Culture News

Is "Crazy Rich Asians" Star Henry Golding Fostering an "Attack Pit Bull"?

He's also being accused of being a "Heartless human being," but the truth is more complicated.

Chaos broke out in a Los Angeles park on Wednesday when Henry Golding and Liv Lo Golding's foster pit bull, Stella, attacked a smaller dog.

The victimized dog, a five-pound terrier mix named Lulu, ended up with a gash on his neck that required a trip to an emergency pet hospital. Five hours and six staples later, Lulu was allowed to go home in a cone of shame.

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MUSIC

The Top 20 Saddest Christmas Songs

Gather round the Christmas tree and get ready to cry!

Christmas is supposed to be a time of joy, but sometimes you're not feeling the cheer.

Or maybe you just love sad music and want to get in the holiday spirit. Whatever your reason for listening to melancholy music, there are plenty of devastating Christmas songs to help you cozy up with a cup of spiked cider and the blues. From indie gems to old classics, are our favorites.

1. McCarthy Trenching — Christmas Song

This song (which was later covered by Phoebe Bridgers) is simply devastating.

Christmas Song www.youtube.com


Phoebe Bridgers - Christmas Song (Official Audio) www.youtube.com

2. Julien Baker — Decorated Lawns

Truly, this is sad Christian queer folk in its highest form.

Julien Baker - Decorated Lawns (REMASTERED) www.youtube.com

3. Brent Butler — Brooklyn Christmas Eve

Punk Christmas never sounded so good.

Brooklyn Christmas Eve www.youtube.com

4. Sufjan Stevens — Sister Winter

Our Lonely Man of Winter has millions of options, but this apologetic and devastating song has to take the cake for Stevens' saddest holiday anthem.

Sufjan Stevens - Sister Winter www.youtube.com

5. Elvis Presley — Blue Christmas

Elvis's delivery is so blue, so dreary, so lugubrious, you feel like you're falling into a snowdrift of sadness just hearing him belt out the chorus.

Elvis Presley - Blue Christmas (Audio) www.youtube.com

6. Wham! — Last Christmas

"This year, to save me from tears, I'll give it to someone special" has to be one of the sickest burns ever to exist in a Christmas song.

Wham! - Last Christmas (Official Video) www.youtube.com

7. Taylor Swift — Christmases When You Were Mine

Taylor stabs you right in the heart with this saccharine song about missing an ex-lover.

Taylor Swift - Christmases When You Were Mine (Lyrics) www.youtube.com

8. Joni Mitchell — River

Joni Mitchell's mournful reinterpretation of "Jingle Bells" is seasonal depression distilled into sound, and it's four minutes and nine seconds of glittering, devastating brilliance.

Joni Mitchell - River (Official Audio) www.youtube.com

9. NewSong — The Christmas Shoes

It's "Christmas Shoes."

NewSong - The Christmas Shoes www.youtube.com

10. The Everly Brothers — Christmas Eve Can Kill You

Wait, it can?

EVERLY BROTHERS - Christmas Eve Can Kill You (1971) www.youtube.com

11. 7 O'Clock News/Silent Night — Simon and Garfunkel

This song is just "Silent Night" placed over a recording of the news, but as we all know, the news can be hard to listen to—and hearing it played against the soft sounds of Christmas makes the reports of violence and injustice even more difficult to tune out than usual.

7 O'clock News / Silent Night www.youtube.com

12. Prince — Another Lonely Christmas

Another lonely Christmas? How long has this been going on? Plus we all miss Prince.

Another Lonely Christmas www.youtube.com

13. Greensleeves

Though it has no words, it's almost universally agreed that this song just sounds sad. That's actually because the human brain is literally wired to hear the blues in minor chords, and this song has plenty of them.

Greensleeves - best version www.youtube.com

14. Elmo & Patsy — Grandma Got Run Over By a Reindeer

Is Grandma ok??? Are Elmo & Patsy ok? Are any of us ok considering we made this into a Christmas classic?

Elmo & Patsy - Grandma Got Run over by a Reindeer www.youtube.com

15. The Carpenters — Merry Christmas Darling

Everyone's favorite California dreamers got extra wistful on this dreary, exquisite number about heartbreak over the holidays.

Merry Christmas, Darling - The Carpenters www.youtube.com

16. Tom Waits — Christmas Card From A Hooker In Minneapolis

This song gets very real very quickly, but it does contain glimmers of hope.

Tom Waits- Christmas Card from a Hooker in Minneapolis (Studio Version) www.youtube.com

17. Marvin Gaye — I Want to Come Home For Christmas

Possibly the saddest song ever written, according to NPR.

I Want To Come Home For Christmas www.youtube.com

18. Darlene Love — Christmas (Baby Please Come Home)

What could be sadder than this plea to a lost love?

Darlene Love - Christmas (Baby please come home) www.youtube.com

19. Miley Cyrus — My Sad Christmas Song

The title alone is just so sad.

Miley Cyrus - My Sad Christmas Song www.youtube.com

20. LCD Soundsystem — Christmas Will Break Your Heart

So apparently if Christmas Eve doesn't kill me, then Christmas Day will break my heart, even though last Christmas, I gave you my heart but the very next day you gave it away. This year, to save me from tears, maybe I just won't celebrate Christmas... or maybe I'll start listening to happy music instead.

LCD Soundsystem - Christmas Will Break Your Heart video www.youtube.com

So there you have it — the twenty saddest Christmas songs we know of. However, despite these songs, we hope you have a very merry holiday.

Film Features

How Asian Men Became Hot in Hollywood

In order to be accepted and celebrated by mainstream audiences, Asian-American men run the double-edged risk of being perceived as "too Asian" and also feeling like an imposter of their own race.

Randall Park is hot like a burned-out high school shop teacher who's nice even when he's hungover.

Randall Park is camp counselor hot. Randall Park is take-home-to-parents hot. Or, as Buzzfeed News described, Park has "crinkly-eyed dad allure." Thanks to American media's "Asian wave" in the late 2010s (particularly the Korean Wave—or hallyu) across music, film, and television), some of today's most recognizable leading men now include the likes of Randall Park, Daniel Dae Kim, and Steven Yeun. But historically, Asian men have been erased, emasculated, or outright mocked in mainstream American media as the "least desirable" type of men.

The trajectory of Park's career, from his early struggles to his recent surge of success, is a reflection of the shifting attitudes towards Asian men. In an interview with Buzzfeed News, Park was described as having "an instantly recognizable face. That's both because his face is handsome in that classic movie actor way, but also because he's been in like, everything…" Best known as the well-meaning father in Fresh Off the Boat, Park was beloved in his role as the charming chump Marcus Kim, the HVAC technician and aspiring rapper who woos Ali Wong's character in Always Be My Maybe. The rom-com is a triumph in Asian-American representation precisely because it doesn't tokenize Asian ethnicity. Wong told Vulture, "What happens when you populate a movie with a lot of Asian-American people is that they get to be people. They don't have to be the Asian person in the movie."

But the recent rise of Asian men in media begs the questions of how and why they've been excluded from traditional "western" standards of Hollywood attractiveness in the first place. Before Crazy Rich Asians spotlighted Malaysian-British actor Henry Golding and showed America that "Asian men are hot," Asian characters were stereotypically "unattractive, asexual, always the sidekick." In fact, as of 2016, only 1% of Hollywood's leading roles went to Asian actors.

Park experienced firsthand the kind of typecasting and limiting stereotypes about Asian men propagated by the media. He's worked as a writer and actor in Hollywood since 2003. Early in his career, Vulture detailed, "Park was confronted with the moral dilemma actors of color have often faced: Do you refuse the compromising role, or do you take it and live to eat another day? He has his regrets. The first pilot he ever got was a Fox sitcom called Lucky Us in 2004, in which he played the evil neighbor, a gay Mr. Yunioshi caricature named Jimmy."

asian men hot hollywood Netflix

While it's not surprising for Hollywood to lack diverse representation, the American public seems to agree that Asian men are not as appealing as other races. Statistically, data collected from dating apps like OkCupid repeatedly show that Asian men have the lowest approval ratings from white, black, and Latina women. Ever since Asian-Americans were first heralded as the "model minority" in the 1960s, multiple studies have observed a strange paradox that Asian men were rated as being less desirable than other races despite being the most financially stable as a social group.

But therein lies much of the appeal of Randall Park's character in Always Be in My Maybe: He's just another schlub. He's not rich or successful, and his lifestyle is shaky as a full-time HVAC man and part-time aspiring rapper. BuzzFeed News points out that the film's success is partly due to "The Rise of the Rom-Com Schlub": "It's easy to see how these films could be interpreted as male wish fulfillment fantasies about characters who are inexplicably liked by women even as the men don't seem to have much to offer."

hot asian men in hollywood

Today, the Asian stereotypes of the stable and hard-working man, who's either intolerably nerdy or cold and emotionally unavailable, can't stand up in the face of the all-American schlub. Characters like Park's burned out Marcus Kim are "stealth smokeshows, and their characters are funny and disarming and entirely plausible as objects of affection." While "rom-coms have tended to abide by conflicted, sometimes regressive ideas about masculinity themselves," the under-achieving, well-meaning, and supportive burnout who's still trying to figure himself out is trying, "however imperfectly, to pry the genre away from that."

Writer Jason Shen at Vox agrees, adding that the film's introduction of an "Asian American underachiever is groundbreaking." He writes, "It might sound strange, but an Asian-American lead character playing a low achiever might just be what our community needs right now…Through its main characters, Always Be My Maybe expands what it means to be Asian American. Marcus may not have a great career, but that's never treated as a fundamental character flaw." Ultimately, he gets the girl in the end "because he overcame his fear of change and grew as a person. And that's something we can all relate to."

hot asian men Netflix

So how long can our newfound appreciation for Asian men last? In order to be accepted and celebrated by mainstream audiences, Asian-American men run the double-edged risk of being perceived as "too Asian" and also feeling like an imposter of their own race. Park, for all of his recent success, acknowledges feeling a sense of imposter syndrome. Born to Korean immigrants and raised in Los Angeles, he spoke with BuzzFeed about his poor Korean language skills and feeling like he's "not Asian enough." He commented, "Yeah, of course. Especially Korean impostor syndrome. I didn't have a lot of Korean friends growing up. I had like one Korean friend, who was my closest friend but we were both surrounded by other races. I love the food, I make kimchi because it really connects me, but I'm always trying to find ways to connect to my Koreanness more."

There seems to be staying power to our current "Asian wave." Twitter is clearly supportive of ogling Asian men. And Ali Wong has been gushing about the attractiveness of Asian men since her first hit comedy special Baby Cobra in 2015: "No body odor. None. They just smell like responsibility. Asian men are the sexiest. They have no body hair from the neck down. It's like making love to a dolphin."

hot asian men Netflix