Film Lists

How to Stream All the 2020 Oscar Winning Movies

Its not too late to find out what all the hype is about.

The Academy Awards have the power to cement certain films into our collective cultural consciousness.

Just being nominated for an Oscar tends to lend a second life to a film, and a win adds even more to a movie's legacy. Last night, Parasite swept the major categories winning four awards including Best Picture. Its safe to say that anyone who hasn't yet seen Parasite will make it a priority in the coming days to find out what all the hype is about. If you're like many people, you probably didn't see the majority of the nominated films that took home golden statues last night. But don't worry, its not too late.

How to watch the Oscar winning films:

Parasite—Best picture, director, international feature film and original screenplay

Rent or buy: Amazon, Apple, YouTube

Joker—Joaquin Phoenix for best actor

Rent or buy: Amazon, Apple, YouTube

Judy—Renée Zellweger for best actress

Rent or buy: Amazon, Apple, YouTube

Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood—Brad Pitt for best supporting actor

Rent or buy: Amazon, Apple, YouTube

Marriage Story—Laura Dern for best supporting actress

Stream on Netflix

1917—Best cinematography, visual efforts and sound mixing

preorder on Amazon

Little Women—Best costume design

preorder on Amazon

Bombshell—Best makeup and hairstyling

preorder on Amazon

American Factory—Best documentary feature

Stream on Netflix


How to watch the Oscar-nominated films:

The Irishman—Nominated for best picture, director, supporting actor

Stream on Netflix

Jojo Rabbit—Nominated for best picture, best supporting actress

Buy: Amazon, Apple, YouTube

Ford v Ferrari—Nominated for best picture

Buy: Amazon, Apple, YouTube

Pain and Glory—Nominated for best actor

Rent or buy: Amazon, Apple, YouTube

The Two Popes—Nominated for Best actor

Stream on Netflix

Harriet—Nominated for best actress

Rent or buy: Amazon, Apple, YouTube

Richard Jewell—Nominated for best supporting actress

preorder on Amazon

A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood—Nominated for best supporting actor

Buy: Amazon, Apple, YouTube


How to watch the Oscar winning/nominated short films:

Brotherhood

Streaming on Vimeo and YouTube.

Dcera (Daughter)

Streaming on Vimeo

Hair Love

Streaming on YouTube.

In the Absence

Streaming on Vimeo.

Kitbull

Streaming on Disney+ and YouTube.

Learning to Skateboard in a Warzone (If You're A Girl)

Streaming on A&E, Sling TV, and Philo.

Life Overtakes Me

Streaming on Netflix.

Nefta Football Club

Streaming on Vimeo and YouTube.

Sister

Streaming on YouTube.

The Neighbors' Window

Streaming on Vimeo and YouTube.

Walk Run Cha-Cha

Streaming on Vimeo.

Culture Feature

Did Mr. Peanut, a Gay Cannibal, Kill Himself?

It has also been strongly implied that he is in hell.

Has there ever been a more quintessentially American tale than the rise and fall of Mr. Peanut?

Like so many titans of industry of the early 20th century, the monocled legume had humble beginnings. He was first introduced as the face of Planters Snacks in 1916, when a young boy named Antonio Gentile submitted his depiction of Mr. Peanut to a contest the company was holding. Then and there, an icon was born. A hardworking capitalist with dreams of the big time and all the glittery, mist-obscured promises of wealth, Mr. Peanut set out to hold Lady Liberty to her promises of salvation. It was his big break.

mr peanut

Soon, thanks to a single-mindedness that his colleagues admired and his competitors feared, Mr. Peanut's star continued to rise. He first appeared on a Times Square billboard in 1937, and his first commercial aired on television in the 1950s, leading to even more brand recognition that made him a star attraction at the New York World's Fair in 1961. Shortly after, Mr. Peanut transformed into the animated creature you know today, even earning himself a place on the Madison Ave Advertising Walk of Fame in 2004. But even the mighty fall.

Today, January 22 2020, at 104 years old, Mr. Peanut's story has come to a close.

The pants-less, monocled creature was pronounced dead by his official Twitter account at 11 AM EST. "It's with heavy hearts that we confirm Mr. Peanut has passed away at 104 years old," Samantha Hess, Planters Brand Manager at Kraft Heinz, said in a statement. "He will be remembered as the legume who always brought people together for nutty adventures and a good time. We encourage fans to tune in to Mr. Peanut's funeral during the third quarter of the Super Bowl to celebrate his life."

His story is, at first glance, an American success story. He began as a humble nut, but by putting on the airs of the upper class (namely: a monocle, cane, and top hat) he soon pulled himself out of poverty and into the upper-echelon of society. His image became synonymous with a snack food empire; but more than that, his image became symbolic of an American dream just out of reach. It was with a perfectly pressed blazer and a knowing smirk that he offered Americans promises of a better tomorrow in the form of bowls of roasted nuts. In the wake of his death, it's beginning to come to light that Mr. Peanut's public image differed wildly from the darkness of his personal life. Was this great American really who he seemed to be?

Much like the rugged individualism this country was founded on, Mr. Peanut had a ruthless side. He was often seen munching on smaller versions of himself. It was never quite clear if the nuts he was selling possessed faces and autonomy like his own. Did they feel pain? Did they scream? Did Mr. Peanut lure them into compliance by claiming to be one of them, only to betray and cannibalize them as soon as the cameras turned on? Did Mr. Peanut come from a race of humanoid-nut beings? Are the snack nuts he sold the cast-off fetuses of this society? Was Mr. Peanut commodifying and cannibalizing the lowliest members of his own race? How did we overlook this for so long? If we took Mr. Peanut's humanness as a given, how were we so comfortable dehumanizing and ostensibly murdering others like him? How could he tell us it was okay?

But, as there so often is, there is even more to his story. Many speculate that Mr. Peanut's dark side was fueled in part by repressed homosexuality. Considering that he was born in 1917, an era in which homosexuality was still seen as taboo, even evil, it's no wonder that his coming out story is as shrouded in shadows as his life.

In a 2010 commercial, we see a new side of Mr. Peanut.

www.youtube.com

There is no use beating around the bush: It is heavily implied that Mr. Peanut had sex with a male-presenting nutcracker. "Hey, sorry about last week. I don't know what got into me," the nutcracker says. Mr. Peanut replies, "Yeah, well, forgive and forget, kind of," he says, revealing that his shell is cracked. He then, rather brazenly, stuffs a ball gag in the nutcracker's mouth, and a mole says, "Do you like nuts?"

While Planters' reps denied the allegations that Mr. Peanut was a kinky, gay, legume with BDSM tendencies, rumors continued to circulate. It seemed nothing could revive his hyper-masculine, "guys guy" image, not even when a fleet of "Nut Mobiles" took to the streets in 2015.

It seems that, in 2020, perhaps tired of living a lie, Mr. Peanut took to the road with two of his interspecies lovers: a peanut-human tryst that ended in heartbreak, as made obvious by the following footage:

It seems that, at last recognizing his legacy of deception and resource-hoarding, perhaps finally looking the dark and empty void of the American dream in the face, Mr. Peanut gave up. He fell.

He left his two lovers dangling from the cliff side, screaming his name.

Here was a nut who rose to the top: a legume who achieved success, made billions, and ultimately gained everything that capitalism promises us will finally make us happy. But still. He fell.

He.

Fell.

One likes to imagine that as Mr. Peanut plummeted to his death, he was at least—at last—happy. No longer were the yokes of societal expectations weighing heavily on his shoulders. The virus of consumerism that made him who he was, a commodity to be sold along with his products, fled his body as the ground rose up to meet him. Perhaps he repented for his sins. Perhaps he cursed his creator, Antonio Gentile, for creating a monster and setting it loose on the world. Perhaps he even murmured the words of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein's Monster: "'Hateful day when I received life!' I exclaimed in agony. 'Accursed creator! Why did you form a monster so hideous that even you turned from me in disgust? God, in pity, made man beautiful and alluring, after his own image; but my form is a filthy type of yours, more horrid even from the very resemblance. Satan had his companions, fellow-devils, to admire and encourage him; but I am solitary and abhorred.'"

Perhaps it was with a sigh of relief that Mr. Peanut, at last, was cracked open by gravity and a cruel, cold world.

With awards season officially underway, the Oscars have announced their full list of the 2020 nominees.

Joker leads the pack with a grand total of 11 nominations, including Best Picture and Best Actor for Joaquin Phoenix. Three films each earned eight nods: The Irishman, 1917, and Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. Although fans were disappointed to see no Director recognition for Greta Gerwig—or any woman, for that matter—her adaptation of Little Women still racked up six nominations. It was also a big year for South Korean thriller Parasite, which got six nods as well, including for Best Picture, Director, and International Feature.

Below, here's all the nominations for the 92nd Academy Awards.

Motion Picture

Ford v Ferrari (Fox), Peter Chernin, Jenno Topping and James Mangold, Producers

The Irishman (Netflix), Martin Scorsese, Robert De Niro, Jane Rosenthal and Emma Tillinger Koskoff, Producers

Jojo Rabbit (Fox Searchlight), Carthew Neal and Taika Waititi, Producers

Joker (Warner Bros.), Todd Phillips, Bradley Cooper and Emma Tillinger Koskoff, Producers

Little Women (Sony), Amy Pascal, Producer

Marriage Story (Netflix), Noah Baumbach and David Heyman, Producers

1917 (Universal), Sam Mendes, Pippa Harris, Jayne-Ann Tenggren and Callum McDougall, Producers

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood (Sony), David Heyman, Shannon McIntosh and Quentin Tarantino, Producers

Parasite (Neon), Kwak Sin Ae and Bong Joon Ho, Producers

Actress

Cynthia Erivo (Harriet)

Scarlett Johansson (Marriage Story)

Saoirse Ronan (Little Women)

Charlize Theron (Bombshell)

Renée Zellweger (Judy)

Actor

Antonio Banderas (Pain and Glory)

Leonardo DiCaprio (Once Upon a Time in Hollywood)

Adam Driver (Marriage Story)

Joaquin Phoenix (Joker)

Jonathan Pryce (The Two Popes)

Actress in a Supporting Role

Kathy Bates (Richard Jewell)

Laura Dern (Marriage Story)

Scarlett Johansson (Jojo Rabbit)

Florence Pugh (Little Women)

Margot Robbie (Bombshell)

Actor in a Supporting Role

Brad Pitt (Once Upon a Time in Hollywood)

Al Pacino (The Irishman)

Joe Pesci (The Irishman)

Tom Hanks (A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood)

Anthony Hopkins (The Two Popes)

Director

Bong Joon Ho (Parasite)

Sam Mendes (1917)

Todd Phillips (Joker)

Martin Scorsese (The Irishman)

Quentin Tarantino (Once Upon a Time in Hollywood)

Adapted Screenplay

The Irishman (Steven Zaillian)

Jojo Rabbit (Taika Waititi)

Joker (Todd Phillips & Scott Silver)

Little Women (Greta Gerwig)

The Two Popes (Anthony McCarten)

Original Screenplay

1917 (Sam Mendes & Krysty Wilson-Cairns)

Knives Out (Rian Johnson)

Marriage Story (Noah Baumbach)

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood (Quentin Tarantino)

Parasite (Bong Joon Ho & Jin Won Han)

International Feature

Corpus Christi (Poland)

Honeyland (North Macedonia)

Les Misérables (France)

Pain and Glory (Spain)

Parasite (South Korea)

Documentary Feature

American Factory (Netflix), Steven Bognar, Julia Reichert and Jeff Reichert

The Cave (National Geographic), Feras Fayyad, Kirstine Barfod and Sigrid Dyekjaer

The Edge of Democracy (Netflix), Petra Costa, Joanna Natasegara, Shane Boris and Tiago Pavan

For Sama (PBS), Waad al-Kateab and Edward Watts

Honeyland (Neon), Ljubo Stefanov, Tamara Kotevska and Atanas Georgiev

Animated Feature Film

How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World (Dreamworks), Dean DeBlois, Bradford Lewis and Bonnie Arnold

I Lost My Body (Netflix), Jérémy Clapin and Marc du Pontavice

Klaus (Netflix), Sergio Pablos, Jinko Gotoh and Marisa Román

Missing Link (United Artists Releasing), Chris Butler, Arianne Sutner and Travis Knight

Toy Story 4 (Pixar), Josh Cooley, Mark Nielsen and Jonas Rivera

Production Design

The Irishman, Production Design: Bob Shaw; Set Decoration: Regina Graves

Jojo Rabbit, Production Design: Ra Vincent; Set Decoration: Nora Sopková

1917, Production Design: Dennis Gassner; Set Decoration: Lee Sandales

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, Production Design: Barbara Ling; Set Decoration: Nancy Haigh

Parasite, Production Design: Lee Ha Jun; Set Decoration: Cho Won Woo

Film Editing

Ford v Ferrari, Andrew Buckland & Michael McCusker

The Irishman, Thelma Schoonmaker

Jojo Rabbit, Tom Eagles

Joker, Jeff Groth

Parasite, Jinmo Yang

Cinematography

1917 (Roger Deakins)

The Irishman (Rodrigo Prieto)

Joker (Lawrence Sher)

The Lighthouse (Jarin Blaschke)

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood (Robert Richardson)

Visual Effects

1917

Avengers: Endgame

The Irishman

The Lion King

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker

Costume Design

The Irishman, Sandy Powell and Christopher Peterson

Jojo Rabbit, Mayes C. Rubeo

Joker, Mark Bridges

Little Women, Jacqueline Durran

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, Arianne Phillips

Sound Mixing

1917

Ad Astra

Ford v Ferrari

Joker

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood

Sound Editing

1917

Ford v Ferrari

Joker

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker

Original Song

"I Can't Let You Throw Yourself Away, " Toy Story 4, Music and Lyric by Randy Newman

"(I'm Gonna) Love Me Again," Rocketman, Music by Elton John; Lyric by Bernie Taupin

"I'm Standing With You," Breakthrough, Music and Lyric by Diane Warren

"Into The Unknown," Frozen II, Music and Lyric by Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez

"Stand Up," Harriet, Music and Lyric by Joshuah Brian Campbell and Cynthia Erivo

Original Score

Joker, Hildur Gudnadóttir

Little Women, Alexandre Desplat

Marriage Story, Randy Newman

1917, Thomas Newman

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker, John Williams

Makeup and Hairstyling

Bombshell, Kazu Hiro, Anne Morgan and Vivian Baker

Joker, Nicki Ledermann and Kay Georgiou

Judy, Jeremy Woodhead

Maleficent: Mistress of Evil, Paul Gooch, Arjen Tuiten and David White

1917, Naomi Donne, Tristan Versluis and Rebecca Cole

Live Action Short Film

Brotherhood

Nefta Football Club

The Neighbors' Window

Saria

A Sister

Animated Short Film

Dcera (Daughter), Daria Kashcheeva

Hair Love, Matthew A. Cherry and Karen Rupert Toliver

Kitbull, Rosana Sullivan and Kathryn Hendrickson

Memorabl, Bruno Collet and Jean-François Le Corree

Sister, Siqi Song

Documentary Short Subject

In the Absence, Yi Seung-Jun and Gary Byung-Seok Kam

Learning to Skateboard in a Warzone (If You're a Girl), Carol Dysinger and Elena Andreicheva

Life Overtakes Me, John Haptas and Kristine Samuelson

St. Louis Superman, Smriti Mundhra and Sami Khan

Walk Run Cha-Cha, Laura Nix and Colette Sandstedt

FILM

Why the Continuous Tracking Shot in "1917" Is More Than Just a Gimmick

1917's "single long take" aesthetic makes for one of the most tense war movies ever made.

Universal Pictures

There are very few movie scenes that have any right being shot in one continuous take, let alone entire movies.

Typically, movies aim to absorb their viewers in the content of their story and action. Long takes are distracting because, by contrast, they draw attention to the camerawork and editing––or lack thereof. Many directors, especially those who fancy themselves "auteurs," like long takes because of their visual and technical difficulty. But great long takes don't exist solely for prestige amongst film buffs. No, the best long takes work in service of the larger story and themes at play in the movie.

For instance, the tricycle scene in The Shining serves to disorient the audience as they try to piece together the impossible layout of the Overlook Hotel. The hallway scene in Oldboy mirrors the arduous gauntlet of Oh Dae-su's path to revenge. And Birdman, an entire movie meant to look like one long take (it's actually multiple shorter long takes, expertly cut together), is reflective of its leading man's transition from film to live theater.

Much like Birdman, director Sam Mendes' World War I epic, 1917, isn't actually a movie made in a single take, but rather multiple long takes with clever editing. But, perhaps even more than Birdman, 1917 doesn't just look like a single take. It feels like one. And while the concept of a feature-length war movie that looks like a single long take might sound like a gimmick, 1917 proves the narrative value of its visual direction beyond a shadow of a doubt.

1917 has a relatively straightforward premise: During WWI, two young British soldiers stationed in France––Lance Corporals Tom Blake (Dean Charles-Chapman, Tommen Baratheon in Game of Thrones) and William Schofield (George MacKay)––are tasked with the mission of hand-delivering a letter to the 2nd Battalion in order to call off a planned attack on the Germans.

What proceeds is one of the tensest war movies I've ever seen, and that's owed in large part to the single take aesthetic. Normally, a well-composed series of shots encompass all the information we need to know at any particular moment in a movie, directing our eyes to the things we need to be paying attention to.

1917 Universal Pictures

But as the boys leave the relative safety of their trenches and venture out into No Man's Land, the camera slowly tracks them across a wide expanse of space with no particular direction in which we should be looking. This results in a constant feeling of tension, as we know the danger is ever-present, but we never know where it might be coming from. In a sense, the camerawork puts the viewer into the headspace of the soldiers, always scanning the landscape for threats.

In a similar vein, the single long take treats all aspects of the movie in a similar manner, gliding along with a slow track, sometimes moving in close, sometimes circling the area, but never speeding up past the gait of Blake and Schofield. This means that both light-hearted conversations and intense moments of action move at roughly the same pace. Doing so strips away some of the audience's most basic movie instincts.

For example, during the first stretch of the movie, which sees Blake and Schofield crossing through No Man's Land and an abandoned German trench, the boys don't encounter a single enemy combatant. Eventually, after they make it out of the German trench, Blake recounts a funny story as they walk through the woods.

Compared to the danger of the German trench, the woods feel much safer, but the contrast puts anyone well-versed in plot structure on their toes: If the trench seemed dangerous but nobody was there, then perhaps the woods will hold the real danger, ready to emerge during a moment of downtime when we finally feel safe. But nope. The boys make it through their conversation in the woods without a hitch and proceed to the next leg of their journey.

1917 Universal Pictures

Eventually, when battle scenes do occur, the long take style enhances the experience, as well. With the camera sticking to a single person, we get the chance to navigate battlescapes right alongside him. His danger is our danger. His enemies are our enemies. In other words, the long shot doesn't just function to show us battles, but make us invest in them.

1917 isn't a movie content with just depicting a war story. It requires our participation. By watching and following Blake and Schofield's journey, we enter the headspace of soldiers on a perilous mission right alongside them. So while 1917 is most certainly an impressive, ambitious act of technical filmmaking, it also offers an incredible narrative for which the technical elements serve a greater purpose. After experiencing 1917, it's hard not to wonder whether traditional film editing has been the real gimmick all along.