MUSIC

Hot Girl Quarantine: "Savage" Will Be the Song We Associate with Coronavirus Forever

As its dance goes viral and we're stuck in our homes, "Savage" will remind us of this dark time years from now.

Earlier this month, Megan Thee Stallion released her most vulnerable project yet, Suga.

The Houston rapper quickly rose to massive Internet virality last year with her declaration of "Hot Girl Summer," a manifesto she's illustrated in countless tweets, candid videos, and of course a synonymous song (which became a Top 10 hit). Her popularity has set the hip-hop world ablaze, and she isn't burning out anytime soon.

"Savage," a characteristically cutthroat banger from Suga, is just the latest cut from Megan's growing discography to flourish on social media. On March 10, TikToker Keara Wilson first posted a clip of the dance she choreographed to "Savage." Since the original, Wilson has uploaded multiple TikToks of the dance, accruing hundreds of thousands of likes. She also posted a nifty tutorial for maximum trend potential.

Keara wilson on TikTok

Keara wilson on TikTok www.tiktok.com

NEW DANCE ALERT! 🚨 if u use my dance tag me so i can see🤗 @theestallion #writethelyrics #PlayWithLife #foyou #fyp #foryoupage #newdance #savage

As with all the best viral dances, Wilson's routine spread like wildfire, spawning recreations from TikTok royalty like Addison Rae and Charli D'Amelio, as well as from other Gen-Z favorites like Emma Chamberlain, James Charles, and Liza Koshy.

addison rae on TikTok

addison rae on TikTok www.tiktok.com


@sherinicolee OK MAMA

charli d'amelio on TikTok

charli d'amelio on TikTok www.tiktok.com

@keke.janajah

Soon enough, of course, the dance caught the attention of Thee Stallion herself, who shared her rendition of it from the comfort of home in a onesie. The caption reads "#quarantineandchill." As we're all cooped up in our houses, (hopefully) working remotely and (hopefully) practicing social distancing, the "Savage" dance has henceforth dubbed the foreseeable future as Hot Girl Quarantine. Years from now, when we're all finally allowed back into the bars and parties have resumed, "Savage" will begin playing in the distance. We'll look at our friends longingly and say, "Remember when we survived a pandemic?"

We all have songs that we associate with a certain event or period in time. Ex-Tumblr kids will remember the black-and-white clad aesthetic circa 2013 that became inextricable from songs like the 1975's "Chocolate" and the Neighbourhood's "Sweater Weather." Green Day's "Time of Your Life" is to high school graduations what Medicare for All is to Bernie Sanders' platform.

Now, the Very Online generation will forever associate "Savage" with the coronavirus. With so much free time on our hands, Internet scrolling is the new 9-to-5. With gyms on lockdown, dancing in our bedrooms seems like the most natural way to get endorphins. I, a grown adult, begrudgingly made my own painfully unsexy TikTok to "Savage," and would recommend you do the same to distract yourself from...everything else.

Though we won't be hearing it in clubs or at get-togethers with friends, "Savage" is still bound to become even more popular and inescapable as our time indoors trickles on. It's sassy, it's moody, it's nasty—in a weird way, it's just like a global pandemic.

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Music Reviews

Megan Thee Stallion's "Suga" Shows the Hot Girl's Soft Side

On her new project, the Houston rapper is more vulnerable than ever.

Just weeks before releasing her debut, Fever, Megan Thee Stallion lost her mother, Holly Thomas, to brain cancer.

"I lost my mommy and my granny in the same month," go the opening lines of the 25-year-old rapper's new project, Suga, released almost exactly a year after those devastating events. But Suga arrives not in spite of the tragedy but because of the renewed strength Megan found in the process. Her tenacity proves itself in the recent lawsuit that shadows Suga, too; last weekend, Megan claimed that her label, 1501 Certified Entertainment, was blocking her from releasing new music. She sued the label for $1 million and was granted a temporary restraining order so that she could release new music. In short, putting in a good fight and coming out on top has kind of become Megan's thing.

The quick-rising rapper has mentioned in the past that she has a hard time being vulnerable. Ever since going viral with cheeky, booty-shaking bops like "Big Ole Freak," Megan has found her superpower in cleverly lewd freestyles, spotlighting female desire and signing off with an air kiss. The Houston Hottie isn't any less brazen on Suga, but she supplements that powerful attitude with her soft side. On early single "B.I.T.C.H.," she checks herself in light of a partner's infidelity: "I ain't perfect, and I try to fix the s--t that ain't working / But it's 2020, I ain't finna argue 'bout twerking," she asserts, making the necessary argument that women can flaunt their bodies while still remaining loyal in committed relationships. Part of her "hot girl" philosophy is, after all, maintaining yourself on the inside; Megan is open to growth, but not at the cost of dulling her boldness.

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And Megan, as Suga shows us, has grown a lot. On the gym playlist-ready "Savage," she spits about avoiding Instagram clothing brands, growing tired of fighting with other girls, and keeping her suitors' identities confidential (although she reminds us with a wink that every man she's slept with is "still attached" to her). "Crying In the Car" gives a hint at what kind of pain Megan has been enduring behind the scenes: "Please don't give up on me, Lord, Lord / Promise to keep goin' hard, hard / All of them nights that I cried in the car / All them tears turned into ice on my arms," she croons over the chorus, leading into closer "What I Need," which takes a big-picture scope at a real-deal love.

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Megan will always delight in raunchy raps and promiscuity, but it's refreshing to see her embrace more emotional topics. While Suga might not soundtrack the next iteration of Hot Girl Summer, it paints a deeper, more realistic picture. Loss, pain, and heartache don't spare anybody; as Megan Thee Stallion assures us on Suga, it's a natural component of "real hot girl s--t."