CULTURE

Jonah Hill, Tom Holland, Machine Gun Kelly, Pete Davidson, and the Art of Duo Dressing

Style icons are stepping out in twos to break the conventions of menswear

The menswear revival is in full swing. As gender expression becomes more playful amongst all genders, people are experimenting audaciously with garments and colors, and silhouettes.

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CULTURE

How to Get Billie Eilish's Baggy-Chic Look

From comfy sneakers to bulky chains, here's how to emulate the "bad guy" singer's best looks.

Aside from her buttery vocals and her record-setting Grammys sweep, Billie Eilish also stands out for her iconic, androgynous sense of style.

The 18-year-old pop star is immediately recognizable for her oversized, streetwear-inspired looks. Whether she's on stage riling up a crowd or walking the red carpet, Eilish likes her clothes loose and in bold colors and patterns. Her idol Tyler, the Creator likened her wardrobe to that of a quarterback, but, in reality, her roomy outfit choices are meant to distract critics from making inappropriate and sexist comments about her body: comfy and empowering.

Sadly, Eilish's budget can be a little out of range for most of us, but that doesn't mean average Joes can't participate in her baggy-chic attire. Here's just a few ways to emulate the "bad guy"'s best looks.

Start with the Sneakers

If there ever were a sneakerhead in pop music, it's Eilish, who sports comfy kicks no matter the occasion. But you don't have to shell out upwards of $1,000 for a pair of Balenciaga tennis shoes; the Adidas Falcons give off the same effect for a fraction of the price. You can get them in a versatile solid white like Eilish has here or in a bold color to make an extra statement.

Adidas Falcon Sneakers, $100

Simple Logos

There's something perfectly kitschy about the Playboy logo, whether it's in a singular giant graphic like Eilish sports here or in a repeated print. We think she'd approve of this sweatshirt from Playboy's collaboration with Missguided—just be sure to size up if you really want to get her look.

Playboy x Missguided Pink Repeat Print Oversized Hoodie Dress, $59

Snow-Ready Shades

More often than not, Eilish's eyewear looks better fit for the slopes than for the streets. But chunky goggles are an essential component to emulating her look whether or not you're in the snow. Opt for some with mirrored lenses that'll keep you looking sporty chic.

Roka CP-1X Performance Sunglasses, $215

Chunky Chains

You'd be hard pressed to find interview audio of Eilish where her statement jewelry isn't jingling in the background. When it comes to dangling bracelets and oversized rings, the more the merrier, but a simple layered chain necklace like this one is a good place to start.

Dolls Kill Subtle Intentions Lock Necklace, $15

Mad about Monochrome

May we never forget this marvelously massive all-blue look Eilish wore alongside her pals Tierra Whack and SZA. The easiest way to replicate her ensemble is to pick one color and run with it, the small business Big Bud Press is a great, sustainable resource for unisex jumpsuits and separates in each color of the rainbow. This blue one is a slightly more toned-down version of Eilish's look, but will still have you dreaming of Camp Flog Gnaw all day.

Big Bud Press Short Sleeve Jumpsuit, $172

A Boot

We're kidding, mostly.

Braceability Stress Fracture Walking Boot, $39.99

Just Have Fun With It

Eilish might've titled her debut EP Don't Smile at Me, but she never takes herself too seriously. The best part of her style is that all of her bold and billowy looks feel true to her personality. She can't be bothered to look "hot" or traditionally feminine—she's here for a good time, and no matter what outlandish accessory she's wearing, her looks prove she's always ready to have a blast.

MUSIC

Justin Bieber's "Yummy" Is an Absolute Ear Worm

Bieber's first song in five years is easy to listen to and impossible to ignore.

Justin Bieber has an uncanny ability to stir the pot even while minding his business.

Justin Bieber - Yummy (Lyric Video) www.youtube.com

The prodigious pop star's seemingly tumultuous marriage to Hailey Baldwin attracted a considerable amount of the spotlight in 2019 and made for one very popular but vanilla Vogue expose. When the glitter and sheen of celebrity was wiped away, Vogue's profile showed a pair of pretty normal 20-somethings dealing with conflicts that readers could at least partially relate to. The main takeaway: Marriage is already hard enough, and it's twice as hard when everyone's watching it unfold.

But the beauty of "Biebwin" is that they seem to really want to make their marriage work. They're taking their time, going to therapy, putting their respective grinds aside to reflect on themselves and on each other and what matrimony means in the context of international stardom. Now, as Bieber steps out to release his first new song in 5 years, the result is a lighthearted reflection on his relationship with his wife. "Fifty-fifty love the way you split it," Bieber croons on "Yummy," in reference to the duo's combined wealth and refusal to sign a prenup.

When inspected under a fine tooth comb, there's very little that sets the song apart from every other pop hit on the radio; it's got classic hip-hop stylings with a catchy pop chorus. "Yummy" will undoubtedly be successful in large part thanks to Bieber's name. Sure, it's undoubtedly catchy, but radio hits are easy for Bieber at this point; Purpose was chock-full of 'em. But Purpose was crafted from drama and tumult, as the singer was actively trying to rewrite his troubled narrative. "One thing they have learned is that they are pretty happy homebodies," wrote Vogue about the obviously transformed Bieber and Baldwin. Now that all that drama has passed, "Yummy" plays out rather comfortably in contrast and indicates that maybe Justin Bieber is finally content with relative normalcy.

The newest cover of Rolling Stone is a photo of Billie Eilish, captured in grainy relief by photographer Petra Collins.

Image via ET Canada

The article that accompanied the piece was titled, "How Petra Collins and Billie Eilish Subverted Female Pop Star Expectations for Their First 'Rolling Stone' Cover." In it, Eilish discusses her vision for the cover: the "literal opposite of what a Britney Spears cover was."

Eilish was referring to the 1999 Rolling Stone cover shot that featured a lingerie-clad Spears, splayed out on pink silk sheets. Petra Collins was immediately all over the idea. "We're gonna try to take photos of you as a person," she said.

Image via Rolling Stone

Apparently, taking photos of Eilish as a person rather than a sex object (or something like it) "subverted female pop star expectations." That's a shame, but it also reveals a disturbing truth. In 2019, merely showing a pop star wearing clothes is still radical.

If we're still lodged in the era of feminism when a woman wearing a shirt is revolutionary, then we have not progressed since the 1950s. What happened to all the awareness about the problems with slut-shaming? What happened to intersectional feminism? The point is that if a girl wearing clothes on the cover of a magazine is still fundamentally radical, then Houston, we have a problem.

Petra Collins' name has long been synonymous with the "female gaze," a term that was originally coined by Laura Mulvey in her essay "Visual Pleasure and the Narrative Cinema." Mulvey's essay was mostly about the "male gaze," the preeminent mode of cinematography that favors the desires and perspectives of men. She didn't actually define the female gaze; instead she merely called for a "counter cinema."

Artists leapt on the opportunity to create this "counter cinema," but few have been quite as successful in capitalizing on the "female gaze" as Petra Collins, whose dewy, neon-lit photos typically show girls wearing some variety of the same expression: a pensive, gloomy, blank stare. Her models are usually soft, vulnerable, pouting, drenched in colors and light, splayed out. Collins' work is about masturbation and period blood; her girls are tearstained, enmeshed in sweat or wedding veils, always illuminated. There's something sexual about Collins' work, something obsessed with the feminine and the female flesh.

Selena Gomez by Petra Collins, via High Snobiety

It's now 2019; Mulvey's essay was published in 1973. Is the female gaze—as seen by Petra Collins—still radical? Was it ever?

According to Emily Nussbaum, the female gaze as it is today is an "insight that has become blunt from overuse, particularly with its essentialist hint that women share one eye: a vision that is circular, mucky, menstrual, intimate, wise." In 2019, the problem with viewing this kind of female gaze as fundamentally radical is that at this point, this limited form of the (white, conventionally attractive, heterosexual) female gaze has been honored time and time again. A whole host of TV shows, from Sex and the City to Girls, has seen to this. White women have constantly been complicit in marginalization, and white, upper-middle-class women have reaped the majority of the benefits of traditional feminism, particularly during the first and second waves.

There's another problem with viewing Collins' work as radical and subversive. A great deal of Collins' work fixates on the archetypically "ideal" female form: the stick-thin, usually white frame. In 2017, Collins wrote an op-ed for the Huffington Post complaining about how Instagram deleted a photo of her that showed a thin line of pubic hair. Still, the most striking and central thing in that photo is not the faint line of unobtrusive public hair: it's the mannequin-like thinness of Collins' thighs. Her models aren't only often thin and white—they're often dangerously, unrealistically skinny, and the way she takes her photographs often highlights and emphasizes the body's size and shape.

Petra Collins via Jezebel

While she has photographed many diverse frames, her work remains obsessed with her own story. "Because so much of Collins's work is occupied with telling her own white, blonde, middle class story, we have to question if self-fashioning people of color in her own image accomplishes anything positive for representation," writes Hannah Simpson in Public Seminar.

Criticizing thin frames is dangerous territory, and skinny-shaming is real and problematic. Still, the modeling industry remains dominated by unhealthy bodily norms, and as a feminist photographer, Collins could do better—or media outlets should stop viewing her portraits like triumphs for the entire female gender. If we manage that, photographs that display women as people instead of decorative pieces could at last become the norm on magazine covers.

Image via Rolling Stone

All that said, it's not like Billie Eilish and Petra Collins' photoshoot deserves ire or that it shouldn't have happened. They are both extremely talented women who are doing important work. It's simply disappointing that Collins' work is still called subversive and that Eilish has had to work so hard to avoid sexualization. It shows how much more work there is to be done.