TV News

Why TNT's "Snowpiercer" Marketing Is a Tone-Deaf Train Wreck

Or: Why I Won't Even Watch the First Episode of TNT's Snowpiercer

TNT

Even before Bong Joon-ho took Hollywood by storm with Parasite, fans of his work were already well-aware of his unparalleled knack for illustrating class warfare.

As a huge fan of violent action thrillers, and also anti-capitalist ideologies, Snowpiercer ranked among my favorite movies of the last decade. Parasite is inarguably more polished and subtle, but there's something refreshing about the blunt relentlessness of Snowpiercer's take on literal class warfare. Therein, Snowpiercer—a futuristic, high-speed train with cars corresponding to social class, carrying the last human survivors through an arctic, post-apocalyptic wasteland—is an outright metaphor for capitalism and the protagonist, played by Chris Evans, is an oppressed worker-turned-revolutionary who lives in the back of the train, where the working class are relegated, and decides to make his way to the front, where the social elite live in opulence. Finally, upon seeing the worst of humanity and reaching the engine, he realizes that the only moral choice, if he wants to end the class struggle, is to derail the train entirely.

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Music Features

On This Day: Hip-Hop Forever Changed America

Happy birthday to the world's biggest genre

On this day in 1973, Clive Campbell, the Jamaican-American "selector" known as DJ Kool Herc, hosted a "back to school jam" at 1520 Sedgewick Avenue in the Boogie Down Bronx of New York City.

Armed with a booming sound system and reggae beats, Herc– a shortened nickname for "Hercules"– commanded insatiable audiences across the South Bronx with his unique looping technique called the "Merry-Go Round." "[I knew that] they were waiting for this particular break," Herc later said, "and I got a couple of records that got the same break up in it. I wonder how it would be if I put them all together."

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