Devon

Press Photo

A rising star from Philadelphia, Devon releases her stripped-down acoustic version of Charli XCX's "Boys."

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Music Features

On This Day: Shakira Liberated Everyone's “She Wolf”

"I was in the studio in a bad mood that day, then I got inspired and went to a corner and I wrote the lyrics and the melody in 10 minutes. The image of the she wolf just came to my head, and when I least expected it I was howling and panting," Shakira said.

By Fabio Alexx

11 years ago, on July 10th, 2009, Colombian singer Shakira released the first single off her third studio album.

"She Wolf" is a synth-pop banger built on a B minor progression. It was, in many ways, an insane song, born out of the singer's own frustration and ennui.

"I was in the studio in a bad mood that day, then I got inspired and went to a corner and I wrote the lyrics and the melody in 10 minutes. The image of the she wolf just came to my head, and when I least expected it I was howling and panting," Shakira said.

Though the music was composed by John Hill and Sam Endicott, lead singer of post-punk band The Bravery, the lyrics were all Shakira's own. "[Shakira] contacted him (Hill), asking if he had any stuff," said Endicott. "We never had her in mind. We just made the thing independently of her, and then she liked it a lot, and she sang over it. She used some of the melodies we put in there and then wrote these crazy lyrics about being a werewolf. And that's how it happened."

Shakira - She Wolf www.youtube.com


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Music Features

How the Digitized Weirdness of PC Music Became Pop's New Normal

With Charli XCX's quarantine album How I'm Feeling Now coming out this week, we look back on how her frequent collaborator, PC Music founder A. G. Cook, helped shape today's pop music.

A. G. Cook in the studio with Charli XCX and Caroline Polachek.

Courtesy of A. G. Cook

Last year saw the release of one of the most exciting and distinct pop albums in recent history: 1000 gecs by 100 gecs.

100 gecs' divisive, maximalist sound is just as fresh as it is peculiarly reminiscent of niche trends of the 2000s. Those who grew up among the Myspace-centric "scene kid" subculture likened the experimental duo to groups like Blood on the Dance Floor, the Millionaires, and Brokencyde. Others compared their blown-out production to that of dubstep DJs like Skrillex and Bassnectar. Some people couldn't stand 100 gecs, but everyone else couldn't get enough.

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