FILM

11 Disney Plus Movies That Are Weird to Watch As Adults

Sometimes ya gotta confront the demons of your childhood, especially when they were created by a bunch of overworked, underpaid animators in a California warehouse.

If you grew up with a TV, chances are you spent a lot of your childhood watching Disney movies.

Do you ever wonder where all those images and stories went? They must be lurking around in our brains somewhere, having embedded themselves into our psyches when we were at our most impressionable.

Because of this, watching something you last saw as a six year old can be distinctly surreal, especially when you realize just how strange, messed-up, and often, wildly psychedelic so much of the media you consumed as a youth was.

Disney Plus has entered the streaming game, and naturally, it's sure to rake in billions despite the glitches. For better or for worse, Disney was part of most of our childhoods. If you're looking to tap into some of those hidden reservoirs of childhood memories and nightmares, look no further than these 11 odd films. Many of them hold up, but others are full of cracks and flaws you may never have noticed.

1. WALL-E

This heartwarming story appeared to be about a cute little robot, but it actually was very clearly about the climate crisis. In 2019, when scientists predict untold suffering due to global warming and natural disasters are picking up in speed and ferocity, WALL-E's desolate vision of global apocalypse feels...too real. Also, since Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos are considering space communities, the surreal spaceship habitat that houses all the remaining humans in WALL-E hits a bit too close to home.

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2. Fantasia

This film was made in 1940, and if you view any of the clips, you'll notice that every frame seems to have been spawned from some sort of psychedelic experience. What was Fantasia? What is Fantasia? The truth is that no one really knows—Fantasia exists beyond human comprehension, in a sphere all its own—but the music is magnificent and the imagery is so surreal that you'll be amazed that you just accepted it as a kid.

syfy.com

3. Sleeping Beauty

This film was made in 1959, so it can be forgiven for its lack of feminist sensibility, but still… watching the prince plant a totally non-consensual kiss on a woman who is mostly only known as "Sleeping Beauty" is rather disorienting. If you're a woman who was raised on princess movies but are still wondering why you're having so much trouble getting over the impulse to be shy, submissive, and acquiescent, look no further. (The same goes for Snow White, who also goes to live in a house with seven strange men).

1000-Word-Philosophy

4. Robin Hood

Robin Hood was kind of a militant socialist. If you've been motivated by Bernie Sanders in recent years or have been organizing since you were a teen, watching this movie and seeing Robin Hood's dedication to redistributing the wealth can feel oddly resonant and inspiring.

animationsource.org

5. Hannah Montana

This isn't a movie, but watching Miley Cyrus gallivant around in her blonde wig as the super innocent, ultra-perky Hannah Montana will inevitably be disorienting for the adult viewer. Cyrus has spoken openly about the struggles she went through while filming the show, saying that playing Hannah Montana made her "hate her body" and leveling other critiques at the franchise. Watching the show is eerie in that it'll remind you of the days of your innocent youth—before you ever saw Miley Cyrus naked (which simply became a rite of passage around 2012)—but maybe it'll also make you realize that you have a lot of internalized sexism.

HANNAH MONTANA: THE MOVIE, Miley Cyrus, 2009. Photo: Sam Emerson/ ©Walt Disney Co./courtesy Everett Entertainment Weekly


6. Dumbo

Is this movie a critique of animal abuse or an insane, racist acid trip, or a bit of both? The crows are racist (their leader is literally named Jim Crow), and there's a racist song, etcetera. In one scene, baby Dumbo gets drunk and hallucinates a parade of pink elephants. Scarring? Undeniably. Poor Dumbo. This movie is almost sadder to watch as an adult knowing just how sad Dumbo's plight actually is.

Dumbo's dream www.youtube.com

7. The Black Cauldron

This movie is not as well-known outside of Disney aficionados, as its release almost brought down the entire franchise. Made during Disney's "dark period" when the company was experimenting with horror and new technologies, this genuinely creepy movie is often called the "darkest Disney movie ever." I definitely remember watching this as a kid and being seriously terrified by the skeleton crew and onscreen suicides in this film. In that way, it makes sense that the film has amassed a cult following largely made up of the generation it scarred for life. Sometimes ya gotta confront the demons of your childhood, especially when they were created by a bunch of overworked, underpaid animators in a Glendale warehouse.

Rich Menga

8. Alice in Wonderland

Like Fantasia, some of the imagery in this movie is undeniably eerie and almost too surreal. The fact that Alice winds up at a strange luncheon with a Mad Hatter where time doesn't exist? That she takes something that makes her grow small, then large? That she falls down a rabbit hole? What drugs were the people who made this movie on? Or perhaps the better question: What weren't they on? As a child watching this movie, I imagine that I developed some strange ideas about reality and rabbits that haunted me to adulthood. Also, the movie brings up complex questions about physics, math, philosophy and more—that's a lot for a children's fairytale.

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9. Beauty and the Beast

This one has also been discussed ad nauseum, but Belle...lets a man imprison her and then falls in love with him. This is Stockholm Syndrome at its finest. She gets imprisoned and then marries the man who imprisons her. Sure, it's a tale as old as time, but I think that in the recent live-action remake, we all let our feelings about Emma Watson's vocals and the Beast's anthropomorphization overtake the simple strangeness of the tale.

Crosswalk the Musical: Beauty and the Beast www.youtube.com

10. Cars

Cars is full of adult humor, from the stoner hippie bus character Fillmore to the scene where Lightning McQueen's fans "flash" him. Actually, it's implied that the cars have sex, so that says more than enough. What universe is this?

Slate.com

11. Hunchback of Notre Dame

This movie is adorable and charming in a lot of ways, but it also has an undercurrent of disturbing sadism and sexual violence. Frollo harasses Esmeralda to no end, and she's almost executed at the end of the film. There's torture, death, abuse, hallucinations…

Then again, all that is part of what made Disney movies so enduring, right? Kids get exposed to a lot growing up, and if all Disney films were all squeaky-clean and innocent, that would defeat the purpose of stories, which are meant to relate to people and resonate across ages and demographics. That doesn't mean that it's not strange to look back on these films after a while, but what's funny is that a lot of these strange films were also some of Disney's greatest. If anything, the grains of reality that Disney built into their fanciful stories are what make these films that much more powerful and timeless.

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"Stranger Things" star Joe Keery sits down with Jean-Ralphio from "Parks and Rec" on the Late Late Show with James Corden to address a pressing fan theory.

Steve Harrington, the pretty-boy of Hawkins High on Netflix's hit series "Stranger Things", sports a classic Polo-preppy boy look. But he also shares a considerable physical resemblance to Parks and Rec's Jean Ralphio. Considering the show's timeline, which places Steve Harrington in the 80s in Indiana, and Jean Ralphio's location in Pawnee, Indiana just 30 years later, it's quite possible that Steve Harrington was, in fact, Jean Ralphio's father! Or so the fans have speculated.


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Ahn sojin dead suicide

South Korean singer Ahn Sojin has died from apparent suicide on the afternoon of February 24.

According to reports, the 22-year-old was found unconscious in the garden of an apartment building in Daegu—unfortunately, she passed away while being transported to the hospital.

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Sojin shot to fame last year as a finalist on the reality TV singing competition The KARA Project, which was searching for a new member to join KARA, one of Asia's most successful girl groups. Despite making it to the finals, she lost out to 20-year-old Heo Youngji, who went on to have great success with the group.

During her tenure on the series, Sojin expressed that joining KARA could be her last chance at pop stardom, as Korean pop idols often have trouble debuting after age 23 in the notoriously fickle music market.

"It has to be this or nothing," she said on the show's first episode. "I can't miss this."

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She had also revealed that her family wasn't supportive of her decision to pursue a career as a singer, especially her father.

KARA's record company, DSP Media, reportedly dissolved Sojin's contract as a trainee last month, right before announcing plans to launch a new girl group this year.

Whether or not any of this factored into her suicide remains unclear, but it would be surprising if it didn't.

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Since news of her death broke this afternoon, #RIPSojin has been the No. 1 trending topic on Twitter worldwide, proving that she was loved by many K-pop fans despite never quite making it as a pop idol like she'd always dreamed.

You can check out our photo gallery of Sojin below.

If you, or anyone you know is struggling with thoughts of suicide please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or visit their website

It looked like A Pink were going to land their first No. 1 single this week with "LUV," but the adorable girl group were blocked from the top by legendary ballad singer Park Hyo Shin's new single, "Happy Together."

"LUV" settles for second place, but A Pink can be compensated in the fact that all five tracks from their new mini-album managed to debut in the top fifty.

A few spots down, EXID's "Up And Down" jumps a huge 27 places to No. 7. As Popdust previously reported, the sudden popularity of "Up And Down" is all down to a fan-recorded video of member Hani performing the song's sexy choreography that went viral in Korea a fortnight ago.

AOA's "Like a Cat" spends a third week in the top ten at No. 10, while rapper LOCO debuts at No. 19 with "You Don't Know."

GOT7's "Stop Stop It" --despite its disappointing debut last week-- manages to spend a second week in the top forty at No. 38, while MAMAMOO's "Piano Man" rockets up 46 places to No. 41.

MBLAQ's gorgeous seasonal ballad "Spring, Summer, Fall, And... Winter" arrives at No. 60, followed by Sunny Hill's "Here I Am" at No. 68.

Ex-KARA member Nicole continues to struggle with her solo single "MAMA," which slips down to No. 80, but it's nothing compared to T-ara's Korean remake of the Chinese novelty hit "Little Apple," which debuts at No. 91 -- the lowest position of the group's career. However, considering that it's just a one-off special collaboration single that isn't being fully promoted in Korea, you can't really hold its chart position up to T-ara's official single releases.

Check out this week's new K-pop hits below.

No. 2. A Pink - LUV

No. 7. EXID - Up And Down

No. 41. MAMAMOO - Piano Man

No. 60. MBLAQ - Spring, Summer, Fall, And... Winter

No. 91. T-ara - Little Apple

Despite a handful of glossy new K-pop hits dropping over the last fortnight, it's the ballads that are winning big on the charts right now.

This week's No. 1 single belongs to Toy, the one-man project band of You Hee-yeol (who many people will know from his Sketchbook TV series). He tops the chart with "Three Of Us," while most of the tracks from his new album, Da Capo, have all debuted within the top twenty somewhere.

Kyuhyun's "At Gwanghwamun" stays at No. 2 for a second week, while last week's chart-topper, Hi Suhyun's "I'm Different," slips to No. 4.

BIGBANG's latest subunit, GD X TAEYANG, arrive at No. 5 with their debut single, "Good Boy," which is lower than what one would expect from the popular pair. Their YG Entertainment labelmates, Hi Suhyun, were able to reach No. 1 just last week with their own unit single, while Taeyang currently has the second-highest-selling hit of the year with "Eyes, Nose Lips." Perhaps the electro-hop style of "Good Boy" just isn't what Koreans are into right now?

A few spots down, AOA's "Like a Cat" slips 5-7 in its second week, while GOT7 debut at No. 25 with "Stop Stop It"--their lowest-charting single yet. On a positive note, the boy band's first studio album, Identity, managed to top the albums chart.

The biggest mover and shaker this week has to be girl group EXID, whose three-month-old single, "Up & Down," rockets to No. 34 after initially not cracking the top 100 back when it was first released. The song's sleeper hit status is all thanks to a fancam of one of the members performing the song's sexy choreography, which has become a viral sensation in Korea and turned "Up & Down" into an overnight smash. You can expect the song to climb even higher next week, possibly even making the top ten.

Further down at No. 69 is ex-KARA member Nicole, who tanks with her first solo single, "MAMA." The Sweetune-produced song has been a flop so far, but it's still hanging around in the mid-sixties on the real-time digital charts, so it probably won't leave the Gaon chart for at least another week or two.

However, Nicole still managed to perform better than girl group MAMAMOO, who arrive at No. 87 with their new single, "Piano Man." This is the quartet's lowest-charting single to date, even when including their pre-releases and OSTs.

Check out this week's new K-pop hits below!

No. 5. GD X TAEYANG - Good Boy

No. 25. GOT7 - Stop Stop It

No. 34. EXID - Up & Down

No. 69. Nicole - MAMA

No. 87. MAMAMOO - Piano Man

After debuting at No. 1 last week with "Empty," YG Entertainment's new boy band WINNER have been dethroned by Jang Bum Joon. The former Busker Busker guitarist and vocalist slides in at No. 1 with "Difficult Woman," pushing WINNER to second place.

Newbie Park Boram is showing a lot of longevity with her first single "Beautiful," which is down just one spot to No. 3, while SHINee's Taemin makes a solid solo debut with "Danger" at No. 5.

Veteran girl group KARA, who recently lost two members and gained a new one, arrive at No. 17 with their new single "Mamma Mia." This is weak compared to the group's usual chart ranking, but when you take into consideration that they just reshuffled their lineup, as well as the fact that "Mamma Mia" seems to be holding up on the various real-time digital charts, a top twenty debut really isn't too shabby at all.

A few spots lower is Orange Caramel's "My Copycat," which enters at No. 22. This is the trio's lowest-charting single ever, but lately the K-pop charts have been more about longevity than one-week peaks, so we'll see how this does in the long run.

Speaking of girl groups with low charting singles, SECRET's "I'm In Love" plummets to No. 29 after debuting at No. 14 last week, while poor Sunny Hill just flopped beyond belief with "Monday Blues" at No. 96.

However, even Sunny Hill can't match STELLAR in flopping, with the controversial girl group's new single "Mask" missing the top 100 altogether. STELLAR were never big on the charts to begin with, but they did score a surprise top forty hit earlier this year with the amazing "Marionette," so it's sad to see that the equally-as-good "Mask" has failed to continue their winning streak.

Check out this week's new K-pop hits, below.

No. 1. Jang Bum Joon - Difficult Woman

No. 5. Taemin - Danger

No. 17. KARA - Mamma Mia

No. 22. Orange Caramel - My Copycat

No. 96. Sunny Hill - Monday Blues

No. ???. STELLAR - Mask