FILM

Nobody Asked for Eminem's Surprise Oscars Performance

The rapper performed his hit "Lose Yourself," which won the Oscar for Best Original Song in 2003.

Considering what many considered to be an overwhelmingly white and male nominee pool, the 92nd Annual Academy Awards ended up being...not that bad?

Korean thriller Parasite made history by becoming the first foreign language film to take home an Oscar for Best Picture, and its director Bong Joon Ho was adorable on numerous occasions. Joaquin Phoenix, after being named Best Lead Actor, continued his streak of spicy acceptance speeches with a condemnation of the animal agriculture industry. Janelle Monáe's opening number saluted snubbed films like Us and Midsommar. Kristen Wiig and Maya Rudolph were, well, just as funny as you'd expect.

But there was one appearance at the Oscars that had many attendees and viewers perplexed. At the end of a montage celebrating iconic songs made famous by movies, clips of 8 Mile were projected on the screen as the instantly recognizable chug of "Lose Yourself" played along. And then—for reasons widely unbeknownst to the audience—Eminem himself appeared onstage to perform the 2002 No. 1 hit.

While some audience members in the Dolby Theatre happily rapped along, many seemed dumbfounded by Eminem's seemingly random appearance.

"Lose Yourself" became the first rap number to win the Oscar for Best Original Song back in 2003, but Eminem didn't attend that year because he didn't think he had a chance of winning. Although the reason for his delayed appearance is unclear, it seems Eminem just figured he was better late than never: "Look, if you had another shot, another opportunity... Thanks for having me @TheAcademy," he tweeted. "Sorry it took me 18 years to get here."

We're glad Slim Shady finally got his second shot, but why 18 years late? At this point, it feels like a pathetic and haphazard promotion of his eleventh studio album, Music to Be Murdered By, which received backlash for its audacious reference to the bombing at Ariana Grande's 2017 Manchester concert. A clip of old audio also recently resurfaced in which Eminem claimed he'd "side with Chris Brown" on the issue of Brown's infamous assault of Rihanna. Why are we continuing to bait Eminem's constant hunger for relevancy?

These audience reactions say it best:


TV Reviews

HBO's "I'll Be Gone In the Dark" Is a Complex Portrait of Serial Killer-Hunter Michelle McNamara

The improbably fascinating "I'll Be Gone In the Dark" subverts traditional serial killer narratives.

Michelle McNamara

In the years leading up to her death, Michelle McNamara haunted message boards, libraries, and Sacramento families to get to the bottom of the case that obsessed and consumed her.

McNamara, a true crime blogger whose interest in serial killers morphed into a compulsive desire to hunt and catch them, is the subject of a new HBO documentary series. The first episode, which premiered last Sunday, presents a small window into the mind of a woman who hunted serial killers until she accidentally overdosed on sleeping pills.

It's completely enthralling, a marked subversion of typical serial killer narratives as well as a commentary on their devastating and peculiar appeal.

I'll Be Gone In the Dark (2020): Official Trailer | HBO www.youtube.com


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The Frozen 2 soundtrack features beloved acts such as Kacey Musgraves and Panic! at the Disco, but Weezer's version of "Lost in the Woods" is an unholy force of 80s power ballads and 90s nostalgia.

An icon of 90s alt rock, Weezer is emblematic of nerd rock for many millennials, but to the upcoming Generation Alpha (those born from 2010-2024) they may become Disney stars. In Weezer's music video, frontman River Cuomo re-enacts, scene for scene, Kristoff (Jonathan Graff)'s performance of the 80s-inspired power ballad (including Kristen Bell dressed in full Anna gear!). Frozen's Academy Award-winning songwriters, Robert Lopez and his wife, Kristen Anderson-Lopez, say they took inspiration from Bryan Adams and their youth so they could tackle the big emotional questions addressed in the song (questioning whether or not an established relationship is still right for you) while also having fun.

Above all, seeing Cuomo, 49, and bandmates (ages 48 to 54 years old) standing in a knock-off Enchanted Forest in an homage to the most popular children's movie in the world is hilariously cringey. I want to watch this video first thing in the morning when I'm questioning why anyone bothers to get dressed and leave the house, while I'm on the train surrounded by screaming children and two businessmen aggressively bantering over my head, and after work while I'm too tired to believe there will be a future, and so maybe I won't have to do it all again tomorrow. Maybe it's the earnest yearning of the song matched by Cuomo's lost eyes. Maybe it's the purple backlighting on the sound stage. Maybe it's Frozen 2's not so hidden messaging about climate change and the fact that climate crisis is imminent.

We're all lost in the woods, motherf*ckers–and we're all creepy people wearing adult costumes, stalking around the wilderness, looking for connection that isn't there.

Weezer - Lost in the Woods (From "Frozen 2") youtu.be