Music Lists

Doja Cat's 10 Best Lyrics

Doja's wordplay game is unparalleled.

Doja Cat's Spotify Profile Pic

You might know her from her viral "Moooo" music video about being a cow, but Doja Cat has a strong catalogue of catchy songs.

With her two smash hits "Say So" and "Juicy" rising up in the charts, Doja Cat is here to stay. With witty word play and cutting commentary, here are the top ten Doja Cat verses that are just straight fire.

10. "Cookie Jar"

Doja Cat holding her treat

He call me Oreo, break it and lick the flavor off,

It's my modern life, make me wanna find some Rocko nig

F*ck talkin', she record that, Pokémon Go, you Snorlax

You won't get these sweets again, like Violet, you childish

These explicit verses from Doja Cat's song about being a snack reference four bomb things: the classic Oreo cookie, the iconic 90's cartoon "Rocko's Modern Life," the addictive Pokemon app, and Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. We can't help but stan, since she gave homage to the pillars of pop culture and our 90s childhood.

9. "Rules"

Doja Cat bringing some snake action in her "Rules" music video

Wanna shake that ass

I'ma do this sh*t in slow motion

Look at me like I'm alien

B*itch, I'm f*cking reptilian

You have to love that Doja Cat references Mystikal's "Shake Ya Ass" and Juvenile's "Slow Motion" from the golden era of the early 2000s. But what impresses most in this song is Doja throwing some conspiracy bars. Apparently, celebs, high ranking politicians, and world leaders are actually from an alien reptilian race that are able to shape-shift and control the world. Haven't you seen Justin Bieber's "reptilian" video?

8. "Moo"

Classic Doja Cat snapshot of her 2018 viral "Moo" music video

Milkshake brings all the boys to the farm

And they're like, it's better than yours

Damn right, it's better than yours

I can treat you, but I have to charge

It's not just the fact that Doja references Kelis' fire song "Milkshake," but a milkshake is also...wait for it...dairy. It just fits so seamlessly.

7. "No Police"

Doja Cat's cover art for her 2014 debut album

Like, all these bars, no police

Whee-ooh whee-ooh, whee-ooh whee-ooh

He calls me copper tone

Smoking ultraviolet

We turn off the phone

I'm in autopilot

Make that disappear

Mr. Copperfield

As Doja Cat makes clear in her songs, she also likes to smoke weed so it makes sense she talks about smoking ultraviolet and just vibing in "autopilot". the fact that she references renowned magician/illusionist David Copperfield in a song about bars but no police (meaning her verses) is a nice touch considering Copperfield has done plenty of illusions and tricks with chains/shackles. Doja has a talent for referencing popular figures way past her time (she's only 24!).

6. "Streets"

Doja Cat looking like a queen in her Vevo Live session of "Streets"

When other chickens tryna get in my coop

'Cause you're a one in a million, there ain't no man like you

Send your location, come through

Another pop culture reference to the late singer Aaliyah. One of her hits was a song titled "One in a Million" (which is also the title of her sophomore album) which discussed the topic of love and commitment. The line about the chickens and coop is hilarious since Doja is comparing her love interest to a rooster -- there's no room for other chickens or ladies. Of course, the line about sending the location is a throwback to R&B/pop singer Khalid's "Location."

5. "All Nighter"

Doja Cat feelin' herself in this edgy, denim look

Practice, knee-deep in your tactic

Back it up, beep beep, no U-Haul

Tossed salad, no cheese, no croutons

Said it don't taste cheap, no coupon

Doja has plenty of dirty lyrics and this one just walks the line of extremely explicit and hilarious. From the "Beep Beep" line as she backs it up (with no U-Haul) for her partner, to the notion of a tossed salad. Basically, Doja Cat wants y'all to know she's high quality and delicious if you catch my drift.

4. "Addiction"

"Addiction" is from Doja Cat's newest album "Hot Pink"

We could get that white girl lit like Madonna

Bitch, I ain't Gwen but this shit is bananas

It's only right that Doja Cat references the Queen of Pop herself Madonna when she's talking about getting white girl wasted. Madonna did release a song titled "Bitch I'm Madonna" where she's just dancing and partying all night with every celeb— even Beyonce! The line about shit getting crazy calls for that flawless Gwen Stefani feature. I think we can all agree that "Hollaback Girl" helped us all spell bananas.

3. "Tia Tamera" Ft. Rico Nasty

Doja Cat and Rico Nasty having fun in the "Tia Tamera" music video

Cheese like pizzeria, have a seat bitch, please, Ikea

From the Westside like Maria, I'm hot like grits, Madea

Beat the pussy up call PETA, I rock the boat like Aaliyah

West Side Story, IKEA, Tyler Perry's iconic Madea character, and singer Aaliyah are an odd combo but the rhyme is priceless and pretty accurate considering Doja Cat is making bank, from the west side (born and raised in LA), and up and coming or "hot" now. She's "rocked the boat" with minor controversies and even gets a little political with PETA. It's a nice touch since Doja loves and has cats in real life. Not to mention, the song title is a reference to celeb twins Tia and Tamera Mowry and, according to Doja, her big boobs. Only Doja Cat can sing about her assets in such memorable fashion.

2. "Cyber Sex"

Doja Cat petting her kitty in her "Cyber Sex" music video

We freak on the cam

Love at first sight, just a link to the 'Gram

Met him on Tinder, he just swiped left on bitches

And he don't even scroll through Insta

'Less he going through my pictures

You a creep, I saw you on Dateline

You ain't gettin pussy, you fucking a A.I

Huh-oh, what a time to be alive

Living in the future, blinging on my hotline

This Doja Cat song about sexting is truly underrated. In this day and age, technology is vital to a healthy dating life. The lines talking about Instagram, Tinder, and freaking on camera is on point considering that we all send pics (not to mention the high probability you'll get nudes pretty quickly once you match online). Talking about creeps like the ones on Dateline news and the whole A.I. argument is straight fire. The Drake "hotline bling" reference in regards to Doja's line going off in this digital age is just *chef's kiss*. Not to mention, she includes Facetime in her song when she talks about head. I mean, it's a banger all around, no pun intended.

1. "Juicy"

Doja Cat and all her juicy fruits

He beg for that, I bend and snap

She keep it juicy just for papi, call me Buffy with the body

I just slipped into my savage and come over like a walkie

Like her song about her boobs, "Juicy" discusses Doja's other assets—her ass. What is there not to love? Doja sings about Legally Blonde with her bend and snap line which we all know is a tactic to get a guy's attention. If that's not enough nostalgia, Doja brings up Buffy the Vampire Slayer cause Doja is slayin' with her curvy body that she keeps thick or "juicy" for her man. But the Crème de la crème is the fact that Doja Cat slips into Rihanna's Savage x Fenty lingerie to come over to his place like a "walkie." What do we say when we talk on a walkie? We say "over."

Needless to say, you should be proud to stan a quirky, confident, and talented queen like Amala Zandile Dlamini—the one and only Doja Cat.

Doja Cat showing off her ASS-ets flawlessly

Culture Feature

Drew Brees Exemplifies How NOT to Be a White Ally

The quarterback said "I will never agree with anybody disrespecting the flag of the United States of America or our country." And then he tried to apologize. And only made it worse.

Drew Brees, a man who makes literally millions of dollars for throwing a ball, has come under fire for insensitive comments he made about NFL players kneeling during the National Anthem to protest police brutality.

"I will never agree with anybody disrespecting the flag of the United States of America or our country," Brees said in the interview with Yahoo Finance. He clarified that this was in part because he envisioned his grandfathers, who fought in World War II, during the National Anthem. He continued, saying, "And is everything right with our country right now? No. It's not. We still have a long way to go. But I think what you do by standing there and showing respect to the flag with your hand over your heart, is it shows unity. It shows that we are all in this together. We can all do better. And that we are all part of the solution."

This isn't the first time Brees made it clear that he cares more for the idea of a make-believe unified America than he does for actual human lives. In 2016, he criticized Colin Kaepernick for kneeling during the anthem, saying it was "disrespectful to the American flag" and "an oxymoron" because the flag gave critics the right to speak out in the first place.


Colin Kaepernick Kneeling Colin Kaepernick kneeling in protest of racist police brutality


Of course, the flag's alleged ideals have been proven to only be applicable to wealthy, white men—men like Brees. Sure, his grandfathers did a noble thing when they fought under the US flag during WWII, and no one, including Kaepernick, has ever said that sacrifice isn't worth respecting. Thanks to the sacrifices of many people (including the enslaved Black backs upon which this country was built, including the scores of routinely abused Black soldiers who fought for American lives), America has offered opportunity and peace for many, many people. In particular, Ole' Glory has been very kind to men like Brees: rich, white men who still control the majority of the power and the wealth in the United States.

But what about the rest of us, Drew? What about George Floyd whose neck was crushed by a police officer who kneeled on him so casually that he didn't even take his hand out of his pocket? What about Ahmaud Arbery, who was shot for the crime of being Black and going for a jog? What about Breonna Taylor, a black woman who was murdered by police in her home in the middle of the night for a crime that had nothing to do with her? What about Tony McDade, Drew–have you heard his name? Have you heard about the 38-year-old Black trans man who was gunned down in Florida last week? Do you understand why these people's family's may harbor just a bit of disrespect for your precious flag?

Is it possible for you to realize, Drew, that your wish for "unity" is not a wish for progress, but a wish to maintain the status quo? When you call for unity under the American flag, you're talking about your flag, the flag that represents a long, sordid history of racial oppression and violence. There is no unity where there is no justice. When you say that "we are all in this together," what you're saying is that we all have roles to play in the version of society that has served you so well. For your part, you'll be a rich, white man, and for Black people's part, they'll continue to be victims of state-sanctioned murders– but hopefully more quietly, hopefully in a manner that doesn't make you uncomfortable?

When you say, "We can all do better. And that we are all part of the solution," what you mean to say is that POC and their allies are at fault. Sure, you probably agree that Derek Chauvin took it a bit too far, and you probably feel a little self-conscious that he's brought all this "Black rights" stuff up again. But when you say "all," you place blame on the victims who are dying under a broken system. And what, exactly, do you expect POC to do differently, Drew? Ahmaud Arbery was just out jogging, and still he died. George Floyd was just trying to pay a cashier, and still he died. POC and their allies try to peacefully protest by marching in the streets or taking a knee at a football game, and still white people condemn and criticize. Still the police shoot.

After much criticism, Brees did attempt an apology on Instagram, where he posted a hilariously corny stock photo of a Black and white hand clasped together. His caption, though possibly well-intentioned, made it even clearer that his understanding of the movement for Black lives is thoroughly lacking.


Highlights of the "apology" include his immediate attempt to exonerate himself from culpability, claiming that his words were misconstrued, saying of his previous statement: "Those words have become divisive and hurtful and have misled people into believing that somehow I am an enemy. This could not be further from the truth, and is not an accurate reflection of my heart or my character." Unfortunately, Drew, white people like you are the "enemy," as you put it, because by default you are at the very least part of the problem. No one is accusing you of being an overt racist, Drew; no one thinks you actively and consciously detest Black people. But your lack of empathy, your apathy, and your unwillingness to unlearn your own biases are precisely what has persisted in the hearts and minds of well-meaning white Americans for centuries.

Next, you say, "I recognize that I am part of the solution and can be a leader for the Black community in this movement." No, Drew. Just no. Black people don't need white people's savior complexes to interfere in their organizing; what they need is for us to shut up and listen. What they need is for us to get our knees off of their necks.

Finally, you say, "I have ALWAYS been an ally, never an enemy." This, Drew, is suspiciously similar to saying, "But I'm one of the good whites!" The fact of the matter is that feeling the need to prove your allyship is not about helping a movement; it's about feeding your own ego. Not only that, but your emphasis on "ALWAYS" does a pretty good job of making it clear that you don't think you have a racist bone in your body and that you have taken great offense at any accusations to the contrary. I have some news for you, Drew: Every white person is racist. Sure, the levels vary, and while you may not be actively and consciously discriminating against POC, you have been brought up in a racist system, and your implicit biases are as strong as any other white person's. Your job now is to unlearn those biases and confront those subtle prejudices in yourself and in other white people. Maybe the first step in doing so is just shutting your f*cking mouth about kneeling at football games. Maybe you should even consider taking a knee yourself.

For other non-BIPOC trying to be better allies, check out one of these 68+ anti-racism resources.

New Releases

Rico Nasty Doesn't Care If You Don't Like Her

The rapper's new single is a futuristic f*ck you.

Rico Nasty is on top of a car, and rays of light are radiating from the vehicle.

That's just one of the futuristic visuals in Rico Nasty's flashy, strobe-lit new video for "Lightning," her latest single. Directed by Robert Henry, Nate P, and Anthony Brown, the video shows the rising star relishing her newfound fame. It's jarring and hard-hitting, and it takes no prisoners. "When I was growing up you know I was the weird kid," she raps. "They say they don't like me." But of course, success trumps all that. "Bank account look frightening," she adds, eyes flickering like a cyborg's; clearly she's reached some higher form of evolution.

Originally from Washington, D.C., Rico Nasty released her first mixtape in the eleventh grade. Since then she's released six mixtapes over the years, creating buzz and a dedicated fanbase. A series of high profile collaborations followed—such as the Kenny Beats collab, Anger Management, and a joint effort with 100 gecs—and her first LP is forthcoming.

Rico Nasty - Lightning [Official Video] youtu.be


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