James Bond and Pussy Galore, "Goldfinger" (1965)

When I decided to re-watch all of the James Bond movies in chronological order, I wasn't exactly expecting a politically correct, feminist franchise that would pass the Bechdel test with flying colors.

My memory of the early movies consisted of a lot of smarmy one-liners, plenty of women in those kind of pointy bikini tops, bad guys with Russian or German accents, and loads of shots of Sean Connery's legs. As far as Bond's relationship with women, I remembered that he was unquestionably a womanizer and women often just melted into his arms, apparently seduced by the mere sight of him. I was prepared to laugh at these outdated tropes and accept the movies' questionable gender dynamics as a product of a different time. I wasn't expecting to see point blank sexual assault.

WARNING: Discussion of rape and sexual assault.

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Journiest

8 of the Most Overrated Instagram Destinations (And Where to Go Instead)

If you don't want the unfiltered reality to leave you disappointed, you might want to skip some of these spots.

You've probably been told at some point in your life that things are not always as they appear.

And it's generally a good idea to keep in mind how easily we can be fooled by appearances. But that lesson is never more needed than when we're scrolling through instagram.

Whether it's normal people playing with angles, makeup, photoshop, and filters to project some idealized version of themselves, or celebrities getting caught making themselves thinner, Instagram is a minefield of deceptive appearances that can mess with your head. And travelgram is no exception.

Apart from attractive faces and bodies, beautiful travel destinations are among the most popular content on the app, and among the most deceptive. The more awe-inspiring a landscape appears on social media, the more likely it is to look washed out, crowded, and smaller than you expected when you finally get there.

Whether through deceptive photo editing, or just framing images to crop out the 2,000 other people packed together to take the same picture, Instagram has a way of selling you on a version of travel that doesn't really exist. Fortunately, for every destination that's been overhyped by influencers, there's another that is either overlooked, or actually lives up to its legend.

Overrated: Antelope Canyon

Both the upper and lower section of Antelope Canyon in Arizona offer beautiful, curving contours of sandstone carved out by the rush of flood waters through narrow passages. Glowing shafts of sunlight drop from overhead, lighting up the rich colors and the intricate shapes of sandstone laid out in layers. Up above, the rich golds and reds frame sections of clear blue sky.

They're also both incredibly crowded, costly to visit, only catch those iconic shafts of sunlight around noon — when tours are generally sold out — and they rain a fine sand that will absolutely get in your eyes when you look up. They're truly beautiful slot canyons, but they're also overrated. But where should you go instead?

Overrated: Pink Sand Beaches

What could make a Caribbean beach vacation even more magical? How about a beach that's bubblegum pink?! A handful of beaches in the Bahamas, Bermuda, and Indonesia are known for their pink sand, tinged by tiny pieces of red coral and seashells.

The make for some striking photos...with a bit of tweaking. In person, however, the sand at these beaches is a light tan color, with maybe faint hint of pink at the waters edge, if you really look for it. Only when you crank up the saturation does it take on that vibrant fairytale, pepto bismol hue.

This doesn't mean you can't have a great time at the beach. That pink sand is nearly as soft and pleasant as some of the white sand beaches where it feels like you're walking in baby powder.

That, combined with the sunny weather and the warm blue waters might have you forgetting that you were expecting a fantasy land. But where should you go if you want a beach that looks as striking and different in person as it does in pictures?

Overrated: Machu Picchu

High in the Andes Mountains, 50 miles outside the small city of Cusco, Peru, you might not expect centuries-old Inca ruins to be crawling with tourists. You would be wrong.

The natural beauty of the landscape and the impressive remnants of a once-sprawling empire have combined to make Machu Picchu an incredibly popular destination for travellers who love having their picture taken and harassing Llamas. It's a truly breathtaking place, but what must have once felt like a spot frozen in time, shielded from modern civilization, has become something closer to a theme park.

So where should you go instead?

Overrated: Stonehenge

Stonehenge in Wiltshire, England is a marvel of the ancient world.

Enormous stones weighing upwards of 25 tons were transported from far away and arranged in a circle that aligns with various astronomical bodies. There remain many mysteries about both how ancient peoples managed to build it, and what role it played in their lives -- both practically and spiritually. What's not a mystery is the fact that so many people visit Stonehenge each year to experience its wonder...and most of them are at least a little bit disappointed.

For starters, the "so many people" who go to Stonehenge add up to about a million visitors each year. That's an average of close to 3,000 people each day, with a lot more than that in warmer months. And the site itself is not that big, so you will absolutely notice all those other people. The whole circle of stones is only a little wider than a basketball court is long.

Oh, and worst of all, with the exception of special occasions -- when Stonehenge is much, much busier -- the cost of admission does not include getting anywhere near the stones... But where should you go instead?

Overrated: Plitvice Lakes National Park

Croatia's Plitvice Lakes National Park has become a staple of Instatravel influencers. With walkways, boat tours and train rides leading around its tiered lakes of crystal-clear water fed by waterfalls overflowing with lush plant life, it makes for truly incredible pictures.

It's also the most popular park in Croatia, with around 1.8 million visitors every year. Those numbers can lead to long waits and heavy crowds, and the price of admission reflects that, more than tripling in the warmer months. But the real downfall of visiting Plitvice Lakes is that you're not even allowed to swim.

So while the pictures are amazing year round, you might want to skip Plitvice Lakes during summer months with heavy crowds, steep admission, and the forbidden temptation of a soothing dip in the cool waters. But where should you go instead?

Overrated: Banff National Park

Moraine Lake and Lake Louise in Alberta, Canada's Banff National Park are known for the incredible blue colors of their glacial-fed waters. But the if you've only seen those colors in pictures, you might be surprised to find out...that they're just as incredible in person.

This is not a case of deceptive photo editing. Banff really is as beautiful as it looks on Instagram. But it's also overhyped. Camp sites and hotel rooms within the park are often booked months in advance, and even the large parking lots near Lake Louise tend to fill up early in the morning. As for Lake Moraine, you'll likely have to park miles away and wait around for a shuttle.

It really is a beautiful area, but everyone knows it, so you end up sharing the area with way too many other people. So where should you go instead?

Overrated: Zhangye's Rainbow Mountains

There are a number of spots famed for their beautifully multi-colored stone and earth — Peru's Vinicunca, Mauritius' Seven Colored Earth, and Zhangye, China's incredible Rainbow Mountains. What all these places have in common, apart from being truly incredible geological natural wonders, is that none of them look nearly as dramatic in person as they do in the images that tend to get passed around online.

While it's true that the mountains' colors show more clearly after a rainstorm, even if you're lucky enough to visit at the right time, they will never look anything like they do in highly edited images that end up defining people's expectations. But if you do want to see some incredibly vibrant, colorful mountains, where should you go instead?

Overrated: Sunset at Yosemite's Glacier Point

Having a great spot to view the sunset over Yosemity Valley is not an experience you're likely to forget or regret. If that means you end up at Glacier point, you won't be disappointed, but you may find yourself distracted by the presence of hundreds of other people wth the same goal in mind.

Like a number of other lookouts in Yosemite National Park, the incredible scale and majesty of the view is somewhat compromised by its popularity. So where should you go instead?

Overrated: Christ the Redeemer

If you're ever in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil, you absolutely have to see Christ the Redeemer, the 125 foot statue of Jesus holding his arms in the shape of a cross. It's undoubtedly the city's most iconic site, and you would be crazy to miss it. The good news is, it's also basically impossible to miss.

The statue was placed on peak overlooking the Rio De Janeiro, so it could be seen more or less throughout the city. As such, you can get a good view of it without going up close. And you absolutely do not need to see it up close -- despite what insane throngs of people posing around it during daylight hours seem to think.

But if you want to have a vantage point overlooking Rio De Janeiro, where should you go instead?

FILM

Will the Coronavirus Finally Settle the Streaming Movies vs. Theater Debate?

With COVID-19 now a full-blown pandemic, industries are struggling to adjust, but the film and TV industry may never be the same

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Less than a year ago, at the 2019 Cinemacon in Las Vegas, Oscar Winner Helen Mirren shared her opinion on streaming movies in no uncertain terms: "I love Netflix, but f*ck Netflix!"

The comment came amid controversy over the criteria by which a film qualifies for consideration for the Academy Awards and other major accolades. At the time, Netflix and other streaming platforms were pushing for their original productions to be included for consideration without the need for traditional theatrical releases, and many in the industry balked at the prospect. Yesterday, Regal and AMC—the largest cinema chains in the US—both announced that they will be closing all their theatres starting today. Together, the two companies operate nearly 50% of theater screens in the US. Other chains have restricted theater crowds, and more closures are certain to follow.

With no clear end in sight for the coronavirus pandemic, there is an open question about how the movie and television industries will cope. While social distancing is creating increased demand for streaming content, and numerous scheduled releases and production schedules have been delayed indefinitely, will studios be forced to release their existing projects online? Will selection criteria be adjusted for the 2021 award season? And will movie theaters ever recover?

Almost every aspect of our society is in the process of restructuring to adjust to the reality of the COVID-19 pandemic. More and more people are working from home. Entire regions are shutting down their restaurants and bars. And citizens and politicians alike are calling for measures that would have been unthinkable a few weeks ago—on the left, many people are pushing for freezes on evictions, as well as rent and mortgage payments, and even some Republicans (normally shills for heartless capitalism) are suggesting universal income measures to help people get by. In the short term it's causing unprecedented turmoil in the stock market, but in the long term, some industries are likely to never fully bounce back.

In some of the most dire cases—movie theaters being a prime example—the change has been a long time coming. American theater attendance peaked in 2002 and has been on a slow decline ever since—with audiences increasingly preferring the convenience of television and streaming services. Independent theaters have been hit hardest, with many closing down in recent years. Likewise, brick and mortar retail has been hit hard by the convenience of online shopping—with many local stores and even some major retail chains forced out of business. The restrictions imposed by the coronavirus—the latest guidelines advise against gatherings of more than ten people—are only accelerating the rate of change that was already occurring.

While many industry insiders would decry the loss of the theater experience—the immersive scale and the communal environment—most Americans have gotten used to viewing even epic films on screens smaller than a sheet of paper. While directors like Steven Spielberg and Christopher Nolan will argue that movies are made to be viewed on the big screen, when your nose is six inches from the action, it hardly feels small. None of this is to say that there won't be something real lost if movie theaters disappear—just that it might be inevitable, and that the coronavirus pandemic has sped up the process. Empty movie theaters may soon join the suburban blight of empty malls and abandoned factories that dot the American landscape. They may go the way of the drive-in.

Abandoned Mall

With the narrow profit margins involved in the theater business, government intervention (as we've already seen with other industries) could help them stay afloat until things return to normal, but the more realistic scenario may be that things never return to normal. While AMC's closure is currently slated to last 6-12 weeks, there is no way of telling how long it will actually last, and it may end up consuming the rest of 2020 and beyond. Will the Hollywood Foreign Press and the Academy open consideration to streaming content and encourage studios to opt for Internet releases in the case of James Bond, Mulan, and others? Or will they cancel next year's award season entirely? Whatever the case, 2020 is looking increasingly likely to be the year that cements the supremacy of the Internet over going outside.

Meanwhile, with Stephen Colbert delivering his Late Show monologue from home (from his bathtub, to be specific), will we see other productions following suit—delivering much-needed entertainment to the isolated masses while limiting the spread of the virus? The term "bottle episode" refers to the trope—particularly common in 90s sitcoms—wherein a small number of characters are trapped together in a confined space. Will we see a resurgence of that concept with an influx of quarantine content? Or will television networks and studios take it to the next level and invest in concepts that allow performers to work remotely from the safety of home, either with animation, or with live-action shows that play with the fact that no one is in the same room (e.g. the episode of Modern Family that took place entirely on FaceTime) If not, TV may also be left behind by the vast array of independent content creators who are more than capable of working with the current conditions.

modern family

Whatever else happens in the coming months—and as much as this all feels like a throwback to a different era—we should all be thankful, for once, that culture has increasingly embraced isolation with streaming and delivery services that prevent the need to leave our homes. We all thought we were just being lazy. It turns out we were training for a pandemic.

It's easy to forget that most social media accounts we interact with have actual faces behind the screen names.

(Of course, bots exist, but they're still relatively rare...or so we think).

The Internet is a reflection of the real world, and a great deal of human interaction in reality is defined by power imbalances, cruelty, and bullying. Naturally, the Internet has its fair share of bullying as well. But social media—particularly Instagram and Twitter—allows anonymous trolls to crystallize half-ironic messages of loathing into short bursts of vitriol, which often catch on like wildfire and inspire copycats. The hive mind generated by social media and its toxic fanbases and trolling collectives have made vicious bullying an all-too-common occurrence online. As humans, we're psychologically wired to fixate on the few negative comments we receive rather than appreciating positive feedback and success, so a few negative comments can start a downward spiral—and a flurry of them can push people over the edge.

Celebrities are certainly not exempt from this. Fame has always been a double-edged sword, exposing stars to envy and hyper-scrutiny, a dangerous combination that often generates cruel bullying among people who are too scared to stand up for themselves in their real lives. Haunted by their own inadequacy, hateful and drunk on their ability to tweet-storm their way into a brief moment of virality that distracts them from the pain of their real lives, trolls have disrupted countless celebrity lives. Yet some celebrities have turned their experience with racism, lies, and bullying online into positive messages, attempting to use social media to spread kindness, connection, and love.

Ultimately, social media is what we make of it. The Internet is a reflection of the human psyche—often the darker impulses that lurk in the human psyche—but it can also be a way of manifesting our capacity to connect and love each other over impossible boundaries. Here are the stories of seven celebrities whose experiences with bullying nearly led them to death and inspired them to change their own and others' lives.

1. Billie Eilish

allure.com

"It was ruining my life, once again," said Billie Eilish. She was talking about the hate she's received on Instagram in a recent BBC interview, promoting her Bond song "No Time to Die." "It's worse, it's way worse than it's ever been right now."

"I think you might see someone like a famous celebrity and you may think, 'Sticks and stones, nothing I say is going to be potent to them… but it's all very equal online," said her brother and producer Finneas.

Since she won five Grammys, 18-year-old Billie Eilish's profile has risen, and subsequently more trolls and bullies have emerged from under their bridges. "I stopped [social media] like two days ago. I've stopped reading comments fully... It's weird," the singer said. "The cooler the things you get to do, the more people hate you. Cancel culture is insane. The Internet is a bunch of trolls, and the problem is a lot of it is really funny. It's anything for a joke. People say anything to make people laugh. It's insane that I have ever been reading comments. I should've stopped long ago but the problem is I've always wanted to stay in touch with my fans, and people have ruined that for me and for them. That sucks. I still try to like fan posts. If I see fans anywhere I just want to talk to them. They're people, they're me. They're like friends of mine, but the Internet is ruining my life, so I turned it off."

While sometimes motivated by positive ideals, cancel culture is widely considered unproductive, even for the social justice causes it presumes to defend. A "canceled" person rarely actually loses their career or winds up on the street; if anything, cancelation is another form of easy trolling, a way of gaining illusory forms of control over issues that one has no ability to influence.

Even if Eilish is the latest victim of cancel culture, she probably won't be going anywhere anytime soon—but still, her decision to avoid social media comments is probably a wise one.

2. Zayn Malik

Telegraph

In 2012, Zayn spoke out about the bullying and racism he'd experienced online. "Nasty things [were said] like I'm a terrorist, and this and that," he told The Sun in 2012. "How can you justify that? How can you call me that and get away with it?" The former One Direction star was attacked for his Muslim faith, among other attributes, which likely didn't help his struggles with anxiety.

In the interview, Zayn clarified he was able to shake off the comments until his mom started seeing them. "You can say whatever you want about me, I'm not really bothered," he said. "But when it starts to upset people I care about or I hear about it from my mum, then that's a problem."

Zayn would prefer if people would confront him on the streets. "If that was said to me in the street or someone said it to my face or whatever then something could be done about it."

Though Zayn might've been acting tough, according to The Independent, cyberbullying can have genuine consequences. "Until a person experiences this kind of bullying, or someone close to them does, it can be difficult to fully understand how devastating it can be," said a spokesperson for the Cybersmile Foundation. "Quick judgments and harsh comments may seem like nothing to people sat behind their computers or on their mobiles, but online bullying follows people around the clock and can feel impossible to escape from, or imagine ending."

3. Jesy Nelson

Capital FM Jingle Bell Ball, London, UK - 09 Dec 2018 celebsnow.co.uk

In 2019, Lil Mix star Jesy Nelson opened up about how social media abuse nearly drove her to suicide. Nelson became "obsessed" with seeking out negative comments about herself and her appearance—and there were many—leading her down a spiral of depression and self-harm.

"It was like I wanted to hurt myself," she said. "The only way I can describe the pain is like constantly being heartbroken."

Things only began to improve when she finally deleted her social media accounts. "It wasn't until I deleted Twitter that everything changed for me and I slowly started to feel normal again," she said. "Don't get me wrong, I still have days when I feel sh*t in myself but instead of beating myself up about it and being miserable, I think: 'OK, I'm going to have my moment of being sad, and I'll be over it.' Before, I didn't let myself be sad."

Her perspective has changed over the years. "Back then I just thought everyone hated me," she said in a BBC documentary. "But no, actually, they're doing it because they feel bad about themselves. So now when I look at trolls being nasty, I feel a bit sorry for them. The only way I can understand it is that being nasty makes them feel better in themselves. I didn't have the mindset to think like that back then – I wish I did."

These comments touch on a truth about trolls and online bullies: Being vicious and mean online—especially when you're targeting someone's appearance or personality or attacking them for no reason—is an easy way to feel powerful without actually doing anything.

4. Millie Bobby Brown

teenvogue.com

As she rose to prominence as a young actress on Stranger Things, Millie Bobby Brown found herself slammed with cruel insults online.

It wasn't the first time she'd experienced bullying, though. "I was bullied at school back in England," she said during an interview with Glamour UK. "So it's extremely important for me to speak out against bullying." The bullying ultimately forced her to switch schools.

Flash forward to 2019. Having been named one of Time Magazine's 100 most influential people and the youngest ever UNICEF ambassador, Brown was forced to leave Twitter after experiencing a barrage of trolling. Fans created dozens of fake threads and fake memes that accused Brown of being homophobic to her fans, among other insults.

"Like millions of other girls around the world, I've also been bullied and harassed online," Brown said in a speech for UNICEF. "It's a terrifying feeling to look at your phone and see that messages people are sending you are filled with anger, hate and even threats. So many of these are strangers and anonymous trolls on the internet. Like all bullies, they gain their power by taking power away from others, by making them feel as scared and helpless as I did."

"I was lucky," she continued. "With the help of my friends, family and people around me, I was able to overcome these negative things and take my power back. But millions of children aren't so lucky. They're still struggling in the darkness. Bullying and online threats are never harmless, never just words. It puts children's mental health at risk. It causes stress and, in the most extreme cases, it can lead to self-harm, sickness and even suicide."

Her own experiences with bullying have inspired her to reach out to anyone who might be experiencing something similar. "Somewhere in the world today — right now — a teenage girl is being bullied online," she said. "She's scared. She's vulnerable. She feels alone," Millie said. "My message to her is this: You are not alone. There are people who care about you. There are people who will listen if you reach out for help. You have rights."

She concluded on a positive note. "I'm convinced that social media doesn't have to be a place of fear, bullying and harassment," she said. "It can bring people together. It can be a place of love and support."

5. Leslie Jones

LA Times

Leslie Jones advises anyone who is experiencing bullying online to simply "Block the evil."

After she starred in a reboot of Ghostbusters, Jones experienced hate and racism on Twitter. At first, she attempted to respond directly to the attacks, screen-shotting and posting them and inspiring fans to start a counter-campaign, #LoveforLeslieJ. Still, it didn't change the fact that she was receiving direct attacks.

"When this stuff started happening...what was upsetting was that it was a bunch of people with evil as their goal," she said. "It wasn't like they were joining together to say some nice things to me. They were joining together in evil. To do something. That's what upsets me. I was like, 'Oh my God, they're believing in what they're sending to me.'

"But let me tell you something about me," she continued. "I don't let it live there. I know who I am and I know who they are."

She advised any recipients of bullying to step away from the screen, and to try to gain some perspective. "If you're getting bullied right now, please take a second to step back and go, 'This is not real ... this is not a reality,' because if those people saw you on the street they would not say none of that. Why are you scared of someone that's hiding behind a keyboard?" she asked, emphasizing that feeding the trolls isn't the answer.

"That's what they want. They want that attention," she said. "Blocking is my best friend. That's how I answer questions now. Block! Block them, and block them out of your brain. And please, please, you have to talk to yourself and you have to have a conversation with yourself and say, 'Hey, this is not real, this is evil.' Don't let it in your life."

6. Ariel Winter

buzzfeed.com

The Modern Family starlet experienced extensive body-shaming and bullying online, particularly during her early years of fame. "It was also hard at first, when I wasn't really speaking out about things I believed in, when I was kind of just starting in the public eye, and I was really young, probably 11 or 12 that I started gaining recognition in that way, and having people start commenting on everything about me. I was a developed younger person ... They would see me, and even though I was a child, they'd talk about me and my body like I was an adult—or, you know, shame me for this or shame me for that—and it was really difficult," she told GMA.

"I spent a lot of years trying to figure out who I wanted to be, what I wanted to look like—if I did this would people stop...if I did this would people stop," she explained. "Over the years I kind of just learned there's nothing, with not even just body image, that you will be able to do to please everybody."

At one point, she began posting confessional and motivational posts online in response to all the bullying, trying to counter all the negativity with some inspiration. "The only person that you need to take into account is yourself because at the end of the day, it's just us," she wrote in one Instagram post. "At the end of the day, the opinion that matters most, that should be the most valuable one, is your own."

She also began posting transparent confessions about mental health, a cause that's extremely personal to her. "I've suffered from depression and anxiety in life, and I know so many people that also suffer from that, or suffer from similar things, but never talk about it," she explained in one Instagram notes-app confession.

Sometimes, though, speaking out isn't the answer, and the best strategy turned out to be cutting off the Internet entirely and spending time in the real world. In 2018, Winter quit Twitter because of the bullying she had continued to receive. "Ariel has taken a break from Twitter and engaging with commenters on her other platforms because of the constant negativity she experiences. She needs a moment to breathe and enjoy herself without judgement," a statement on her account read.

Since then, she's focused on prioritizing positive aspects of social media instead of focusing solely on negative comments. "As a society we do comment more on the negative and that comment really hit me and so now I'm really trying to follow that of like, doing what I actually feel, which is to be thankful for the support and actually show that and kind of try and bury the negative," she said.

Winter seems to be focusing on reshaping her mind so that she pays more attention to the positive aspects of her online and real worlds instead of the trolls trying to bring her down, which is an admirable quest, but it's hard to do when you're constantly receiving negative and distracting comments.

7. Kelly Marie Tran

Kelly Marie Tran Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

In an op-ed for the New York Times, Star Wars star Kelly Marie Tran wrote about her experience with online bullying—and how it reflects pre-existing structural forces in the real world.

"It wasn't their words, it's that I started to believe them," she wrote. "Their words seemed to confirm what growing up as a woman and a person of color already taught me: that I belonged in margins and spaces, valid only as a minor character in their lives and stories."

Tran, the first woman of color to hold a leading role in a Star Wars film, had steadfastly run a positive and encouraging Instagram account for years. It was filled with messages like, "I'm an incomplete, imperfect, broken mess, and I'm here to say that it's OKAY to be imperfect."

But apparently Tran experienced "months of harassment" thanks to Star Wars fans, who flooded her posts and online forums with racist slurs. She ultimately deleted her Instagram, and later published the Times op-ed.

"I had been brainwashed into believing that my existence was limited to the boundaries of another person's approval," she wrote. "I had been tricked into thinking that my body was not my own, that I was beautiful only if someone else believed it, regardless of my own opinion. I had been told and retold this by everyone: by the media, by Hollywood, by companies that profited from my insecurities, manipulating me so that I would buy their clothes, their makeup, their shoes, in order to fill a void that was perpetuated by them in the first place."

"I want to live in a world where children of color don't spend their entire adolescence wishing to be white. I want to live in a world where women are not subjected to scrutiny for their appearance, or their actions, or their general existence," she concluded. "I want to live in a world where people of all races, religions, socioeconomic classes, sexual orientations, gender identities and abilities are seen as what they have always been: human beings."

CULTURE

How to Get Billie Eilish's Baggy-Chic Look

From comfy sneakers to bulky chains, here's how to emulate the "bad guy" singer's best looks.

Aside from her buttery vocals and her record-setting Grammys sweep, Billie Eilish also stands out for her iconic, androgynous sense of style.

The 18-year-old pop star is immediately recognizable for her oversized, streetwear-inspired looks. Whether she's on stage riling up a crowd or walking the red carpet, Eilish likes her clothes loose and in bold colors and patterns. Her idol Tyler, the Creator likened her wardrobe to that of a quarterback, but, in reality, her roomy outfit choices are meant to distract critics from making inappropriate and sexist comments about her body: comfy and empowering.

Sadly, Eilish's budget can be a little out of range for most of us, but that doesn't mean average Joes can't participate in her baggy-chic attire. Here's just a few ways to emulate the "bad guy"'s best looks.

Start with the Sneakers

If there ever were a sneakerhead in pop music, it's Eilish, who sports comfy kicks no matter the occasion. But you don't have to shell out upwards of $1,000 for a pair of Balenciaga tennis shoes; the Adidas Falcons give off the same effect for a fraction of the price. You can get them in a versatile solid white like Eilish has here or in a bold color to make an extra statement.

Adidas Falcon Sneakers, $100

Simple Logos

There's something perfectly kitschy about the Playboy logo, whether it's in a singular giant graphic like Eilish sports here or in a repeated print. We think she'd approve of this sweatshirt from Playboy's collaboration with Missguided—just be sure to size up if you really want to get her look.

Playboy x Missguided Pink Repeat Print Oversized Hoodie Dress, $59

Snow-Ready Shades

More often than not, Eilish's eyewear looks better fit for the slopes than for the streets. But chunky goggles are an essential component to emulating her look whether or not you're in the snow. Opt for some with mirrored lenses that'll keep you looking sporty chic.

Roka CP-1X Performance Sunglasses, $215

Chunky Chains

You'd be hard pressed to find interview audio of Eilish where her statement jewelry isn't jingling in the background. When it comes to dangling bracelets and oversized rings, the more the merrier, but a simple layered chain necklace like this one is a good place to start.

Dolls Kill Subtle Intentions Lock Necklace, $15

Mad about Monochrome

May we never forget this marvelously massive all-blue look Eilish wore alongside her pals Tierra Whack and SZA. The easiest way to replicate her ensemble is to pick one color and run with it, the small business Big Bud Press is a great, sustainable resource for unisex jumpsuits and separates in each color of the rainbow. This blue one is a slightly more toned-down version of Eilish's look, but will still have you dreaming of Camp Flog Gnaw all day.

Big Bud Press Short Sleeve Jumpsuit, $172

A Boot

BILLIE EILISH on Instagram: “if only i dressed normal id be so much hotter yeah yeah come up with a better comment im tired of that one”

We're kidding, mostly.

Braceability Stress Fracture Walking Boot, $39.99

Just Have Fun With It

Eilish might've titled her debut EP Don't Smile at Me, but she never takes herself too seriously. The best part of her style is that all of her bold and billowy looks feel true to her personality. She can't be bothered to look "hot" or traditionally feminine—she's here for a good time, and no matter what outlandish accessory she's wearing, her looks prove she's always ready to have a blast.

TV

Phoebe Waller-Bridge Brings Her Brand of Psychopathic Raunch to "SNL"

The "Fleabag" writer shines brightest (in her usual vulgar way) in her opening monologue.

Phoebe Waller-Bridge has had a successful past few years, to say the least.

The Emmy-winning writer of Fleabag and Killing Eve brought her brand of unfiltered brashness to the SNL screen this Saturday in an episode that felt like a victory lap. Still, while worth watching for any Waller-Bridge fans, the show wasn't quite able to live up to the level of comedic brilliance we've come to expect from her.

The best part was probably Waller-Bridge's opening monologue, in which she stated that everything she writes has a "grain of truth" to it, discussed genit*lia for several minutes, and definitively explained why Fleabag's "Hot Priest" is so hot: It's because he actually listens. She discussed psychopathy, which is brought to the fore on Killing Eve, and theorized that she herself might even be a psychopath (or at least, everyone she knows is). She closed with some killer lines like, "Back then horny women were to be burned at the stake. Now they're given Emmys!"

Phoebe Waller-Bridge Monologue - SNL www.youtube.com

Unfortunately, the rest of the show took a slightly downward turn following that monologue. While it might be a bit harsh to call SNL an "aging, decrepit beast that should've been put out of its misery seasons ago," as Vice did in its review of this episode, several of this show's sketches faltered dangerously. Last week's debut episode was promising with its clever depiction of the Democratic presidential candidates, but then again, those jokes kind of write themselves.

At least this episode, despite no shortage of lackluster jokes, we got to see Phoebe Waller-Bridge use many different accents and play a couple of memorable roles, including a psychopathic war wife who gallivants around with Hitler in the sketch "Words of the War." That sketch was possibly one of the episode's best, mostly thanks to Waller-Bridge's excellent deadpan and the scene's escalating absurdity. Weekend Update was also a highlight, featuring Kate McKinnon's lovably aggressive Elizabeth Warren, a well-placed Pete Davidson joke, and a flamboyant Chen Biao, played by freshman cast member Bowen Yang. "Mid-Day News" was also excellent, bringing racial politics and stereotypes to the fore as South Floridian news anchors try to determine whether the criminals they're reporting on are black or white.

Weekend Update: Chen Biao on US-China Trade War - SNL www.youtube.com


Mid-Day News - SNL www.youtube.com

On the other hand, the odd sketch "Royal Romance" made fun of Meghan Markle and Prince Harry but never quite hit its stride, and its jokes pushed the boundaries between satire and racism. Then there was the painful "Kaylee, Crystal, and Janetta," a sketch which featured four women at a bar. Perhaps meant to be a subversion of the super-feminine, stereotypical Sex and the City type of girl gang, characters portrayed are loud, tattooed, mullet-wearing, totally unfeminine, and frequently violent women. But that sketch doesn't seem to do many favors for any of them, instead asking the audience to laugh off a sequence where they each attack an ex-lover, refusing the kind of self-aware nuance that makes Fleabag such a standout example of how to write a "difficult woman" character.

Kaylee, Crystal & Janetta - SNL www.youtube.com

It's hard to say exactly why SNL has struggled so much over the past few years. Comedy writing is incredibly hard, but with all the absurdity in the modern era, we need excellent satire now more than ever to put it all into perspective. Still, the show could benefit from more diverse perspectives, more boundary-pushing and nuanced comedy, and stronger characters—the latter of which, specifically, Waller-Bridge is so good at creating. One has to wonder what would've happened had Waller-Bridge been able to write a few sketches herself.