New Releases

"Garden Song" Is One of Phoebe Bridgers' Most Stunning Songs Yet

It's the singer-songwriter's first new solo music since her 2017 debut album.

Olof Grind

It's been two and a half years since Phoebe Bridgers' debut album, Stranger in the Alps, but the singer-songwriter has kept herself unimaginably busy.

From her instant-classic boygenius EP with Julien Baker and Lucy Dacus to her duo with Conor Oberst, Better Oblivion Community Center, fans of Bridgers have had plenty to feast on. But it appears a second solo album could be imminent, as she's shared a stunning new single called "Garden Song."

In line with the gentle indie folk that's become synonymous with Bridgers' solo work, "Garden Song" begins with a driving, ascendant acoustic guitar riff, made only dreamier by its heavy reverb. Inspired by her Los Angeles hometown and the nightmares she experiences on tour, the lyrics are among Bridgers' most idyllic: "When I grow up I'm gonna look up from my phone and see my life / And it's gonna be just like my recurring dream," she sings in one of the song's most jarring lines.

Bridgers also enlisted her tour manager, a "6-foot-7 Dutch man named Jeroen," to provide backing vocals on "Garden Song," and his weighty baritone is subtly heard in the choruses to give the track an added depth. "I don't how but I'm taller / It must be something in the water," they sing. "No, I'm not afraid of hard work / I get everything I want, I have everything I wanted." One of Bridgers' most simply beautiful songs to date, nearly every aspect of "Garden Song" tries to stop you in your tracks.

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Music Lists

Slept On: New Releases from UnoTheActivist, SahBabii, and More

SahBabii, UnoTheActivist and more make up this weeks under appreciated releases

Juice WRLD's posthumous release, Legends Never Die, has already sold over 400,000 copies, putting it in the running for the biggest release of 2020.

Meanwhile, Summer Walker confidently returns with a sleek new E.P., Kid Cudi and Marshall Mathers unite for the first time, James Blake quietly dropped a shadowy new track, and H.E.R. added a splash of reggae flavor to her new track "Do To Me." While it was a big week for the mainstream, it was equally as massive for the underground. Upcoming mumble emcee SahBabii's released an infectious collection of wavy, levitative hip-hop, and the iconic Fresh Veggies duo of Casey Veggies and Rockie Fresh return for their second outing. Check out the latest underground releases below.

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TV

Would Conor Oberst Be a Good Late-Night Production Assistant?

The Bright Eyes frontman and his fellow musician, Phoebe Bridgers, appeared in a mockumentary segment called "Meet the CONAN Staff."

Courtesy of CONAN

What would happen if your favorite artist suddenly switched careers and became a production assistant on a late night talk show?

The CONAN team has given us a hint on what that strange scenario might look like. On the latest episode of "Meet the CONAN Staff"—a mockumentary series depicting behind-the-scenes shenanigans—Bright Eyes frontman Conor Oberst walks us through a day in the life of his new job.

"I sort of stumbled into the role of being the voice of the emo and indie rock movement," Oberst explains. "But that was just to pay the bills. Really, I wanted to break into late-night television production. I guess you could say I'm the Happy Gilmore of emo." But, like any assistant job, he faces his share of difficulties. Worst of all, he can't shake the habit of breaking out into his trademark quivering vocals: "The transition's been a little rocky. My brain is just so good at coming up with sad songs about how we're just pawns in this f--ked up game, that sometimes the lyrics just slip out."

Of course, Oberst isn't alone in his job. In this comical alternate reality, he works alongside his Better Oblivion Community Center bandmate, Phoebe Bridgers. Although Oberst's try-hard attitude gets some flack from his superiors, Bridgers naturally exudes an effortless cool factor. "Yeah, I'll probably do this for a while," Bridgers says. "But it's kind of a bullsh*t job."

Watch the clip and delight in the sad songs of late night TV below.

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