Culture News

Why Amazon's "Crucible" Game Needs to Fail

Crucible needs to fail. Thankfully, it already is.

Amazon

Boasting a massive budget, veteran talent sniped from some of the top gaming studios, and a gameplay experience tailor-made for Twitch streaming, Crucible represents Amazon's first major effort to break into the gaming industry as a first-party developer.

Presumably tired of just raking in all the money from third-part video games sales, Amazon, which straight-up owns Twitch, is hoping to replace streamer-favorite games like Fortnite, Overwatch, and League of Legends with their own. This is a major red flag for the future of video game streaming. A major company that controls advertisement space and means of distribution will most likely not play fair when they have their own content on the line, too. Amazon has already screwed over plenty of small business in all sorts of market spaces, and with their plans to create a cloud-based video game platform, it seems obvious that they're gearing up for a not-so-discreet monopoly in video games, too.

Keep Reading Show less
Music Features

On This Day: Hip-Hop Forever Changed America

Happy birthday to the world's biggest genre

On this day in 1973, Clive Campbell, the Jamaican-American "selector" known as DJ Kool Herc, hosted a "back to school jam" at 1520 Sedgewick Avenue in the Boogie Down Bronx of New York City.

Armed with a booming sound system and reggae beats, Herc– a shortened nickname for "Hercules"– commanded insatiable audiences across the South Bronx with his unique looping technique called the "Merry-Go Round." "[I knew that] they were waiting for this particular break," Herc later said, "and I got a couple of records that got the same break up in it. I wonder how it would be if I put them all together."

Keep Reading Show less
Culture Feature

Loot Boxes: The Legal Gambling Loophole for Kids

Is there any defense for video game loot boxes?

Nate Barrett/Digital Trends

Back in the '90s and early 2000s, buying a video game for a home console meant gaining access to everything that game would ever have to offer.

Sure, sometimes there were cheats that could only be accessed through a Game Genie, and in Pokemon's case, your mom might have needed to stand with you in a two-hour line at the mall so an official Nintendo rep could manually trade you Mew. But by and large, the $60 purchase price of pre-PS3 era console games was all-inclusive.


Keep Reading Show less