CULTURE

Why Is Bruce Willis Quarantining with Ex-Wife Demi Moore?

The family clearly has a fun time together, but how does this work?

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Bruce Willis and Demi Moore were married for 13 years, from 1987-2000.

Since that time they have both remarried, Moore in an ill-fated union with Ashton Kutcher (16 years her junior) and Willis to his current wife Emma Heming Willis (24 years his junior). So why, 20 years after their divorce, are Moore and Willis not only spending time together but quarantining as a family?

The easy answer is that they just seem to get along. They have three daughters together and have maintained a friendly relationship that seems to have made it much easier to co-parent. On Willis' recent birthday Moore even posted an old family photo on Instagram showing the five of them together with the message "Happy birthday Bruce! Thank you for the three greatest gifts of my life." Apart from their children and a desire to marry people born in 1978, the former couple generally seem to have a lot in common, and the family has been getting up to some silly fun while quarantining together—including taking dressing up in matching pajamas (with a giant fork and spoon for some reason), and gathering around while Bruce Willis gives their daughter Tallulah Willis a buzz cut.

A more complicated answer might be that there's some drama at the Willis house that drove Bruce to seek some other shelter. Is his wife or one of their young daughters sick, necessitating Willis—who just turned 65—to get some distance? Or was the stress of spending all day in close confines with a five and eight-year-old getting to be too much? At 41, Emma Heming Willis might have more energy and patience for their young children than Bruce. It could be that his mental health was more at risk than his physical health, and he needed to get away for a bit. Adult children are certainly less likely to run around the house screaming and knocking things over.

Of course, this is all speculation. Moore and Willis haven't offered a public explanation for staying together during the quarantine, and there might be no explanation at all—Willis might have just decided to go over for a visit. Though if that's the case, someone really needs to explain the term "quarantine." Whatever the case, Emma Heming Willis doesn't seem to be too concerned. She commented on the video of Tallulah's new haircut that the 26-year-old "got the good head shape gene and then some."

MUSIC

Not Everyone Should Have a Music Career: The 10 Worst Celebrity Songs

Just because someone can act, that does not mean they can sing.

Gwyneth Paltrow - Country Strong

All too often, when a celebrity's head gets too big for their own good, their inflated brain decides they have what it takes to have a music career.

Technically, they're right––the only thing anyone actually needs to produce an album is cold, hard cash. But all the money in the world can't buy musical talent, which is why pretty much every celebrity album is screaming ear cancer. Come delight in making fun of people who are so wealthy that they fail to realize they have zero musical ability. These celebrity songs are truly the worst of the worst:

Jeremy Renner - Heaven Don't Have a Name

If anyone ever had a fever dream where Hawkeye from the Avengers sang a ripoff of Imagine Dragons' "Radioactive" that was somehow worse than "Radioactive," we're sorry to inform them that their nightmare has become a reality.

Heaven Don't Have a Name www.youtube.com

Brie Larson - She Said

Brie Larson's horrendous attempt at an Avril impression features inspired lyrics like "La dee da, la dee dee," along with a really poor Napoleon Dynamite impersonator in the music video.

Brie Larson - She Said (Radio Edit) www.youtube.com

Lindsay Lohan - Confessions Of A Broken Heart (Daughter to Father)

While "daddy issues" may be a sexist trope at this point, it's hard to describe Lindsay Lohan's music as indicative of anything else. "Confessions Of A Broken Heart (Daughter To Father)" is less a "song" and more a "desperate cry for help."

Lindsay Lohan - Confessions Of A Broken Heart (Daughter To Father) www.youtube.com

Paris Hilton - Nothing In This World

Based on sound alone, Paris Hilton's Nothing In This World is honestly pretty generic pop. But this music video...just wow. It's about a little, toad-faced, creeper kid who gets straight up abused at school and then goes home to spy on his hot adult neighbor (Paris Hilton, of course) while she undresses. Then she grinds on him a bunch in her underwear. This is horrifying because he's like 13-year-old, max.

Paris Hilton - Nothing In This World www.youtube.com

Bruce Willis - Respect Yourself

"Respect Yourself" is kind of like Aretha Franklin's "Respect" except instead of being sung by one of the most talented vocalists to ever live, it's sung by action star Bruce Willis and also has kind of weird religious undertones.

Respect Yourself ~ Bruce Willis www.youtube.com

Steven Seagal - Girl It's Alright

Steven Seagal has been hit with multiple accusations of sexual assault over the years, and this song is not helping his case at all.

Stiven Seagal "Girl it's alright" www.youtube.com

Gwyneth Paltrow - Country Strong

If Gwyneth Paltrow's "Country Strong" were revealed to be a parody of country music that she made solely because she despises poor people and anything that might interest them, it would be easy to believe.

Gwyneth Paltrow - Country Strong www.youtube.com

Heidi Montag - Blackout

Heidi Montag writhing around a pool in a bikini while shouting crappy, off-key, bubblegum pop directly into a camera is somehow the pinnacle of both blandness and grossness at the same time.

Heidi Montag - Blackout (Official Video) www.youtube.com

Robert Downey Jr. - Man Like Me

To Robert Downey Jr.'s credit, these vocals are raw, untouched by fancy audio effects that might possibly make his voice anything close to listenable. Because truly, his vocals are unlistenable. This is homeless man singing on the subway bad.

Robert Downey Jr. sings "Man like Me" www.youtube.com

Hulk Hogan - I Want to Be a Hulkamaniac

Okay, now this is epic. Hulk Hogan's "I Want to Be a Hulkamaniac" transcends the good-bad binary. It is a portal to another era, a simpler time when maybe someone really did want to be a "Hulkamaniac" but wasn't sure how to make that dream a reality. Luckily, Hulk Hugan was there to talk-rap instructions, encouraging listeners to take vitamins, say no to drugs, and have fun with family and friends. This actually might be the best celebrity song ever.

Hulk Hogan- I Want to Be a Hulkamaniac www.youtube.com

Film Reviews

"Glass" Is Enjoyable If You Don’t Get Your Hopes Up

"Glass" is not a comic book movie. It's not a bleak DC slog, and it's not a Marvel action clusterfuck. It's a suspensful character-led drama with supernatural themes, and in that sense it's unique... if not a little disappointing.

M. Night Shyamalan was maligned for ten years between 2004 and 2014 for serving up box office catastrophes, but since 2015 he seems to be back to form.

Both The Visit and Split were critically successful despite their modest budgets, and fans have been happy to invite Shyamalan back into their good graces in recent years. Then comes Glass, the sequel no fan knew they wanted until it was teased at the end of Split. Not just one of Shyamalan's most beloved films was getting a sequel—but now he'd put together a trilogy starring David Dunn, Mr. Glass, and The Beast. The stage was set for a full-on fan service delight, and it delivered—on the surface.

Film Title: Glass

Certain fans will notice that Mr. Glass isn't in the movie much. The movie is called Glass, but he doesn't say a word until well past the first hour mark. We don't get to see him working behind the scenes or plotting a scheme before then either. He's just sitting in a wheelchair. That's not to say that Samuel L. Jackson doesn't bring his all to this character. He embodies Elijah Price just as thoroughly as he did in Unbreakable, but he can only do so much with what he's given, which ultimately, wasn't much.

So what is this movie about? Well, Dr. Ellie Staple (played by Sarah Paulson) apprehends David Dunn and The Beast (played by Bruce Willis and James McAvoy, respectively) and is charged with convincing them that they are not superhuman; they are, in fact, delusional. Meanwhile, Mr. Glass has a plan he's been waiting to hatch—and The Beast might have a part to play, too.

The stand-out performance comes from James McAvoy, who plays The Beast, as well as Kevin Crumb and multiple other personalities we are introduced to throughout the movie. This is really The Beast's movie, and McAvoy is a spectacle to behold. In Split, we experienced a handful of Crumb's personalities, but this time we get to see 13 identities all brimming with charisma and perplexity. McAvoy skillfully transitions from one persona to the next in a masterclass of acting. The movie is worth watching just for these scenes alone.

Bruce Willis is in this movie, too, and darn it if he isn't acting his heart out—at least as much as he's capable of doing these days. He's stiff, awkward, and unconvincing, but there's a sincerity in his performance that softens the heart a little. It really seems like he gives a shit. He's just not very good.

Film Title: Glass

The cinematography was flawless. At his best, Shyamalan has always utilized creative camera movements and angles that accentuate a scene, and Glass is no exception. Director of Photography Mike Gioulakis (It Follows, Split, Us) brings smooth, beautiful compositions to even the smallest moments. The slow-ish pacing of the script is completely masked by the fluid, sweeping camera movements that take us from scene to scene.

Still, we have to discuss the script, as it's easily the weakest element of the film. Shyamalan seems to have a very academic perspective on how people talk to each other (I call it "Sham-speak"), wherein one uses the utmost correct words rather than the most natural. As an example, there's a scene where Shyamalan has a cameo, and he's talking to Willis's character, David Dunn. It goes something like this:

SHYAMALAN

Hey, you look familiar—did you used to work at the old stadium a few years back?

DAVID DUNN

Yup, 30 years.

SHYAMALAN

Yeah, I recognize you. I used to hang around there in my youth. Ran with a tough crowd. But I turned it all around—positive thinking.

DAVID DUNN

*silence*

SHYAMALAN

*silence*

Reading that in your head, did it sound like a normal, organic conversation? Probably not. It's even worse on screen. You can look past the clunky dialog and awkward-as-hell pop-culture references, but it does take you out of the movie from time to time.

Film Title: Glass

If you loved Split, odds are you're going to like this movie. McAvoy's performance alone makes this film worth a casual view, but Unbreakable fans will be pleased to see Spencer Treat Clark and Charlayne Woodard reprising their roles as supporting characters. The dialogue is awkward, the cinematography is beautiful, and the twist ending might leave a bit to be desired. But if you go into the theater with an open mind and temper your expectations, you'll more than likely enjoy it.

Rating: ⚡⚡⚡


Ahmed Ashour is a media writer, tech enthusiast, and college student. He has a Twitter: @aahsure


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MUSIC

Reinventing the Cabaret Show with Rumer Willis

Dancing with the Stars winner turned Broadway leading lady turned... Cabaret singer? How Rumer Willis turned a step down into a major step up.

Liam Berry//

Popdust

The trajectory of a star is usually easy to track. The rise to fame, the big break, the golden age, and finally the victory of lap of hosting gigs and panel positions (or the embarrassing scramble to pay their debts). Cabaret shows are usually a part of the rise to fame, the moment of waiting for discovery, or they come at the end of the career as an artistic indulgence or a money-grab. So why would someone who's hitting their stride, like the Dancing with the Stars winning leading lady of Chicago, Rumer Willis, decide to embark on a cabaret-esque show tour?

One compelling answer for this question is that Rumer Willis puts on a damn good show.

Taking the stage shortly after midnight at a swanky midtown cocktail thrust, The Cutting Room, Rumer Willis mounted the stage with a casual confidence, saying a few broad words about love before breaking into a Dean Martin style "Sway (Dance with Me)."

Beyond being a top-notch cover, the song was a bit of a misdirection. Its reserved vocals and contained rhythm left me expecting a more traditional cabaret performance, one during which I would talk and eat and sometimes listen in the background to the show.

That would not, however, be the case with Rumer Willis' Over The Love show.

Willis held the audience totally accountable. She was funny, too, jabbing at the marriage/kids/picket fence culture of people her age. She covered the same topics as late 20s comedians do, with much of the same relatable grace. Above all she encouraged participation, telling us to cheer and jeer and "take pictures and stuff... but tag me because I'm building my empire."

The rest of show was packed with the immense talent of both Willis and her backing musicians. Delving into songs that required the sort of full-tilt belting for which she was praised in herChicago run, she showcased the formidable range of her voice. This came out especially strong on her cover of Amy Winehouse's You Know I'm No Good.

The band was incredible. A wild-maned drummer, dubbed "Birdy" by his fellow performers (real name Rod Humphreys), provided an absurdly tight rhythm for the show without sacrificing a hint of energy. Will Harrington tore up the piano riffs and made every interlude worth listening to. And singer Tye Blue came with it on light-hearted duets in addition to a spiritual intermission.

The show had an intimate feeling, friends and family of Willis were present, if not dominant, in the crowd. It was her friend Nicole's birthday so Willis and Blue brought her on stage for "Happy Birthday." This at times was so prevalent in the between-song monologues that I felt more like somebody's plus one at a wedding than an equally anonymous customer of the bar.As the feeling of intimacy increased, so did the willingness of Willis and Blue to go buckwild riffing and belting at every opportunity, giving the show a very special feeling of one-time-only experimentation.

Rumer Willis filled the rare artistic position of expanding on the form by working completely within it. This was, by all accounts, a cabaret show. But by no means was it boring or unoriginal. It was an excellent rendition of something that's been done before and will be done again. However, with her immense collection of talent, Willis made sure that no one will soon forget her contribution to the cocktail tradition.

Check out another picture below of Rumer Willis at The Cutting Room: