MUSIC

Kim Gordon Knows the "Recipe for a Better Future" in New Bernie Sanders PSA

The Sonic Youth founding member shared a parody cooking video that puts a fun spin on feeling the Bern.

Bernie Sanders and popular musicians pretty much go hand-in-hand at this point.

The senator's events have played host to a growing list of musical artists lately; indie darlings like Soccer Mommy and Lucy Dacus have opened for his rallies, as well as established bands like Vampire Weekend and the Strokes. If they're not sharing the stage with Bernie, musicians are likely otherwise endorsing him: Ariana Grande and Cardi B have both hung out with the presidential hopeful, and countless others have shared their support.

Among the notable names in music who are feeling the Bern is Kim Gordon, a founding member of the band Sonic Youth, who released her first solo record last year. Over the past few months, Gordon's Instagram has become saturated with her Sanders support, and she's not slowing down.

Last night, Gordon shared a video from her kitchen to help Democratic voters who still might be on the fence this Super Tuesday. "Want a recipe for a better future? Watch to find out," she captioned the post. In a clip titled What's Cooking America? With Kim Gordon, the rock legend put "ingredients"—Medicare for All, student debt forgiveness, women's rights, and much more—into a bowl, mixing them together to create a colorful goo. After pouring it into a Pyrex and letting it bake, Gordon whipped out a perfectly-frosted cake with Bernie's name written on top. "Vote for Bernie," Gordon urges at the end, letting you know which states need to get out and vote this Super Tuesday.

If you live in Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, or you're a Democrat abroad, get out and vote!

Watch the video below:

New Releases

Vampire Weekend Share Three "Father of the Bride" Bonus Tracks

The songs, originally available only in Japan, are now streaming worldwide.

Last May, Vampire Weekend returned from a five-year hiatus with their fourth studio album, Father of the Bride.

At 18 tracks and an hour long, it marks the seminal indie band's most expansive release yet—yet there's still more where that came from. Today, Ezra Zoenig and company have shared three additional songs from the Father of the Bride sessions, originally included as bonus tracks from the Japanese release of the album: "Houston Dubai," "I Don't Think Much About Her No More," and "Lord Ullin's Daughter."

"Houston Dubai" is an upbeat acoustic tune that harks back to Vampire Weekend's first releases. "I got a wife back home you know / She always thinks I cheat," Koenig sings. "I think about those dead end days / When life was light and sweet." "I Don't Think About Her Much No More," a hushed Mickey Newbury cover, features echoing background vocals that are reminiscent of Bob Dylan. A surprise cameo comes from Jude Law on "Lord Ullin's Daughter," who reads a 200-year-old Scottish poem over an early piano rendition of FOTB track "Big Blue."

"At first, I wanted to make two 23-song albums on some human chromosome s--t," Koenig explained upon announcing FOTB. "But then 23&me started doing Spotify playlists and I don't know…felt we'd been scooped.⁣"

Maybe we'll get that massive double-album someday, but for now, you can check out the new-to-streaming bonus tracks below.

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2010 was a major time for music.

The year brought landmark records for artists like Kanye West, Kesha, and Vampire Weekend—all of which we've previously discussed at length. But that's only the tip of the iceberg of records that, despite being released a decade ago, still feel timeless in their own ways.

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Soccer Mommy's debut album, Clean, was one of the crown jewels of what might loosely be described as the bedroom indie movement.

Now she's poised to take over mainstream indie rock with her forthcoming sophomore album, color theory.

Stereogum

She accompanied the album release announcement with a new single: a sunny, folky tune called "circle the drain." It's evocative of the broad, folky sensibilities of '70s California rock bands, but it's also a distinctly modern tour through a tangled mind. "Hey I've been falling apart these days / split open, watching my heart go around and around, circling the drain," she sings, a line that could describe the state of modern politics as well as the everyday emotions that accompany being human in such an unstable world.

Despite the open, expansive sound that characterizes the album's existing singles, it sounds like the project—at least lyrically—will be a deep exploration of a fractured psyche, refracted through an artist's perception of the world. color theory will be a three-movement work that "explores three central themes: blue, representing sadness and depression; yellow, symbolizing physical and emotional illness; and, finally, gray, representing darkness, emptiness and loss," according to the New York Times.

Though the new album might be an upgrade from her days of making music on her NYU dorm room floor, Soccer Mommy (whose real name is Sophie Allison) is sticking to her DIY and confessional roots. "I wanted the experience of listening to color theory to feel like finding a dusty old cassette tape that has become messed up over time, because that's what this album is: an expression of all the things that have slowly degraded me personally," she said. "The production warps, the guitar solos occasionally glitch, the melodies can be poppy and deceptively cheerful. To me, it sounds like the music of my childhood distressed and, in some instances, decaying."

In the three existing singles from color theory, Allison explores some of life's paradoxes, lingering in a space somewhere between collapse and peace. "It's a halfhearted calm—the way I've felt since I was 13," said Allison of the songs, in the same interview where she described herself as "the self-proclaimed princess of screwing up."

Though she may see herself that way, Soccer Mommy obviously isn't doing so badly. But the mind can work in strange ways, and hers seems to run in loops self-criticism, apathy, and creative drive. For everyone teetering on the brink between peace and misery, this will resonate beautifully.

Watch the video below:

Soccer Mommy - circle the drain (Official Music Video) www.youtube.com



MUSIC

10 Years of "Contra," the Album that Proved Vampire Weekend Were Here to Stay

A retrospective on the indie legends' second record.

Ezra Koenig was drawn to the cover photo of Contra because of its vagueness and candid nature.

The eyes staring back at you from Vampire Weekend's second record are so striking, so intentional, that it's fair to assume the Polaroid was taken for the sole purpose of the album. But in fact, the photo is older than Koenig himself, one he found by browsing the image hosting service Flickr. "The ambiguity of her age and expression made me feel like she was on the cusp of something, which really matches the vibe of the new album," the band's frontman explained. "Wrapped up in her expression is this question: 'How is she feeling?' Maybe she wasn't even really sure at the time." Though Contra just turned 10 years old, the simple Polo shirt and gold hoops of its cover girl feel ageless, and the album itself remains an enduring touchstone of indie rock that's become a considerable classic itself.

But Vampire Weekend didn't need to make another iconic record. Their 2008 self-titled debut spawned their first certified gold single, "A-Punk," further popularized by soundtracks to films like Step Brothers and video games like Guitar Hero 5. In the expansive realm of art-rock acts to emerge around the same time, Vampire Weekend's blend of afropop and chamber pop wasn't just an act of pandering to the same kids who fawned over bands like Grizzly Bear and Animal Collective; it was a bunch of New York prepsters paving new roads for indie music.

Vampire Weekend - 'Holiday' (official video) www.youtube.com


Though their debut was plenty brave, Contra saw Vampire Weekend introduce a wider pool of influences and exercise new sounds. "California English" utilized an unlikely dash of Auto-Tune, while tracks like "Run" and "White Sky" implemented electronic instrumentation that was previously unheard of from them. The "Miserlou"-approximating guitar trills of "Cousins" are the band at their most chaotic. They sampled British rapper M.I.A. for the bouncy "Diplomat's Son," only to follow it up with the closing "I Think Ur a Contra," a peaceful, heart-wrenching breakup ballad that remains one of Vampire Weekend's most stunning songs to date.

Vampire Weekend - 'Cousins' (Official Music Video) www.youtube.com


Recently, music journalist Evan Rytlewski tweeted a metric he uses to estimate a band's greatness—which he calls the "Strokes test"—that's had my brain rattling for days: "Would people still care about this band if their best album did not exist?" Vampire Weekend were one of the first bands I thought of who'd pass the test with flying colors. They're one of those bands whose "best album" will be hotly debated for years to come; some favor the new-band rootsiness of their self-titled, while others, like myself, tend to lean towards the polished atmosphere of their 2013 masterpiece, Modern Vampires of the City. A minority delight in the sheer amusement of their comeback double album, last year's Father of the Bride.

The only certainty of Contra is that it solidified this gang of Columbia grads as not one-time successes, but as torchbearers of indie rock that'll continue to be idolized and imitated countless times, decades on. Years after "A-Punk" stops autoplaying on our car stereos, Contra serves as indication of a band qualified to stay for both a good time and a long time.

Vampire Weekend - I Think Ur A Contra www.youtube.com

With awards season officially underway, the Oscars have announced their full list of the 2020 nominees.

Joker leads the pack with a grand total of 11 nominations, including Best Picture and Best Actor for Joaquin Phoenix. Three films each earned eight nods: The Irishman, 1917, and Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. Although fans were disappointed to see no Director recognition for Greta Gerwig—or any woman, for that matter—her adaptation of Little Women still racked up six nominations. It was also a big year for South Korean thriller Parasite, which got six nods as well, including for Best Picture, Director, and International Feature.

Below, here's all the nominations for the 92nd Academy Awards.

Motion Picture

Ford v Ferrari (Fox), Peter Chernin, Jenno Topping and James Mangold, Producers

The Irishman (Netflix), Martin Scorsese, Robert De Niro, Jane Rosenthal and Emma Tillinger Koskoff, Producers

Jojo Rabbit (Fox Searchlight), Carthew Neal and Taika Waititi, Producers

Joker (Warner Bros.), Todd Phillips, Bradley Cooper and Emma Tillinger Koskoff, Producers

Little Women (Sony), Amy Pascal, Producer

Marriage Story (Netflix), Noah Baumbach and David Heyman, Producers

1917 (Universal), Sam Mendes, Pippa Harris, Jayne-Ann Tenggren and Callum McDougall, Producers

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood (Sony), David Heyman, Shannon McIntosh and Quentin Tarantino, Producers

Parasite (Neon), Kwak Sin Ae and Bong Joon Ho, Producers

Actress

Cynthia Erivo (Harriet)

Scarlett Johansson (Marriage Story)

Saoirse Ronan (Little Women)

Charlize Theron (Bombshell)

Renée Zellweger (Judy)

Actor

Antonio Banderas (Pain and Glory)

Leonardo DiCaprio (Once Upon a Time in Hollywood)

Adam Driver (Marriage Story)

Joaquin Phoenix (Joker)

Jonathan Pryce (The Two Popes)

Actress in a Supporting Role

Kathy Bates (Richard Jewell)

Laura Dern (Marriage Story)

Scarlett Johansson (Jojo Rabbit)

Florence Pugh (Little Women)

Margot Robbie (Bombshell)

Actor in a Supporting Role

Brad Pitt (Once Upon a Time in Hollywood)

Al Pacino (The Irishman)

Joe Pesci (The Irishman)

Tom Hanks (A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood)

Anthony Hopkins (The Two Popes)

Director

Bong Joon Ho (Parasite)

Sam Mendes (1917)

Todd Phillips (Joker)

Martin Scorsese (The Irishman)

Quentin Tarantino (Once Upon a Time in Hollywood)

Adapted Screenplay

The Irishman (Steven Zaillian)

Jojo Rabbit (Taika Waititi)

Joker (Todd Phillips & Scott Silver)

Little Women (Greta Gerwig)

The Two Popes (Anthony McCarten)

Original Screenplay

1917 (Sam Mendes & Krysty Wilson-Cairns)

Knives Out (Rian Johnson)

Marriage Story (Noah Baumbach)

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood (Quentin Tarantino)

Parasite (Bong Joon Ho & Jin Won Han)

International Feature

Corpus Christi (Poland)

Honeyland (North Macedonia)

Les Misérables (France)

Pain and Glory (Spain)

Parasite (South Korea)

Documentary Feature

American Factory (Netflix), Steven Bognar, Julia Reichert and Jeff Reichert

The Cave (National Geographic), Feras Fayyad, Kirstine Barfod and Sigrid Dyekjaer

The Edge of Democracy (Netflix), Petra Costa, Joanna Natasegara, Shane Boris and Tiago Pavan

For Sama (PBS), Waad al-Kateab and Edward Watts

Honeyland (Neon), Ljubo Stefanov, Tamara Kotevska and Atanas Georgiev

Animated Feature Film

How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World (Dreamworks), Dean DeBlois, Bradford Lewis and Bonnie Arnold

I Lost My Body (Netflix), Jérémy Clapin and Marc du Pontavice

Klaus (Netflix), Sergio Pablos, Jinko Gotoh and Marisa Román

Missing Link (United Artists Releasing), Chris Butler, Arianne Sutner and Travis Knight

Toy Story 4 (Pixar), Josh Cooley, Mark Nielsen and Jonas Rivera

Production Design

The Irishman, Production Design: Bob Shaw; Set Decoration: Regina Graves

Jojo Rabbit, Production Design: Ra Vincent; Set Decoration: Nora Sopková

1917, Production Design: Dennis Gassner; Set Decoration: Lee Sandales

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, Production Design: Barbara Ling; Set Decoration: Nancy Haigh

Parasite, Production Design: Lee Ha Jun; Set Decoration: Cho Won Woo

Film Editing

Ford v Ferrari, Andrew Buckland & Michael McCusker

The Irishman, Thelma Schoonmaker

Jojo Rabbit, Tom Eagles

Joker, Jeff Groth

Parasite, Jinmo Yang

Cinematography

1917 (Roger Deakins)

The Irishman (Rodrigo Prieto)

Joker (Lawrence Sher)

The Lighthouse (Jarin Blaschke)

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood (Robert Richardson)

Visual Effects

1917

Avengers: Endgame

The Irishman

The Lion King

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker

Costume Design

The Irishman, Sandy Powell and Christopher Peterson

Jojo Rabbit, Mayes C. Rubeo

Joker, Mark Bridges

Little Women, Jacqueline Durran

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, Arianne Phillips

Sound Mixing

1917

Ad Astra

Ford v Ferrari

Joker

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood

Sound Editing

1917

Ford v Ferrari

Joker

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker

Original Song

"I Can't Let You Throw Yourself Away, " Toy Story 4, Music and Lyric by Randy Newman

"(I'm Gonna) Love Me Again," Rocketman, Music by Elton John; Lyric by Bernie Taupin

"I'm Standing With You," Breakthrough, Music and Lyric by Diane Warren

"Into The Unknown," Frozen II, Music and Lyric by Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez

"Stand Up," Harriet, Music and Lyric by Joshuah Brian Campbell and Cynthia Erivo

Original Score

Joker, Hildur Gudnadóttir

Little Women, Alexandre Desplat

Marriage Story, Randy Newman

1917, Thomas Newman

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker, John Williams

Makeup and Hairstyling

Bombshell, Kazu Hiro, Anne Morgan and Vivian Baker

Joker, Nicki Ledermann and Kay Georgiou

Judy, Jeremy Woodhead

Maleficent: Mistress of Evil, Paul Gooch, Arjen Tuiten and David White

1917, Naomi Donne, Tristan Versluis and Rebecca Cole

Live Action Short Film

Brotherhood

Nefta Football Club

The Neighbors' Window

Saria

A Sister

Animated Short Film

Dcera (Daughter), Daria Kashcheeva

Hair Love, Matthew A. Cherry and Karen Rupert Toliver

Kitbull, Rosana Sullivan and Kathryn Hendrickson

Memorabl, Bruno Collet and Jean-François Le Corree

Sister, Siqi Song

Documentary Short Subject

In the Absence, Yi Seung-Jun and Gary Byung-Seok Kam

Learning to Skateboard in a Warzone (If You're a Girl), Carol Dysinger and Elena Andreicheva

Life Overtakes Me, John Haptas and Kristine Samuelson

St. Louis Superman, Smriti Mundhra and Sami Khan

Walk Run Cha-Cha, Laura Nix and Colette Sandstedt