Fred the Godson (born Fredrick Thomas), a beloved south Bronx rapper, has died at age 35 from COVID-19 complications.

As recently as Wednesday, The Source reported that Thomas was in intensive care and had experienced a fever has high as 105 degrees. Despite this, his heart and vital signs were supposedly showing improvement, though his kidney function was severely impacted by the virus. The MC had a history of asthma that put him at high risk of severe coronavirus.

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Everyone who knew Cameron Boyce during his life described him as unfailingly kind.

The actor died unexpectedly on July 6th 2019 after suffering a seizure in his sleep. Since then, co-stars, friends, and fans alike have been grieving his loss.

At just nine years old, Boyce made his acting debut in a Panic! at the Disco music video. He soon became a household name among a certain age group thanks to his role in Jessie, a Disney Channel show that ran from 2011 to 2015. His movie credits include Mirrors, Eagle Eye with Shia LaBeouf and Grown Ups and Grown Ups 2 with Adam Sandler.

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New Releases

Nicki Minaj's New Song Is a "Yikes" Indeed

The rapper's first song since announcing her hiatus falls flat.

Remember last year when Nicki Minaj said she was retiring to "have her family," and how nobody thought her time off would last?

Well, we were right. After a three-month hiatus from social media, Minaj has returned with her first new single of the year, "Yikes." She teased the track on Instagram a few days ago, and received an onslaught of backlash over a certain disconcerting line: "All you b-----s Rosa Parks, uh-oh, get your ass up." Yikes, indeed!

TMZ reports that Anita Peek, executive director of the Rosa & Raymond Parks Institute, said the bus boycotter would be "extremely hurt" by the lyric if she were alive today to hear it. Fans were displeased, too, especially since the clip of the track first surfaced on Parks' birthday.

Controversy aside, "Yikes" is Minaj at her least compelling. With the exception of a feisty spoken introduction, her delivery is devoid of emotion. "Yikes, I play tag and you it for life / Yikes, you a clown, you do it for likes," she utters blandly in the chorus, over a minimalistic beat that could belong to any rapper. "Yikes" feels anonymous and tedious; it only affirms that the versatility of her Pink Friday days has run dry. It's time for Minaj to pass the torch.

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