Music Features

FKA twigs Sues Shia LaBeouf for Physical and Emotional Abuse

"What I went through with Shia was the worst thing I've ever been through," the musician said of her actor ex-boyfriend.

FKA twigs

Content warning: This article contains description of sexual assault.

Musician FKA twigs has sued her ex-boyfriend, actor Shia LaBeouf, citing "relentless" physical, emotional, and mental abuse.

"I'd like to be able to raise awareness on the tactics that abusers use to control you and take away your agency," twigs, born Tahliah Barnett, told the New York Times. In the lawsuit, she cited a 2019 incident in which she was on a road trip with LaBeouf, who was driving, as he threatened to crash the car unless she professed her love for him. After finally letting Barnett out of the car at a nearby gas station, LaBeouf allegedly assaulted her, marking one of many instances in which the musician said her ex-boyfriend had abused her throughout their almost year-long relationship.

LaBeouf and Barnett met in 2018 on the set of Honey Boy, a largely autobiographical film written by the former. Once their "honeymoon phase" wore off, Barnett said LeBeouf began exemplifying controlling behavior, to the point where she was unable to fulfill work responsibilities. Her critically-acclaimed 2019 album, MAGDALENE, was delayed as a result.

"I just thought to myself, no one is ever going to believe me," Barnett told the Times. "I'm unconventional. And I'm a person of color who is a female...What I went through with Shia was the worst thing I've ever been through in the whole of my life."

Barnett's lawsuit also mentions plans to donate a large portion of any monetary damages to domestic violence charities.

If you or someone you know is a victim of domestic violence, you can call 800-799-SAFE (7233), or chat live at the National Domestic Violence Hotline's website.

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The 10 Best Nostalgia TV Shows for Regressing During Quarantine

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The world is a mess, politics are ridiculous, and a global pandemic is killing thousands of people every day. Who wants to deal with any of that–let alone being stuck inside, thrown off your usual routine, with everyone obsessing over a documentary about animal cruelty and a reality show starlet who dropping racial slurs? No, what you need right now is not some new crazy drama to obsess over or any kind of grown-up distraction—you need a time machine that can take you to a simpler era. Short of that, these 10 shows from the late '80s to the early 2000s are among the best ways to turn off your brain and pretend to be a kid again.

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FILM

2020 Golden Globes Nominations: 5 Exciting Surprises and 5 Outrageous Snubs

Where is the love for "Little Women" and Adam Sandler?

Emma Watson, Florence Pugh, Saoirse Ronan, and Eliza Scanlen in Little Women

Sony

Awards season is about to kick into high gear after the release of the 2020 Golden Globes nominations.

The Golden Globes are one of the more chaotic and entertaining award shows. Between the abundance of star power in the room and the amount of alcohol they consume, the Globes are a fun watch from start to finish. With that being said, the Globes and its voting body, the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, are also an important feature of awards season. If actors, actresses, and their films are hoping for an Oscar nomination, a successful stint at the Globes will strengthen their campaign.

After the 2020 film nominations were announced, Twitter users, not surprisingly, had their opinions. There were some great surprises involving Parasite and Knives Out. There were also some disappointing snubs regarding Little Women and Uncut Gems. Here are five exciting surprises and five outrageous snubs.

Surprise: Bong Joon Ho, Best Director for Parasite

Madman Films

Choi Woo-shik, Song Kang-ho, Jang Hye-jin, and Park So-dam in Parasite.

Bong Joon Ho wrote and directed the masterpiece that is Parasite, but receiving a best director nomination was no guarantee. Remember that both Jordan Peele and Greta Gerwig missed out on Best Director at the 75th Golden Globes (Peele and Gerwig received Oscar nominations for directing), so Bong receiving a nomination is a tremendous surprise. Parasite is not only one of the most critically acclaimed films of the year but of the decade.

Shia LaBeouf's story is also the story of the Internet's history.

A young, troubled franchise star who took a turn for the absurd and rapidly became a gigantic and multifaceted meme, LaBeouf has had a multitude of infamous online moments that have solidified his position as one of the technosphere's earliest and most enduring gods.

Most recently, he's come back onto Twitter's list of trending topics after being featured on Hot Ones, a show that features celebrities getting candid eating hot sauce. While on the show, he ate a spicy chicken wing and cried, likened the process of making his upcoming biopic Honey Boy to an "exorcism," and also talked about his friendship with Kanye West and the time he wrestled Tom Hardy naked.

Shia LaBeouf Sheds a Tear While Eating Spicy Wings | Hot Ones www.youtube.com

This seems like as good a time as any to bring up something that has haunted me for nearly eight years. "Actual Cannibal Shia LaBeouf"—the song, the dance, and the animated video—is something that appears in my life from time to time, flaring up like an STD or a recurring nightmare.

"Shia LaBeouf" Live - Rob Cantor www.youtube.com

The song, titled simply "Shia LaBeouf," was written by Rob Cantor, who insists that it is nothing more or less than a joke based on how funny Shia LaBeouf's name sounds when you whisper it. He posted the song as a SoundCloud link, which quickly went viral. In 2014, the music video—featuring dancers, the Gay Men's Choir, the Los Angeles Children's Choir, and a cameo from LaBeouf himself—was released. The song tells the story of a person being pursued relentlessly by a bloodthirsty version of Shia LaBeouf. This Shia, hungry for human flesh, is seen brandishing a knife as he chases the narrator (referred to as "you") through the woods.

A blend between horror and parody, kitsch and gore, the video quickly wound its way into my subconscious, where it has remained and festered. In some ways, the cannibal Shia seems to live in the Internet's subconscious, too, a kind of Jungian archetype for the technological era that rebounds as quickly as it fades away into the half-light of our collective attention deficit.

The song is about fear, but fear of what? Fear of the abstract disconnect that arises from the void of the impending apocalypse? Fear of losing touch, of descending back into the primal darkness of the pre-phone charger world? Fear of social media's tendency to cannibalize itself, to swallow our identities and regurgitate them as algorithmic cash cows? Fear of the cult of celebrity, of the onset of capitalism, of climate change?

Actually, after hearing LaBeouf speak about his upcoming biopic, my newest theory is that the song is truly about Shia LaBeouf being pursued by Shia LaBeouf's demons (who take the form of the actual cannibal). LaBeouf has plenty of them, after all. He told Variety that his upcoming biopic is about his troubled upbringing with his abusive father, with whom he lived in a motel in Hollywood while a child star on Disney Channel. "I had a flashlight and was rummaging through the attics of my soul trying to figure stuff out, figuring my past out," he said, explaining the film's inspiration. Or was he running through the woods of his past? Running for his life from Shia LaBeouf? Aren't we all?

I don't know. I only know that even though my therapist says that Shia LaBeouf can't hurt me, I'm walking in the woods and my phone is dead. Then I see him. He gets down on all fours and breaks into a sprint. He's brandishing a knife. Killing for sport. Sometimes there are bear traps, and what we think are safe houses actually contain our worst nightmares. Sometimes we can't outrun the actual cannibal Shia LaBeoufs of our past. Fortunately, I know Jiu Jitsu.

Actual Cannibal Shia Labeouf (Song: Rob Cantor) www.youtube.com

CULTURE

Hottest Celebrities if You’re Looking to Settle Down

Which celebrity would you want to marry?

Everybody's always gossiping about which celebrity has the hottest bod or the biggest tush, but nobody ever talks about what really matters.

Sure, you could be with a real hunk like Justin Bieber, but what are you going to talk about – his hair? No way. It's time to focus on the important stuff. Which celebrities have the hottest personalities?

Chris Evans

chris evans hot

Chris Evans is proof that someone can be classically handsome and also have a winning personality. Just like Captain America, Chris Evans is a loud and proud ally, defending everyone's right to be themselves.

Steve Buscemi

steve buscemi hot

Steve Buscemi has a real smoking personality, which makes sense because he's also a firefighter. In fact, he volunteered to help save people from the wreckage during the 9/11 attacks. But that's just Steve, always helping the people around him.

Ken Jeong

ken jeong hot

Ken Jeong is funny and determined, considering he left his job as a doctor to become the guy in the Hangover! He would always encourage you to pursue your dreams, and that's a personality worth pining for.

Tom Hanks

tom hanks hot

Tom Hanks didn't just play a nice guy in Big. He's also a big nice guy. Everyone who's ever met Tom Hanks agrees that he's just a really nice, genial guy who loves to laugh and say hi to fans. My step-dad ran into him in Central Park once and said he was nice too.

Jonah Hill

jonah hill hot 2018 MET Museum Costume Institute Benefit Gala, New York, USA - 07 May 2018

Jonah Hill just seems like one of those guys you could really chill out with. He'd be down to smoke a joint, but he'd also talk about your problems if you wanted. But there also wouldn't be any pressure, you guys could just mess around with skateboards and he'd be cool about it.

Danny Trejo

danny trejo hot

Danny Trejo might look tough, but he's a big softie. He tries to live his life as an example for young, struggling kids so they don't need to go through the hardships he had to endure. As such, his personality isn't just hot, it's seasoned!

Shia LaBeouf

shia labeouf hot

Shia LaBeouf is intense, and that passion lights a fire in my britches. He'd definitely talk a lot about cool new art projects and performance pieces that would go way over my head, but he'd also try to make me feel included.

Samuel L. Jackson

samuel l jackson hot

Samuel L. Jackson's personality is really badass. He was actually in the black panthers when he was younger, so you know he's always willing to fight for what he believes in. That means he'll always be willing to protect you.

Bill Murray

bill murray hot

Bill Murray is the bad boy of personalities. Known for pulling pranks and being mean to people in public, but only as a joke, Bill Murray would be the kind of guy who might make you work for his approval. But once you got it, that would be so satisfying.


Dan Kahan is a writer & screenwriter from Brooklyn, usually rocking a man bun. Find more at dankahanwriter.com


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FILM & TV

FILM | Borg McEnroe... not the film you're expecting...

REVIEW | This Swedish produced film offers a refreshingly non-anglocentric look at tennis' greatest rivalry

An uncommon cinematic occurrence

What we see with Borg McEnroe is hyper-competent filmmaking, relatively free of bells and whistles, but with an emphasis on perspective that distinguishes it from other sports movies of its ilk. Focusing on the tennis rivalry between Björn Borg and John McEnroe that came to a head in the Wimbledon final of 1980, the film tells a story of aspiration and focus that differentiates itself from similar biopics. It does this principally through its use of Borg as the eye of the audience, and its decision to reject a "talent vs. technique" storyline in favor of a more subtle approach. This results in a nail-biter of a film which quietly decries conventional modern myths of excellence and thus makes for a refreshing watch.

Director Janus Metz Pedersen and writer Ronnie Sandahl focus the action of the film around the Wimbledon tournament of 1980, with diversions back into the formative years of Borg and McEnroe. Although more weight is given to Borg on the whole. It is telling that this is a Swedish film, in that Borg is very much the film's hero. His arc is given more weight, he is eventually the film's "winner" (they finish on him beating McEnroe in 1980, rather than choosing to continue to the 1981 final in which McEnroe beat Borg), and, in Swedish releases of the film, it is simply titled Borg. While this is potentially jarring, it finishes out as enlightening, in that the film is shot through a non-Anglo-Centric lens. As such, an American/British audience gets a window on a well-known moment in sports-culture from the Swedish perspective. An uncommon cinematic occurrence.

That's not to say that McEnroe is neglected, if anything, this is the most sympathetic he has ever appeared. The common ground between the two players (who barely meet over the course of the film) is consistently shown to be their fragility. Known professionally for being cool on the court, in his younger years Borg is shown to be as volatile as his American rival. Similarly, while this story is plum for a black swan interpretation of McEnroe as incendiary savant and Borg as calculated physical scientist, the film instead opts to show the pair as both products of training and natural skill. Their difference in composure on the court is more to do with how crowds and news media cast them narratively. At their core they are much more similar than most people are willing to give credit. As such McEnroe is, save a few choice moments, largely spared the "rock 'n' roll bad boy" depiction which one expects. His journey, like Borg's, is one of self-doubt and learning to overcome it. If anything, Borg is treated like the rockstar, and even then, it's more of a Lennon-esque stifling by fame.

In light of this, Shia LaBeouf feels perfectly cast here. He and McEnroe cast a similar public shadow. LaBeouf is a consummate worker, and it shows here. He nails McEnroe's on court aggression, but also plays his demure moments with sensitivity. Sverrir Gudnason as Björn Borg is a great fit. His resemblance to the tennis legend is spot on, and his effortful control as Borg on court matches up with his private moments of raw emotionality. His relationship with mentor Lennart Bergelin (played by Stellan Skarsgård) is particularly interesting, bordering on more sympathetic Salieri-Mozart dynamic.

You can tell this is not an American film. We are spared a redemption arc for McEnroe, and a "getting back in touch" montage for Borg, the period music is sparing, and McEnroe's eventual victory over Borg is cited more as a moment of cosmic balance than as the culmination of McEnroe's efforts. Their rivalry is rarely played as such, they more exist in a state of symbiotic antagonism. The world wants them to be enemies, but, if anything, they are the only two people in the world who understand each other. Borg McEnroe is a film that takes a moment in history that everyone has accepted the pop-culture narrative for, and then opens a new window on it. Recommended viewing for fans of sports films, and good independent cinema alike.

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