.

POPDUST SAYS: 3.5/5

Next up, the album's first Pharrell disco workout, "Lose Yourself to Dance"

6. "LOSE YOURSELF TO DANCE"

"Lose Yourself to Dance" may or may not be the second single off Random Access Memories, but it's hard to believe it won't get pulled eventually. Like the album's first single, which we'll get to in a couple tracks, "Dance" unites the holy pop-funk trinity of Daft Punk, Chic guitarist Nile Rodgers and Neptunes beatmaker / hook singer Pharrell Williams for a disco workout of undeniable divinity. Pharrell's falsetto fits like a diamond-studded glove over Rodgers' shimmering guitar hook and the Robots' popping bass and clapping drums, and by song's end, you'll be strapping on the polyester and Googling the location of the nearest roller rink.

The lyrics are basically a non-entity here, but all you really need is Pharrell's "Sweat, SWEAT, SWEAT!!" build-up to the titular "LOSE YOURSELF TO DANCE!" exhortation, at which point, you're already way ahead of all of them. Daft Punk are wise not to break the mood with too much of their own robo-vocals, just chiming in on some "c'mon, c'mon, c'mon"s in the background, as the song digs itself deep into a groove nearly as blissful as any found on Chic's classic late-'70s LPs. Not groundbreaking by any means, but still very impressive stuff.

POPDUST SAYS: 4.5/5

Next up, the ambitious centerpiece "Touch."

7. "TOUCH"

Perhaps even moreso than "Giorgio by Moroder," "Touch" is a pretty good test of how much tolerance you'll have for the entirety of Random Access Memories. A sweeping, eight-minute-plus epic that shifts from melodramatic prog-pop to Andrew Lloyd Weber-like theatricality to soaring disco to honky-tonk ragtime to near-gospel balladry and all back again, "Touch" is undoubtedly the most ambitious thing to be found on Daft Punk's third album, obviously meant to serve as the LP's centerpiece, and certainly one of the most singular pieces of music you're likely to hear in 2013.

The fact that it's not a complete disaster is, from the outset, a pretty sizeable accomplishment. Your tolerance for the song's many shifts in tone, tempo and tenor, as well as for the comically overwrought singing and lyrics ("A room within a room, a door within a door / Touch, where do you lead? / I need something more") from guest vocalist Paul Williams (of "Rainbow Connection" and '70s miscellany fame), may be understandably slim, but there's definite moments of inspiration to behold in "Touch," especially the anthemic "Hold on / If love is the answer, you're home" singalong that makes for the song's climax.

We're actually all the way in on the whole crazy thing, but if you could only stand to listen to all 8:17 of it once or twice in a year, we couldn't really blame you.

POPDUST SAYS: 4/5

Next up, the hit first single "Get Lucky."

8. "GET LUCKY"

The public has already very clearly ruled in favor of Random Access Memories lead single "Get Lucky," the song still residing in the top ten of iTunes nearly a month after its release, and why not? As in "Lose Yourself to Dance," Pharrell, Nile and the Robots hook up here for a disco jam that's instantly recognizable and instantly familiar-sounding, music that feels like it's already been with you for as long as you can remember. The groove is intoxicating, the lyrics are obviously agreeable (even if we still think they're more more about musical chemistry than sexual) and the song's general vibe is one of unreserved inclusiveness and positivity. It's hard to find too much to grouse about here.

The only real thing you could say against "Get Lucky"--minus that the Robots' endlessly repeated "We're up all night to get lucky" chant at song's end gets a mite grating--is that it doesn't really break much ground, looking all the way backwards when Daft Punk used to be perennial ground-breakers in dance music. But that's a complaint for the thinkpieces, not for the dancefloor, where "Get Lucky" will undoubtedly reign supreme all summer. It's hard to imagine getting too sick of it.

POPDUST SAYS: 4/5

Next up, the down-tempo creeper "Beyond"

9. "BEYOND"

Hell of an attention-grabbing string intro to this one, though it quickly proves a red herring, as the song settles back down to a slower-paced, driving-at-night kind of R&B groove. The bass line extremely reminiscent of Michael McDonald's early-'80s classic "I Keep Forgetting," so much so that some enterprising sorts on YouTube have already mashed "Beyond" up with Warren G. and Nate Dogg's McDonald-sampling "Regulate." As well-traveled as that bass thump may be, it's never an unwelcome presence, making "Beyond" highly listenable all on its own.

Unfortunately, there's not too much else to the song beyond that borrowed groove and the shrieking strings that introduce it. If Daft Punk make one really harmful miscalculation over the course of Random Access Memories, it's surely that they don't properly realize that as fun as their vocoder-drowned vocals can be in bite-size hook (or backing punctuation) form, they get absolutely exhausting over an entire verse/chorus/verse number, as proven by the likes of "Within" and "Beyond," which never really goes anywhere and lasts for at least a minute longer than it has to. Nate Dogg would never have let this happen.

POPDUST SAYS: 2.5/5

Up next, the cinematic instrumental "Motherboard."

10. "MOTHERBOARD"

Strings, woodwinds, acoustic guitar and all kinds of synths adorn the widescreen shuffle of the instrumental "Motherboard," one of the most cinematic compositions on Random Access Memories, serving almost as a second intermission before the album's closing trio of songs. There's not much of a hook here to speak of, but that's not necessarily a bad thing, as "Motherboard" is more about atmosphere and groove anyway, and it has both of those to spare, with enough going on in the texture of its composition to maintain interest, and make for a damn fine closer to the album's second act. It's not one of the first songs you'll remember from the album, but it's one that'll grow on you with time.

What's with the rain sounds that end the song, though? Not every cool atmospheric song has to end in a downpour, guys. It's been done.

POPDUST SAYS: 3.5/5

Next up, the uncharacteristic "Fragments of Time."

11. "FRAGMENTS OF TIME"

Much of Random Access Memories feels out of character for Daft Punk, but "Fragments of Time" is almost totally unidentifiable as being the duo's brainchild. For a collaboration between two major dance artists--garage/house producer and longtime DP bro Todd Edwards provides vocals--"Fragments" somehow ends up as a super-smooth pop/rock nugget, sounding kind of like Phoenix covering Steely Dan. If not for the "Digital Love"-like solo that appears in the song's bridge, we'd have no real way of knowing that the Robots were in any way involved with this one.

Still, that's not to say that "Fragments" is in any way a bad or unwelcome addition to RAM. The song is as catchy and clean-sounding as the Phoenix/Steely comparisons would indicate, and Todd Edwards has a nicely unassuming voice that fits the song quite beautifully. It's a nice counter-balance to some of the album's more overbearing numbers, and even though the song isn't exactly short at 4:37, it always feels pretty light on its feet, a pleasant surprise from the album's final stretch.

POPDUST SAYS: 4/5

Up next, the Panda Bear-featuring "Doin' It Right."

12. "DOIN' IT RIGHT"

Most of the songs with guest singers on Random Access Memories see the Robots taking a backseat on the vocals, just chiming in with backup vocals here and there and maybe warbling the song out at the end. On "Doin' It Right," though, they take the primary hook themselves, establishing it at song's beginning and delivering it continuously throughout. Given their vocals' overexposure elsewhere on the album, this could have been disastrous, but the song's hook (an up-and-down-the-scale "Everybody will be dancing and be doing it / feeling all right") is so insidious and so unintrusive that it almost feels more like an instrumental hook anyway, just laying the groundwork (along with the song's simple boom-bap four/four beat) for the rest of the song.

And Panda Bear, not exactly known as a go-to party-starter in his work as a solo artist or the singer for Animal Collective, is surprisingly up for the task of stewarding the song, his earnest, reaching vocals hitting all the right notes as he sings "If you lose your way tonight / That's how you know the magic's right." It's a much less obvious slam dunk than the duo's two Pharrell collaborations, but it's arguably a richer return, a surprisingly successful blend of the starkly hypnotic qualities of the best Panda Bear songs and the crowd-pleasing maximalism of the best Daft Punk jams. This is what collaboration's all about, people.

POPDUST SAYS: 4.5/5

Up last, the interstellar closer "Contact."

13. "CONTACT"

The lush opening synths make "Contact" sound like it's going to explode into something off their French countrymen M83's latest album Hurry Up, We're Dreaming, but the synth-organs and drums that take over after the song's outer-space transmission sample ends put this closer back in Daft Punk (this era of Daft Punk, anyway) territory. In fact, this is the song on the album that possibly sounds the most like a version of DP we've heard before, even if it was only on the duo's recent TRON: Legacy soundtrack, which used a similar sound on tracks like "Derezzed" and "End of Line," though really, this is most reminiscent of the techno-in-space experiments that populated their one-time big beat buds Chemical Brothers' recent Further album, particularly "Escape Velocity."

Anyway, it's an appropriately interstellar way to end a Daft Punk album, even though with its perpetually crashing live drums and lack of any kind of house pulse, it would have sounded completely alien (pun semi-intended) on any other Daft Punk album. That's Daft Punk for you, though--they aim to please, as long as they're not doing it in any of the ways you might have been previously expecting.

POPDUST SAYS: 3.5/5

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We're reviewing every song on Daft Punk's Random Access Memories today. Stay tuned for our take on all 13 tracks on the Robots' latest masterwork!

The lush opening synths make "Contact" sound like it's going to explode into something off their French countrymen M83's latest album Hurry Up, We're Dreaming, but the synth-organs and drums that take over after the song's outer-space transmission sample ends put this closer back in Daft Punk (this era of Daft Punk, anyway) territory. In fact, this is the song on the album that possibly sounds the most like a version of DP we've heard before, even if it was only on the duo's recent TRON: Legacy soundtrack, which used a similar sound on tracks like "Derezzed" and "End of Line," though really, this is most reminiscent of the techno-in-space experiments that populated their one-time big beat buds Chemical Brothers' recent Further album, particularly "Escape Velocity."

Anyway, it's an appropriately interstellar way to end a Daft Punk album, even though with its perpetually crashing live drums and lack of any kind of house pulse, it would have sounded completely alien (pun semi-intended) on any other Daft Punk album. That's Daft Punk for you, though--they aim to please, as long as they're not doing it in any of the ways you might have been previously expecting.

POPDUST SAYS: 3.5/5