MUSIC

Real Estate Grapple With an Existential Crisis on "The Main Thing"

The New Jersey band's fifth album is out this week.

Jake Michaels

It's been over a decade since Real Estate released their self-titled debut album, effectively staking their claim in the trendy wave of beachy, hazy indie rock that rose around 2010.

But in the years since forming his band, frontman Martin Courtney admits he's faced an existential crisis. "[I was] wondering if being an artist is irresponsible or selfish, particularly with the world in the state that it's in, particularly as a parent of young kids," he explained in a statement. It's a feeling that drives "The Main Thing," the new title track from Real Estate's upcoming fifth studio album.

"Despite the crushing weight / Of all that's on our plate / Despite the true significance of / Everything at stake / I will stay true," Courtney croons over the song's sunkissed guitar riffs. The "main thing" that motivates him is his love for music, a passion that guides him even when doubt and difficulties try to steer him off course. "It's all I can do / The main, main thing."

Though its structure and lyricism are simple, "The Main Thing" serves as a compass. When you feel as though your work is inadequate or inconsequential, the song implies, following what makes you happy through it all is the best way to come out on top.

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Music Features

On This Day: Shakira Liberated Everyone's “She Wolf”

"I was in the studio in a bad mood that day, then I got inspired and went to a corner and I wrote the lyrics and the melody in 10 minutes. The image of the she wolf just came to my head, and when I least expected it I was howling and panting," Shakira said.

By Fabio Alexx

11 years ago, on July 10th, 2009, Colombian singer Shakira released the first single off her third studio album.

"She Wolf" is a synth-pop banger built on a B minor progression. It was, in many ways, an insane song, born out of the singer's own frustration and ennui.

"I was in the studio in a bad mood that day, then I got inspired and went to a corner and I wrote the lyrics and the melody in 10 minutes. The image of the she wolf just came to my head, and when I least expected it I was howling and panting," Shakira said.

Though the music was composed by John Hill and Sam Endicott, lead singer of post-punk band The Bravery, the lyrics were all Shakira's own. "[Shakira] contacted him (Hill), asking if he had any stuff," said Endicott. "We never had her in mind. We just made the thing independently of her, and then she liked it a lot, and she sang over it. She used some of the melodies we put in there and then wrote these crazy lyrics about being a werewolf. And that's how it happened."

Shakira - She Wolf www.youtube.com


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MUSIC

UK Band Sorry Are the Future of Indie Rock with "More"

It's the latest song from the band's upcoming debut album.

Sorry are tricky to pin down.

The U.K. band, whose ascent began around 2018 with their initial singles like "Showgirl" and "Starstruck," are an amalgamation of standard indie rock and modern electronica. With dashes of psychedelic funk and dreamy fuzz, Sorry exist in a space of their own, straddling the lines between underground punk of the past and experimental pop of the future. Whichever genre they fit in—if any—they're an exciting group to watch.

Sorry just announced their debut album slated for release in March, and "More" is their latest offering off the new project. Built off simple, to-the-point lyricism—"don't give me too much, too much, too much / Just give me enough," vocalist Asha Lorenz repeats tauntingly—it exudes a ramshackle attitude that's become synonymous with Sorry and the grungy London club scene that bred them.

"More" has the bones of a pop song, though its forward-facing guitars reflect punky origins, and the entire track bears a woozy sense of distortion. It proves how malleable Sorry are and presents a forecast of how indie rock could evolve in the not-too-distant future.

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