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Black History Month Watchlist 2022

Best movies new and streaming for Black History Month in February 2022

via HBO

February is here, and with it comes hoards of content for us to celebrate Black History Month — and while some of it is genuinely inspiring, much of it is tired and trite.

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Kim Kardashian, Black Culture, and the Fickleness of Mainstream Acceptance

The Kardashians are moving on from Black culture and mainstream pop culture is moving on with them

Kim Kardashian

Evan Agostini/Invision/AP/Shutterstock

Over the last decade, aesthetics drawn from hip hop and media became mainstream.

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TV Features

INTERVIEW: Ms. Pat talks Matt Damon, Ugly Grandchildren, and Her New Series on BET+

The Ms Pat Show premieres August 12th on BET+

Photography by Tony Tyus via Loshak PR

Miss Pat is a comedian, author, and actress. Her new BET+ Series, The Ms Pat Show, premieres August 12th.

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Culture Feature

This Haunts Me: Miley Cyrus's Twerking Phase

It was the cultural appropriation olympics and Miley was getting all the gold.

Miley Cyrus

By Kobby Dagan // Shutterstock

Imagine if, in the year of our Lord 2021, a white woman claimed to invent twerking.

She would be so swiftly canceled that there wouldn't be a discussion. You'd log into twitter in an attempt to get in on the action and your timeline would be a mess of memes, carnage, and the occasional #woke thread straight out of Race Theory: 101.

In 2021, some people might defend whichever celebrity was trending in an #overparty hashtag, but the majority of the internet would guilt said white woman into making a teary apology on Instagram live.

However, this was not the case in 2013 when Miley Cyrus woke up and chose violence.

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Friday Film Club: Andra Day Anchors "The United States vs Billie Holiday"

The "Strange Fruit" singer is an example of the toll celebrity takes on vulnerable women, especially Black women.

The last in the triptych of blockbuster Black movies premiering this Black history month — the former being Malcom & Marie and Judas and the Black Messiah — is the biographical feature film The United States vs Billie Holiday.

The Billie Holiday biopic has been long in the works. Finally, the story of Billie Holiday and her persecution by the US government is streaming on Hulu.

Big names have all teamed up to carry the weight of the story, from director Lee Daniels of The Butler to a screenplay based on the book Chasing the Scream: The First and Last Days of the War on Drugs by Johann Hari adapted by award winning-playwright Suzan Lori-Parks. The film also stars Trevante Rhodes of Moonlight, Da'Vine Joy Randolph of High Fidelity, and Andra Day, Grammy award-winning singer-songwriter known for "Rise Up" as Holiday herself.

The United States vs. Billie Holiday - Trailer (Official) • A Hulu Originalwww.youtube.com

The film sees Holiday at the height of her career, battling the censorship from the government, racism in her life and around her, and a drug addiction. The United States vs Billie Holiday makes clear that Holiday's smear campaigns, surveillance, and brief imprisonment were an effort to stop her from singing "Strange Fruit" — a carefully calculated operation by the Federal Bureau of Narcotics who feared Holiday's song would incite protest and unrest.

The song "Strange Fruit," known as one of the first and greatest commercial protest songs, is a haunting, unflinching condemnation of lynching and is now Holiday's legacy; but most people don't know its significance to Holiday nor the country.

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Lupita Nyong'o's "Sulwe" at Netflix Is an Important Step for Representation of Black Girls

Netflix just picked up "Sulwe" by Lupita Nyong'o, a book about a girl "the color of midnight"

Sulwe, the children's book by Oscar-winning actress Lupita Nyong'o is coming to Netflix as an animated musical.

The book is about a girl born "the color of midnight" and her journey to self-acceptance. Based in part on Nyong'o's own experience as a dark-skinned woman, the semi-autobiographical book boasts/carries themes of self-love and anti-colorism.

Nyong'o, who struggled with self-image as a child because of her skin tone, called the book "a mirror for dark-skinned children to see themselves, a window for those who may not be familiar with colorism."

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