MUSIC

New Emily Rowed Video Captures Sound in Colors and Textures

The music video for the singer's latest single, "Watercolors," is a synesthetic feast for the eyes and ears.

Synesthesia is the phenomenon by which one of the five senses is experienced through the stimulation of a seemingly unrelated sense.

In other words, when a person claims that she is able to "see" a sound or "hear" a color, she is likely having a synesthetic experience. Much is still unknown about the phenomenon, other than the fact that it's rare. Vancouver-based singer, Emily Rowed, however, seems to have a strong sense of synesthesia, evidenced by her latest music video, "Watercolors."

The video was shot at the 604 Records Soundstage studio and is based on the way Rowed claims to experience the song. In a written statement, she describes her initial vision as "an effortless, flowing love that came out of nowhere. Everything turned into sweet purples and vintage film." And, with the help of director, Daniel Keen, that is exactly what the video became – a blend of soft purple and blue lights drench Rowed as she sings beside her keyboardist and in front of her drummer's silhouette. The video captures this intimate and minimalistic performance, alternating between long shots of Rowed swaying and singing with the band and jarring cuts to grainy film filters and glitchy, VHS-inspired effects that quickly slice the images into disembodied blurs. The overall effect is one that perfectly mirrors the play between soft and sharp, smooth and rough, characteristic of the song.

"Watercolors" is the latest single from Rowed's latest full-length album, April, which dropped on April 12th. And if the rest of April is anything like what Rowed's painted for us with this single, the album is sure to be brimming with audible color.

Emily Rowed - Watercolors (Live) www.youtube.com



Dustin DiPaulo is a writer and musician from Rochester, New York. He received his MFA in Creative Writing from Florida Atlantic University and can most likely be found at a local concert, dive bar, or comedy club (if he's not getting lost somewhere in the woods).


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