Aubrey Drake Graham was born on October 24, 1986.

He found fame at a young age as one of the stars of the hit Canadian teen drama Degrassi. After his tenure playing Jimmy Brooks, he would transition from the screen to the booth, pursuing a full-time career as a musician.

Drake released a few mixtapes that were received well by fans and blogs, but it was the mixtape "So Far Gone" in February 2009 that would change his life and the course of music forever.

Since then, he would continue to shatter Billboard records, helping establish a sound that has since become the standard in Hip-Hop and has even transcended the genre itself. The keys to Drake's success are his talent, relentless work ethic, and his versatility as an artist.

Keep Reading Show less
Culture Feature

This Haunts Me: JD and the Straight Shot vs. the NY Knicks

Owner James L. Dolan's cringey vanity project may be one of the biggest obstacles to the Nicks's success.

Once upon a time the New York Knicks were considered a real basketball team.

Led by Hall-of-Famer Patrick Ewing from the late '80s to the year 2000, the team was a genuine rival for the likes of the '90s Chicago Bulls, making 13 consecutive playoff appearances and making it to the NBA Finals in 1994 and 1999.

Keep Reading Show less

In my life, there have been two celebrity deaths that shook me to the core. Those were the deaths of Nipsey Hussle and Kobe Bryant.

Keep Reading Show less

Hip-Hop legend Snoop Dogg is rap's cool uncle.

Keep Reading Show less
TV

Why Women In Sports Need #WomenInSports

This is what it is to be one of the #WomenInSports: It is a duality of being pushed down and lifted up solely because of our gender.

Erin Andrews, Joy Taylor, Jourdan Rodrigue and Jessica Kleinschmidt illustrate the experiences women face in the sports industry.

On December 2nd, the Baltimore Ravens and Pittsburgh Steelers played against one another in a rugged divisional matchup. Millions of Americans tuned in as announcer Cris Collinsworth intended to pay a compliment to an impressive group of Steelers fans he met. They just so happened to be women.

Keep Reading Show less
CULTURE

NBA Players Are Doing More for Racial Equity Than Congress

In regards to the Black Lives Matter movement and achieving racial equality, athletes are a leading voice, especially for America's youth.

An empty court where the NBA playoffs were set to continue on Wednesday night in the Orlando bubble

Getty Images

The shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin on Sunday reignited the embers still burning from the death of George Floyd just three months ago.

Once again, athletes have joined activist groups calling for justice and reform to prevent these types of occurrences from being so common in our society. On Wednesday, NBA teams started a movement that extended to other sports (including the NFL, MLB, and WNBA), all cancelling games and practices in light of the incident that has left Jacob Blake paralyzed from one of seven bullets fired into his back by a Wisconsin police officer from point blank range, one of them severing his spinal cord.

The Milwaukee Bucks were the first team to announce that they would not participate in their playoff game on Wednesday. The team addressed the media with a unified statement explaining how and why they came to their decision. George Hill and Sterling Brown acted as spokespeople for the organization, and shortly after the league made the decision to postpone all games on the schedule for that day.

Hill stated, "Over the last few days in our home state of Wisconsin, we've seen the horrendous video of Jacob Blake being shot in the back seven times by a police officer in Kenosha, and the additional shooting of protestors. Despite the overwhelming plea for change, there has been no action, so our focus today cannot be on basketball."

Keep Reading Show less