Culture News

Why Amazon's "Crucible" Game Needs to Fail

Crucible needs to fail. Thankfully, it already is.

Amazon

Boasting a massive budget, veteran talent sniped from some of the top gaming studios, and a gameplay experience tailor-made for Twitch streaming, Crucible represents Amazon's first major effort to break into the gaming industry as a first-party developer.

Presumably tired of just raking in all the money from third-part video games sales, Amazon, which straight-up owns Twitch, is hoping to replace streamer-favorite games like Fortnite, Overwatch, and League of Legends with their own. This is a major red flag for the future of video game streaming. A major company that controls advertisement space and means of distribution will most likely not play fair when they have their own content on the line, too. Amazon has already screwed over plenty of small business in all sorts of market spaces, and with their plans to create a cloud-based video game platform, it seems obvious that they're gearing up for a not-so-discreet monopoly in video games, too.

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Disney

Everybody loves Disney live-action remakes.

In a world plagued by racism, disease, and a seemingly endless bounty of spiraling misfortune, at least we can all agree that Disney knocks it out of the park every time they dredge up an old, animated movie for a live-action makeover because cartoons are for babies.

Sure, some of us thought the original Beauty and the Beast was fine, but could lame, 2D Belle ever hold a candle to 3D Emma Watson? And yeah, the original Lion King was okay, I guess, but there's nobody in the world who preferred cartoon Scar's rendition of "Be Prepared" to the incredible feat of getting a real lion to sing it in the live-action remake.

Being a Disney fan can be hard sometimes, as you have fond memories of beloved childhood movies but also don't want people to make fun of you for liking cartoons. That's why, out of all the corporations in the world, Disney is undoubtedly the most selfless, willing to spend hundreds of billions of dollars to bring their old, outdated movies into the modern age—all for the fans.

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