It all started with "Kissgate" in 2014.

A blurry photo of Taylor Swift and Karlie Kloss allegedly making out spread like wildfire across the internet, only to be quickly debunked by a rep for the singer. Regardless, the conspiracy theory remained prevalent, with fans dedicating an exorbitant amount of time to unearthing The Truth: that Swift and Kloss had been secretly dating for years.

Swift has always had a dedicated fanbase in the queer community, and rightfully so. For years the singer has been a powerful LGBTQ ally. But she also has a long history of queerbaiting. If you don't know, queerbaiting is defined as a "marketing technique for fiction and entertainment in which creators hint at, but then do not actually depict, same-sex romance or other LGBTQ representation." Swift's career has been rampant with it.

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Culture Feature

Dear White People: AAVE Is an Actual Dialect, Not Your "Stan Culture"

Using a Black dialect isn't a meme—it's cultural appropriation.

As Black Lives Matter protests have rightfully taken the world by storm over the past couple of months, we're long overdue for thorough evaluations of just how often aspects of Black heritage have been co-opted by white audiences.

It should be obvious that much of fashion and music as we know it today was invented by Black people. We (hopefully) all know by now that we can no longer accept Blackface and use of the n-word by non-Black people as the norm—and Internet users have tried "canceling" offenders in the public eye, with varying degrees of success.

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