CULTURE

Lizzo, Zendaya, and Abbot Elementary - Black Excellence Won at the Historic 2022 Emmys

Who won at the Emmys? Lizzo, Zendaya for Euphoria, The Abbott Elementary Cast, Jerrod Carmichael, and more Black Excellence

Zendaya, an angel, and her Historic Emmy win

via Shutterstock

To be honest, I forgot about the Emmys. Okay, to be honest, I always forget about the Emmys.

But who can blame me? It’s been a big few weeks in Hollywood. The Don’t Worry Darling drama — I won’t rehash it here … but we’re worrying. And the rest of the Venice Film Festival, the beginning of New York Fashion Week, the My Policeman premiere at Toronto International Film Festival (Harry content, so obviously, I couldn’t look away). AND the death of Queen of England.

Phew! It’s been a week.

But there I was, doomscrolling my evening away, when I saw an angel. It was Zendaya, at her red carpet best strutting about in a classic Valentino gown. I literally let out a gasp. But what was this for? A movie premiere? Fashion week? Is it the Dune 2 Premiere already?

No — it was the Emmys. And wait … hold on … you’ll never guess … but they were actually kind of good?

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Steve Martin, Martin Short, and Selena Gomez on the poster for Only Murders In The Building, now streaming on Hulu.

Disney Plus

Way back in 2007, Selena Gomez stole my heart as Alex in Wizards of Waverly Place. I related hard to her sarcasm and standoffish ways and I still aspire to be the last wizard standing with a hot werewolf boyfriend.

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TV News

The 5 Best and Worst Moments of the 2021 Emmys

The 73rd Primetime Emmy Awards were LIVE last night

Schitts Creek Emmys 2021

The 73rd Primetime Emmy Awards were LIVE last night, and, as is the case with many awards shows recently, it was filled with moments that were both cringey and rewarding.

We admit that it was kind of nice seeing a bunch of people gathered safely in a room again. But from another whitewashed winning streak to a bizarre ode to the "sexiness" of chess, here are a few moments from last night's ceremony's that were either appalling or worth applauding.


Best: An Awkward Schitts Creek Reunion

After sweeping the comedy category of the 2020 Emmys, the Rose family reunited this year for a hilarious back and forth bit that should have been nominated for an Emmy itself. "Thank you so much, there's nothing on the prompter," Dan Levy began. "Is there a tech guy or something?" Annie Murphy asked.

As the cast fumbled to make the most out of an awkward situation, the back and forth between them slowly revealed that Eugene Levy had caused the writers to pull all of their lines after he pissed them off. Considering most of the ceremony's other comedy bits were atrocious this year, this awkward Schitts Creek reunion was a much needed moment of levity.

Worst: A Lack of Diversity...Again

Ted Lasso Emmys

Ted Lasso Emmys

After once again blabbing on about championing artists and stories of color, the Emmys once again awarded most of their awards to white talent. Pose, The Underground Railroad, and others were severely overlooked. Sure, Cedric the Entertainer was the host, and the nominations weren't nearly as white-washed as they have been in the past, but the ceremony was still rank with white privilege.

For example, in an awkward show of said privilege, The Queen Gambit's Scott Frank ordered that Emmy producers cease their lead-out music, for which they happily obliged. By the time Michela Cohen got her long-overdue award, it all felt rather tokenizing.

Best: Michela Cohen's Award

But that tokenization did not in any way diminish the award itself! Michela Cohen, who was cheated out of a Golden Globe nomination and other well deserved awards earlier this year, finally won an award for her critically-lauded masterpiece I May Destroy You. After two hours of predictable victories for many of the (white) shows this year, Coel snagged a win for Outstanding Writing for a Limited Series or Movie. Her speech was to the point and beautifully concise, and she dedicated her award to the survivors of sexual assault.

Worst: That Weird "Queen's Gambit" Speech

Queens Gambit

Queens Gambit

While The Queen's Gambit was one of the most widely watched shows of the year, the Outstanding Limited Series/Movie winner this year resulted in one of the oddest acceptance speeches of the night. While accepting the award, the show's producer thanked star Anya Taylor-Joy for bringing the "sexy back to chess," before going into tearing down the patriarchy.

It was an odd thing to praise someone for — not to mention that diluting a female artist's contribution down to just being sexy is right in line with what the patriarchy has done and continues to do?

Best: The Bizarre Biz Markie Tribute

When Cedric the Entertainer kicked off the show, he dove into a hilarious and charming parody of Biz Markie's hit "Just a Friend." Meant as an ode to the rapper, who died in July of this year, Cedric roped in other celebrities from around the room to partake in the song including Rita Wilson, who oddly stole the show with her cringe-worthy rapping abilities.

Every Emmys opening is undoubtedly awkward, but this year it was nice to see everyone in person having some fun and letting loose, even if the results were at times uncomfortable.

TV News

HBO "Euphoria's" Makeup Won an Emmy (and Zendaya Is Better Than All of Us)

HBO's "Euphoria" was honored for making mental illness and queer identity literally shine in the spotlight.

At just 24 years old, Zendaya has become the youngest Emmy winner for best lead actress–further proving that Gen Z is better at getting sh*t done.

Beating her fellow nominees Jennifer Aniston (The Morning Show) and Laura Linney (Ozark), Zendaya was honored for her performance in HBO's glitter-and-hormone-soaked Euphoria and made history at last night's Emmy Awards. She beat the prior record held by Jodie Comer, who won for her work in Killing Eve just last year–at the ripe old age of 26.

Perhaps these respective icons of Zoomer ennui and homicidal Millennial burnout are symbols that younger generations are finally assuming their own positions of power and using their collective voice to highlight issues that have been historically shamed and marginalized, such as mental illness and queer identity. Or maybe their makeup's just really pretty.

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TV

Could an At-Home Show Be a Turning Point for the Emmys?

'Watchmen' and 'Schitt's Creek' won big, but some snubs left fans feeling burned.

Emmys Nominations 2020

Last year, the Emmys logged its lowest viewer count ever.

Flash forward a year and the world has completely changed. A pandemic has shut down lingering dreams of a red carpet spectacle, and months of protests have re-terraformed the public dialogue about racial justice.

For many people, television has been a balm and a source of life during lockdown. Because of that, this year's Emmys could potentially be a turning point for the awards show, which—like many other awards shows—has felt increasingly out of touch over the past few years.


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TV Features

"Ramy" Creator Ramy Youssef Is Humble About His Show's Historic Emmy Nominations

The lovable young star and creator of Ramy was just nominated for Emmys for his acting and directing.

At just 29 years old, Ramy Youssef—not to be confused with his character Ramy Hassan—has already created and starred in his own breakout series on Hulu, and won both a Golden Globe and a Peabody award.

But it wasn't long ago that the country at large hadn't heard of him.

His stand-up comedy got him booked on the Late Show with Stephen Colbert back in 2017—in the lead-up to his three-episode stint on Mr. Robot as Elliot's obnoxious, rambling co-worker Samar. Prior to that performance he had never been on network television, and he jokes that even his mother didn't take his Hollywood ambition seriously—encouraging him to get into acting with the idea that he could infiltrate Hollywood and eventually "become a lawyer for actors."

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