Music Lists

Doja Cat's 10 Best Lyrics

Doja's wordplay game is unparalleled.

Doja Cat's Spotify Profile Pic

You might know her from her viral "Moooo" music video about being a cow, but Doja Cat has a strong catalogue of catchy songs.

With her two smash hits "Say So" and "Juicy" rising up in the charts, Doja Cat is here to stay. With witty word play and cutting commentary, here are the top ten Doja Cat verses that are just straight fire.

10. "Cookie Jar"

Doja Cat holding her treat

He call me Oreo, break it and lick the flavor off,

It's my modern life, make me wanna find some Rocko nig

F*ck talkin', she record that, Pokémon Go, you Snorlax

You won't get these sweets again, like Violet, you childish

These explicit verses from Doja Cat's song about being a snack reference four bomb things: the classic Oreo cookie, the iconic 90's cartoon "Rocko's Modern Life," the addictive Pokemon app, and Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. We can't help but stan, since she gave homage to the pillars of pop culture and our 90s childhood.

9. "Rules"

Doja Cat bringing some snake action in her "Rules" music video

Wanna shake that ass

I'ma do this sh*t in slow motion

Look at me like I'm alien

B*itch, I'm f*cking reptilian

You have to love that Doja Cat references Mystikal's "Shake Ya Ass" and Juvenile's "Slow Motion" from the golden era of the early 2000s. But what impresses most in this song is Doja throwing some conspiracy bars. Apparently, celebs, high ranking politicians, and world leaders are actually from an alien reptilian race that are able to shape-shift and control the world. Haven't you seen Justin Bieber's "reptilian" video?

8. "Moo"

Classic Doja Cat snapshot of her 2018 viral "Moo" music video

Milkshake brings all the boys to the farm

And they're like, it's better than yours

Damn right, it's better than yours

I can treat you, but I have to charge

It's not just the fact that Doja references Kelis' fire song "Milkshake," but a milkshake is also...wait for it...dairy. It just fits so seamlessly.

7. "No Police"

Doja Cat's cover art for her 2014 debut album

Like, all these bars, no police

Whee-ooh whee-ooh, whee-ooh whee-ooh

He calls me copper tone

Smoking ultraviolet

We turn off the phone

I'm in autopilot

Make that disappear

Mr. Copperfield

As Doja Cat makes clear in her songs, she also likes to smoke weed so it makes sense she talks about smoking ultraviolet and just vibing in "autopilot". the fact that she references renowned magician/illusionist David Copperfield in a song about bars but no police (meaning her verses) is a nice touch considering Copperfield has done plenty of illusions and tricks with chains/shackles. Doja has a talent for referencing popular figures way past her time (she's only 24!).

6. "Streets"

Doja Cat looking like a queen in her Vevo Live session of "Streets"

When other chickens tryna get in my coop

'Cause you're a one in a million, there ain't no man like you

Send your location, come through

Another pop culture reference to the late singer Aaliyah. One of her hits was a song titled "One in a Million" (which is also the title of her sophomore album) which discussed the topic of love and commitment. The line about the chickens and coop is hilarious since Doja is comparing her love interest to a rooster -- there's no room for other chickens or ladies. Of course, the line about sending the location is a throwback to R&B/pop singer Khalid's "Location."

5. "All Nighter"

Doja Cat feelin' herself in this edgy, denim look

Practice, knee-deep in your tactic

Back it up, beep beep, no U-Haul

Tossed salad, no cheese, no croutons

Said it don't taste cheap, no coupon

Doja has plenty of dirty lyrics and this one just walks the line of extremely explicit and hilarious. From the "Beep Beep" line as she backs it up (with no U-Haul) for her partner, to the notion of a tossed salad. Basically, Doja Cat wants y'all to know she's high quality and delicious if you catch my drift.

4. "Addiction"

"Addiction" is from Doja Cat's newest album "Hot Pink"

We could get that white girl lit like Madonna

Bitch, I ain't Gwen but this shit is bananas

It's only right that Doja Cat references the Queen of Pop herself Madonna when she's talking about getting white girl wasted. Madonna did release a song titled "Bitch I'm Madonna" where she's just dancing and partying all night with every celeb— even Beyonce! The line about shit getting crazy calls for that flawless Gwen Stefani feature. I think we can all agree that "Hollaback Girl" helped us all spell bananas.

3. "Tia Tamera" Ft. Rico Nasty

Doja Cat and Rico Nasty having fun in the "Tia Tamera" music video

Cheese like pizzeria, have a seat bitch, please, Ikea

From the Westside like Maria, I'm hot like grits, Madea

Beat the pussy up call PETA, I rock the boat like Aaliyah

West Side Story, IKEA, Tyler Perry's iconic Madea character, and singer Aaliyah are an odd combo but the rhyme is priceless and pretty accurate considering Doja Cat is making bank, from the west side (born and raised in LA), and up and coming or "hot" now. She's "rocked the boat" with minor controversies and even gets a little political with PETA. It's a nice touch since Doja loves and has cats in real life. Not to mention, the song title is a reference to celeb twins Tia and Tamera Mowry and, according to Doja, her big boobs. Only Doja Cat can sing about her assets in such memorable fashion.

2. "Cyber Sex"

Doja Cat petting her kitty in her "Cyber Sex" music video

We freak on the cam

Love at first sight, just a link to the 'Gram

Met him on Tinder, he just swiped left on bitches

And he don't even scroll through Insta

'Less he going through my pictures

You a creep, I saw you on Dateline

You ain't gettin pussy, you f*cking a A.I

Huh-oh, what a time to be alive

Living in the future, blinging on my hotline

This Doja Cat song about sexting is truly underrated. In this day and age, technology is vital to a healthy dating life. The lines talking about Instagram, Tinder, and freaking on camera is on point considering that we all send pics (not to mention the high probability you'll get nudes pretty quickly once you match online). Talking about creeps like the ones on Dateline news and the whole A.I. argument is straight fire. The Drake "hotline bling" reference in regards to Doja's line going off in this digital age is just *chef's kiss*. Not to mention, she includes Facetime in her song when she talks about head. I mean, it's a banger all around, no pun intended.

1. "Juicy"

Doja Cat and all her juicy fruits

He beg for that, I bend and snap

She keep it juicy just for papi, call me Buffy with the body

I just slipped into my savage and come over like a walkie

Like her song about her boobs, "Juicy" discusses Doja's other assets—her ass. What is there not to love? Doja sings about Legally Blonde with her bend and snap line which we all know is a tactic to get a guy's attention. If that's not enough nostalgia, Doja brings up Buffy the Vampire Slayer cause Doja is slayin' with her curvy body that she keeps thick or "juicy" for her man. But the Crème de la crème is the fact that Doja Cat slips into Rihanna's Savage x Fenty lingerie to come over to his place like a "walkie." What do we say when we talk on a walkie? We say "over."

Needless to say, you should be proud to stan a quirky, confident, and talented queen like Amala Zandile Dlamini—the one and only Doja Cat.

Doja Cat showing off her ASS-ets flawlessly

New Releases

Rico Nasty Doesn't Care If You Don't Like Her

The rapper's new single is a futuristic f*ck you.

Rico Nasty is on top of a car, and rays of light are radiating from the vehicle.

That's just one of the futuristic visuals in Rico Nasty's flashy, strobe-lit new video for "Lightning," her latest single. Directed by Robert Henry, Nate P, and Anthony Brown, the video shows the rising star relishing her newfound fame. It's jarring and hard-hitting, and it takes no prisoners. "When I was growing up you know I was the weird kid," she raps. "They say they don't like me." But of course, success trumps all that. "Bank account look frightening," she adds, eyes flickering like a cyborg's; clearly she's reached some higher form of evolution.

Originally from Washington, D.C., Rico Nasty released her first mixtape in the eleventh grade. Since then she's released six mixtapes over the years, creating buzz and a dedicated fanbase. A series of high profile collaborations followed—such as the Kenny Beats collab, Anger Management, and a joint effort with 100 gecs—and her first LP is forthcoming.

Rico Nasty - Lightning [Official Video] youtu.be


Follow Rico Nasty : Website | instagram | twitter | facebook | youtube.

MUSIC

100 gecs' "Ringtone" Gets a Remix With Charli XCX, Rico Nasty, and Kero Kero Bonito

Everyone's favorite experimental pop duo bring in some friends for an ultimate dream team.

Since the release of their debut album, 1000 gecs, last May, 100 gecs have become one of the most fascinating phenomenons in recent music.

The experimental duo have been adored by fans for their crunchy, maximalist bangers, which call to mind mid-aughts MySpace trends as much as noise-pop of bands like Sleigh Bells and the bubblegum electronica made famous by London's polarizing PC Music collective. Love them or hate them, 100 gecs—comprised of Dylan Brady and Laura Les—are a dominant force to be reckoned with, backed by beloved rap group BROCKHAMPTON as well as our futuristic pop princess, Charli XCX. The latter has jumped on a remix of the gecs' euphoric "Ringtone," along with Rico Nasty and British electropop band Kero Kero Bonito. This isn't the first time 100 gecs have collaborated with Charli—Brady has already remixed her Lizzo-featuring single "Blame It On Your Love"—but with the addition of Rico and Kero Kero Bonito's Sarah Bonito, "Ringtone" brings together a true dream team.

Charli leads this version of the track, reciting each of the choruses in a delightfully AutoTuned delivery. "When he calls me, I go crazy / Call me with my friends, it doesn't phase me," she sings in the first verse. "Windows down, ridin' in the SUV / And I'm spillin' champagne all on my screen, screamin'." Rico comes in later with her instantly-identifiable snarl: "I think I might be addicted to your kisses / Lovestruck, baby, you're the piece I'm missin'." Although the song is generally ecstatic, Bonito's contributions provide a darker undertone. "Throw away my phone, hide it somewhere no one knows / Buried it in the ground, so it can never be found," she croons near the track's end. "But I still hear it, I hear the sound of your ringtone / It's a crime, why can't I get you outta my mind?"

Whether this titular ringtone is something to celebrate or a painful memory of bygone romances, this group effort of "Ringtone" proves 100 gecs' capability of bringing pop's outliers together.

www.youtube.com

Follow 100 gecs Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

MUSIC

The Top 10 Most Influential Albums of the 2010s

These albums not only shaped the past decade: they'll determine what music will be in the coming one.

Music has never been extricable from culture, but in the 2010s, it became crystal clear that music has the ability to shatter norms and reshape the world.

Take a moment and think back to the albums that changed your life over the past decade. Most likely, they altered your worldview on a fundamental level, reshaping the way you saw yourself and your life. Some albums are capable of doing that on a massive scale, and that's what this list is intended to highlight: Albums that managed to shift the way people saw music, culture, and themselves, and that paved the way for what music might become.

10. Kendrick Lamar — To Pimp A Butterfly

Kendrick Lamar - Alright www.youtube.com

Poet and firebrand Kendrick Lamar creates music that's both timeless and entirely of its time. To Pimp A Butterfly was Kendrick at his most inspired and radioactive. It cut into the pain and rage and hope of an era and a community and a person, and collapsed time into a tangle of sound and memory that reviewers and listeners will be playing and attempting to understand for decades.

It made an indelible impact, becoming a juggernaut and an easy name-drop, but fortunately, To Pimp A Butterfly searingly addresses all the trappings of fame, shallow understanding, and commodification that follow it, retaining an indomitable inner life.

9. BTS — Map of the Soul: Persona

BTS (방탄소년단) MAP OF THE SOUL : PERSONA 'Persona' Comeback Trailer www.youtube.com

The 2010s were the era that K-pop entered the global theatre, and nobody dominated more than BTS. Their album Map of the Soul: Persona may not have been critically lauded, but it was legendary in the hearts and minds of their fans.

Map of the Soul: Persona was glittery boy-band pop, pristine and starry-eyed. Rolling Stone described it as "harmless" and "impregnable," but BTS fans are not harmless, and neither is K-pop, but what this band is is unavoidable, pervasive, and larger-than-life. To ignore the impact of BTS would be to miss a massive portion of the 2010s and to remain blind to what the 2020s will hold, which is a far more globalized music industry that, no matter what, will always, always have its beloved boy bands.

8. Carly Rae Jepsen — E•MO•TION

Carly Rae Jepsen - Run Away With Me www.youtube.com

Jepsen's seminal debut album gained her a cult of devoted fans and spread a wide-eyed sense of pop optimism across the 2010s. Just what about E•MO•TION was so singular, so moving, so unforgettable? As Jia Tolentino wrote, "Carly Rae Jepsen is a pop artist zeroed in on love's totipotency: the glance, the kaleidoscope-confetti-spinning instant, the first bit of nothing that contains it all." As one Twitter user insinuated, "Carly Rae Jepsen's E•MO•TION is for all the gays in a healthy relationship for the first time."

Electric Lit argued that with E•MO•TION, Jepsen ushered in a "queer renaissance," one that exists because her music occupies a familiar feeling: "the struggle to express a desire that isn't supposed to exist." From the raw ecstasy of "Run Away With Me" to the dreamy chaos of "LA Hallucinations," Jepsen's music is desperate to bridge the gap between the self and others, to leave behind loneliness, to cut straight to the feeling; and in that, it left an indelible impact for those who were there to experience its majesty.

7. Lana Del Rey — Born To Die

Lana Del Rey - Born To Die (Official Music Video) www.youtube.com

Lana Del Rey is, rightfully, credited with ushering in the wave of sad-girl pop that is still going strong, thanks to artists like Halsey, Billie Eilish, and of course, Del Rey herself. The artist formerly known as Lizzy Grant emerged onto the scene as a cyborgian, hyper-manufactured industry plant refracted through a vintage DIY filter, and now she's one of the voices of her generation, whispering platitudes on America and sex and sadness in the same breath.

Born To Die was Del Rey at her most manufactured, her most glittery, her must luxurious and opulent and depressed, and it's beautiful in its decay. Its kitschy Americana held no bars, and from its nihilistic title track to the sultry "Blue Jeans" to the weird glamour of "Off To the Races," it effectively spawned an entire generation of flower-crowned teens who are now sad Trump-hating adults.

6. Lady Gaga — Born This Way

Lady Gaga - Born This Way www.youtube.com

Lady Gaga might not have the clout she did at the beginning of the 2010s, but back in the day, Gaga was a wild card and game-changer, crushing norms, changing fashion, and standing up for the LGBTQ+ community. She was proudly weird and always daring, and she created a whole space for weird pop stars after her. She blended drag, burlesque, and shock-factor performance with genuinely catchy pop, and created a new blueprint for stardom in the process.

Born This Way was arguably her crown jewel, the point where she blossomed into the true freak she'd been waiting to become. It had the ecstatic "You and I" and "Edge of Glory." It marked an era where pop music became inextricable from its visual component and political implications—not that it ever really was.

5. Lizzo — Cuz I Love You

Lizzo - Truth Hurts (Official Video) www.youtube.com

Most likely, Lizzo will be even bigger in the 2020s; after all, she only just released her major label debut album. But Lizzo has already changed the game, creating space for a type of beauty and confidence that pop stars before her have only played at or insinuated. From her refusal to tolerate inadequate men to her willingness to rock thongs at baseball games and her decision to pay tribute to the great women who paved the way for her, at this point, Lizzo might be our best hope for the future.

Cuz I Love You synthesized the hits Lizzo had been building up for years, twining them into a euphoric testament to self-love in spite of a world that teaches you to hate yourself. From the celebratory "Good As Hell" to the buoyant mic-drop that is "Truth Hurts," the album is a gift to us all.

4. Lil Nas X — 7 (EP)

Lil Nas X - Old Town Road (Official Movie) ft. Billy Ray Cyrus www.youtube.com

Lil Nas X's fantastic "Old Town Road" was the perfect conflagration of factors that hit at exactly the right time. It was also supremely, unbelievably catchy. Using memes, blurring genres, buying beats off SoundCloud, coming out on Twitter and being open about how he made "Old Town Road" while sleeping on his sister's couch, Lil Nas caught us all in our heartstrings and created a blueprint for music's undeniably post-genre and multimedia future.

X's EP, "7," wasn't a high-quality work so much as it was a cultural flashpoint, an inspiration that no doubt has marketing executives scrambling to replicate it.

3. Billie Eilish — when we all fall asleep, where do we go?

Billie Eilish - bad guy www.youtube.com

Billie Eilish is changing the game in terms of what pop music can sound like and how pop stars should act. Any producer who attempts to drag pop songs into clear-cut and old-fashioned forms involving high notes and beat drops will find themselves challenged by the innovative, glitchy, challenging tunes that Eilish creates with her brother in their childhood home. Her refusal to fit into gender norms and her insistence on standing up for things like climate make her emblematic of what a future of Gen-Z stars might look like.

when we all fall asleep, where do we go? is a peculiar album. A lot of its songs don't even try for radio play, and some are so sad they can take your breath away. Some are barely whispers, like the moody "when the party's over," while others are cracked and angry and challenging, like the smash hit "bad guy," but all of it's undeniably unforgettable and boundary-breaking.

2. Kanye West — My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy

Kanye West - Runaway (Full-length Film) www.youtube.com

Provocative, raw, and almost bloody with emotion, Kanye West's My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy continues to reverberate nearly 10 years after it was released. West's album is full of unexpected dips into guitar solos and alien sounds that draw it into new dimensions; it's peppered with cheesy lines, dirty jokes, and shockingly confessional lyrics; and no matter how far West has gone into Christianity, My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy is an enduring ode to the devils we all know.

Its best songs, "All Of the Lights," "Devil In A New Dress" and "Runaway," explore what West has always been working through—the ragged edge where sin meets faith, and where success meets corruption. MBDTF sinks its teeth into the rough, infected parts of the world and creates something great out of them. Though we might not see West exploring this territory again, his work sparked an entire generation of artists looking to dive into the world he created.

1. Beyoncé — Lemonade

Beyoncé - Formation www.youtube.com

Beyoncé's brilliant Lemonade has yet to be surpassed, even as other artists try to mirror her surprise video-drop format. Lemonade mixed poetry, visuals, and beautiful, kaleidoscopic music to form a treatise on freedom, love, black women's power, and of course, Jay-Z. It made an indelible impact on all the music that came after it, setting the standard for what a truly creative release could look and sound like.

From the harmony-laden "Pray You Catch Me" to the gritty Jack White duet "Don't Hurt Yourself" to the triumphant, anthemic "Freedom," Lemonade changed everything. We can only hope we'll see more like it in the 2020s.

MUSIC

Rico Nasty Show Us How She Works and Plays "Hard"

It's one of the Maryland rapper's many new singles of the year.

As long as she's been recording music, Rico Nasty has found her success in not caring what others think of her.

On the heels of April's Anger Management mixtape and her cameo in the music video for the world's favorite country-rap crossover hit, "Old Town Road," the Maryland rapper is celebrating her momentum. She's inimitably feisty, relentlessly angry, and most of all, dedicated to the hustle. Or, in her words, she goes "Hard," the title of her latest single.

Rico Nasty - Hard [Official Video] www.youtube.com

In this context, "Hard" describes many things Rico exemplifies in the wake of her accomplishments: her work ethic, her marijuana, her set of wheels, and—ahem—something a little more X-rated. Her unmistakably gravelly voice feels as unrestricted as ever, joyous with pride in her own "started from the bottom, now we're here" prose. "How the f**k did I get rich when I was just poor? / All of these blessings, I'm thankin' the lord," Rico boasts with gratitude, though she knows her fame wasn't a total accident: "I work hard so I get to play hard." Entirely unbothered by the haters, "Hard" sees Rico reveling in a plethora of material acquisitions—designer duds, heavy chains, men who "dig [her] like a graveyard"—but the most rewarding matter is knowing that she got here all by herself.

Follow Rico Nasty Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

MUSIC

The Best Artist Merchandise of 2020

Support your favorite artist in style.

As you probably know, the music industry is going through a period of massive transformation.

Thanks to streaming and internet piracy, artists are no longer making money through record sales. Instead, they have to depend on concert tickets and, of course, merchandise. While that's bad news for your favorite struggling indie band, it's good news for fans, because it means band merch has gotten incredibly cool.