Culture Feature

Is Naomi Osaka a Real-Life Disney Princess?

The young tennis superstar demonstrated her gentle touch with a butterfly at the Australian Open.

On Friday, Japanese tennis superstar Naomi Osaka paused during a match with Tunisia's Ons Jabeur at the Australian Open to escort a butterfly that had landed on her leg safely to the sidelines.

After a fan called out to inform Osaka of her fluttering companion, she dropped what she was doing -- i.e. playing a highly competitive match against one of the other top-ranked Tennis players in the world -- and gently scooped up the butterfly to carry it out of harm's way. But the butterfly wasn't done with it's new friend, flying up to give her some literal butterfly kisses on the nose and cheek.

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Culture Feature

Jared Kushner Could Win a Nobel Prize, but BLM Deserves It

The Nobel Prize committee has the chance to signal a better future for a prize with a fraught past.

I have almost reached the regrettable conclusion that the Negro's great stumbling block in his stride toward freedom is not the White Citizen's Counciler or the Ku Klux Klanner, but the white moderate, who is more devoted to "order" than to justice; who prefers a negative peace which is the absence of tension to a positive peace which is the presence of justice — Dr. Marin Luther King Jr. "Letter From Birmingham Jail" 1963

Nominations have been announced for the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize.

Among notable nominees are Ivanka Trump's husband Jared Kushner, politician and voting rights activist Stacey Abrams, and the Black Lives Matter movement. Depending on your political biases, you likely find at least one of those nominations offensive, though it should be noted that the list of nominees is long, and anyone can be nominated.

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Still from "Loving" (2016)

As protests continue to rage throughout the nation and the world in the wake of the brutal police murder of George Floyd and in the final days of Trump's administration, more and more individuals are seeking out material to help them unlearn centuries of inherited racism.

If you're a white person, you're racist, whether you know it or not. As America finally begins to wake up to the reality of the plight of Black people, it's your job to educate yourself. While there are plenty of resources available to help you in your journey to becoming consistently anti-racist, one of the most powerful ways to learn is by taking in Black stories on film.

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TV News

Spoken Word Poet Brandon Leake Just Won "America's Got Talent"—Does America Love Poetry?

Brandon Leake is a powerful ambassador for an art form that has never had such a mainstream platform

When you think of poetry, what comes to mind?

Maybe it's Robert Frost making trivial choices sound important, or Emily Dickinson giving voice to alienation, or Edgar Allan Poe writing his creepy love to his so-much-younger cousin/wife.

Generally speaking—to the extent we think about poetry at all—Americans tend to think of it as something a handful of dead people did in order to make our high school English classes slightly more dull and confusing. But there is another strain of poetry that doesn't feel so buried in the past–a form that was pioneered by people who are still alive and that's still thriving.

Golden Buzzer: Brandon Leake Makes AGT History With Powerful Poetry - America's Got Talent 2020 www.youtube.com

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CULTURE

NBA Players Are Doing More for Racial Equity Than Congress

In regards to the Black Lives Matter movement and achieving racial equality, athletes are a leading voice, especially for America's youth.

An empty court where the NBA playoffs were set to continue on Wednesday night in the Orlando bubble

Getty Images

The shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin on Sunday reignited the embers still burning from the death of George Floyd just three months ago.

Once again, athletes have joined activist groups calling for justice and reform to prevent these types of occurrences from being so common in our society. On Wednesday, NBA teams started a movement that extended to other sports (including the NFL, MLB, and WNBA), all cancelling games and practices in light of the incident that has left Jacob Blake paralyzed from one of seven bullets fired into his back by a Wisconsin police officer from point blank range, one of them severing his spinal cord.

The Milwaukee Bucks were the first team to announce that they would not participate in their playoff game on Wednesday. The team addressed the media with a unified statement explaining how and why they came to their decision. George Hill and Sterling Brown acted as spokespeople for the organization, and shortly after the league made the decision to postpone all games on the schedule for that day.

Hill stated, "Over the last few days in our home state of Wisconsin, we've seen the horrendous video of Jacob Blake being shot in the back seven times by a police officer in Kenosha, and the additional shooting of protestors. Despite the overwhelming plea for change, there has been no action, so our focus today cannot be on basketball."

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