There's a particular kind of pleasure that comes from watching a former Disney star fall.

From Lindsay Lohan to Miley Cyrus, so many of our childhood icons have shocked us time and time again as they shirk off their guises of innocence.

Few have taken a choppier plummet than Bella Thorne. Since she starred on the Disney show Shake It Up with Zendaya, she's gone on to surprise us with her frank discussions of sexuality and chaotic relationships with women, men, and sometimes both at the same time. She's been embroiled in a number of controversies, most recently involving leaked nude photos that earned the ire of none other than Whoopi Goldberg.

Her latest project pushes things to a new level. At 21, Thorne can add "director" to her resume—director of a adult film, that is. She has now directed her first explicit film as part of Pornhub's Visionaries Director's series.

Entitled Her & Him, the film seems to have gone through many iterations before reaching its final form. In a behind-the-scenes video about the project, Thorne stated that the film began as a Christmas-themed horror movie, but instead turned into something "beautiful and ethereal."

Still from 'Her and Him'Image via Metro

Wait, what? How does an explicit film go from a Christmas-themed horror movie to a story that "depicts an edgy twenty-something guy who stumbles upon a surprise text in his girlfriend's phone, interrupting their morning routine and spinning everything into an out-of-control sexually charged encounter," according to the film's press release?

It seems that the film has been brewing in Thorne's brain for a while, so it's had plenty of time to metamorphosize. "I'm really lucky that Pornhub wanted to come on and produce this with me because originally I was shopping it around a very long time ago and things were very different," she said. "People are kind of scared to make a movie like this one when it comes to dominance and submissive(ness) between a male and a female and how this relationship can turn quite sour." The film features a large knife, apparently, as well as a Romeo and Juliet-like relationship that "transcends time and space," according to Thorne.

This isn't the only creative project that she's been involved in recently. On July 23, she released her book, The Life of a Wannabe Mogul: Mental Disarray. The book features scraps of poetry, printed typewriter-style, detailing her struggles with sexual abuse, depression, dyslexia, and more; it quickly became an international bestseller. "I constantly wonder how I'm so OK because sometimes I get lost in my thoughts of all of the darkness that I've kind of been through, and I wonder where I would be if I wasn't me," she said at the time of the book's release. But she emphasized the importance of a pliable mindset, stating, "You change your mind, you change your opinion, you change your whole entire mindset, and that's OK because you live, you learn, you get older and you decide differently."

She has a multitude of new projects in the work. "I've got like two movies coming out, I'm about to film like four movies back-to-back, I have an album coming out with Sony, I want to start working on the second book, I'm writing a TV series I hope to direct, I'm doing a weed brand and I'm redoing my makeup line (Thorne by Bella), head to toe. I'm always out here hustling," she added.

While her endeavors might seem increasingly unexpected, and are indicative of an unstable sense of self, overall, Thorne is turning herself into quite the accomplished and subversive character. Unafraid to depict sexual topics with some nuance and vision, open about her sexuality and mental health, and unabashedly unashamed of who she is, Thorne's actions make her a refreshing contrast to stars who make shows out of their flashy lives, unattainable appearances, and opulent wealth. While her descent from Disney stardom might seem like a fall from grace, perhaps it's an ascension in its own way—a shift from the constraints of having to present as a "good girl" and a movement towards a wilder selfhood that's empowering in its own right.

Perhaps she's not a great role model for young girls, but perhaps the world isn't so kind to young girls as it is—and seeing a young woman so unafraid to turn the scars that the world has given her into art (even when it's Christmas horror-flick-turned-knifeplay) definitely can't be as harmful as some of the sponsored posts that float around Instagram today.

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CULTURE

From Freud to Bella Thorne: What Is Pansexuality?

"I like sexy girls, I like sexy guys. I like sexy in general, you know?"

Sexuality is confusing, especially if you turn to the 21-year-old "wannabe mogul" Bella Thorne for explanations.

While appearing on Good Morning America to promote her new book, Life of a Wannabe Mogul: Mental Disarray, she declared, "I'm actually pansexual and I didn't know that. Somebody explained to me very thoroughly what that is." The actress continued, "[Pansexuals] like beings. You like what you like. It doesn't have to be a girl or a guy or a he or she or they or that—it's literally, you like a personality. You just like a being."

The LGBTQ+ term has become more common since 2018, which was deemed "the year of the pansexual," with Merriam-Webster spotlighting the orientation on their Words of the Year list. It was thanks, in part, to singer Janelle Monáe coming out in a Rolling Stone interview in April, when she explained, "I read about pansexuality and was like, 'Oh, these are things that I identify with too.' I'm open to learning more about who I am." Soon afterwards, searches for the term spiked—and continue to do so, as we keep turning to Dr. Google to understand non-heternormative identities.

pansexuality is valid "Alexa: Are you pansexual?"Nexis Uni data

Merriam-Webster defines "pansexual" as "of, relating to, or characterized by sexual desire or attraction that is not limited to people of a particular gender identity or sexual orientation." As for Thorne, she simply says, "I like sexy girls, I like sexy guys. I like sexy in general, you know?

Well, that's not all there is to pansexuality. Despite being coined by Sigmund Freud in 1914, the word wasn't used to describe a sexual orientation until the 1980s. Of course, there have been individuals all throughout history who have loved regardless of "labels and boundaries." Then the sexual revolution and free love subculture created enough activism and visibility that pansexuality was given its own letter in the queer community's "alphabet soup": LGBTTQQIAAP (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, transsexual, queer, questioning, intersex, asexual, ally, pansexual).

And we get it: That's a lot of representation, a lot of separate politics, a lot of colorful banners, and an uneasy responsibility not to possibly offend anyone if you don't know the definition and history of each letter. Luckily, that's what the Internet is for.

The foremost questions that come to mind when discussing pansexuality are usually: "How is that different from bisexuality? Says who? And does it really matter? #LoveIsLove" While that's fair, as with most words attempting to describe the immeasurable gamut of human behavior, the meaning of the word is complicated and weird and constantly in flux. But it's mostly about intent. Generally speaking, that's how we end up with so many synonyms in the English language when they all mean the same thing. We mainly adapt new words to assimilate the history of that word into our culture. We can call someone "funny" or, let's say, "comical." But "comical" is a boring direct descendant from the Latin word comicus (a writer of comedy, a comic actor, or comedian), whereas "funny" is an odd colloquialism from the good old American South in the 1800s, which denoted anything from a "tingling sensation" to "mental hospital"—which makes the word not only more diverse but also hilarious.


The point is: "Bisexual" creates the clear distinction that someone is attracted to two genders (usually cisgenders, indicating individuals who identify as the gender they were assigned at birth). The problem is that excludes any non-cisgender individuals. Growing awareness of trans, nonbinary, and genderqueer identities and the discrimination they still face today (both legally and socially) gives the inclusivity of "alphabet soup" grave importance.

pansexual credit: "Jane"Pinterest

Rolling Stone points out that there's plenty of debate about the necessity of a pansexual orientation within the LGBTQ+ community itself. Some agree with the Bisexual Resource Center's Gabrielle Blonder, who says, "I personally like the historical aspect of it. It's the label we've fought for recognition under for decades, and it's the most widely-known label. Language isn't a static entity, and words can change meaning over time...I believe the term bisexual has morphed into a different meaning than it originally was." Similarly, Ethan Remillard, 22, who came out as bisexual in his early teens, bluntly stated, "I identify as bisexual because I like f**king dudes and romancing girls. But I don't claim pansexuality because trans[gender] girls and boys are the same as their cis[gender] counterparts."

While that's true, others acknowledge that they do respond differently to trans and genderqueer individuals as a form of respect for their separate expressions of gender. Daniel Saynt, founder of the private club NSFW, says, "I've definitely met attractive trans and non-conforming individuals, but the feelings I have [for them have] never been sexual in nature." Saynt adds, "It's more of an appreciation for who they are, what they represent, and just a desire for them to find happiness regardless of identity."

Medium

Ultimately, "pansexual" doesn't just include trans, nonbinary, and genderqueer individuals as valid subjects of sexual attraction; it signals that they're attractive because of their specific expression of gender(s), not despite it.

As RuPaul's Drag Race alum Courtney Act told Attitude, "It's important to acknowledge bisexual, pansexual. We have such a rigid idea of what heterosexuality is, and that's problematic. We have such a rigid idea of what gay is, and that's also problematic." So Bella Thorne may be the latest high profile figure to discuss pansexuality, but she joins a growing cohort including Janelle Monáe, Panic! At the Disco frontman Brendon Urie, Miley Cyrus, Orange is the New Black star Asia Kate Dillon (who also identifies as non-binary and uses the pronouns "they/their"), and teenage trans-activist and reality star Jazz Jennings.

More importantly, up to 25 percent of Americans identify as not "completely heterosexual," and at least 4.5 percent of U.S. adults identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender. It's true that the mouthful of acronyms in the LGBTQ+ community is clumsy, always changing, and difficult to grasp, but so is human behavior. Language is still trying to catch up with today's enlightened reality that gender is a social construct, sexuality is fluid, and everybody can get it on with anybody (or no one, if that's what they prefer), as long as it's between two (or three, or five, or ten) consenting adults.