CULTURE

6 New Video Games To Play In May 2021

May is set to be the best month for video games so far in 2021

Biomutant

After a handful of solid releases throughout April, things are really heating up this month in the gaming community.

2021 has already seen several critically acclaimed hits such as Hazelight Studios' It Takes Two, but some of the biggest releases of this year happen in May. Games like Grand Casino Tycoon are exactly what they sound like, while strange titles like Very Very Valet, (where you valet cars) are strange, fun, and quirky. Out of all the releases set for May 2021, here are 6 that we're particularly excited about.

Resident Evil Village (May 7)

Resident Evil: Village

Resident Evil: Village

The biggest release set for this month comes right in its first week. Resident Evil Village, the latest survival-horror entry in the longstanding critically-acclaimed series finds RE7's Ethan Winters exploring a culty European village hoping to find his daughter Rose. Winters quickly gets more than he bargained for when he meets the towering Lady Dimitrescu, the games infamous villain who kickstarted an entire porn movement earlier this year. As the first RE game set to be entirely in first-person view, Village aims to be a horror experience unlike any other.

Hood: Outlaws & Legends (May 10)

Hood: Outlaws & Legends

Hood: Outlaws & Legends

Coming just mere days after the release of Resident Evil: Village, the highly anticipated Hood: Outlaws & Legends offers a unique multiplayer premise: form a rag-tag team of thieves and compete against each other to pull off daring heists. With its stealth-based combat, the game is set to be like a nerve-racking, multiplayer Assasins Creed. We'll see if Hood lives up to the hype, but it aims to be one of the most ambitious games of 2021.

Mass Effect: Legendary Edition (May 14)

Mass Effect: Legendary Edition

Mass Effect: Legendary Edition

While there are plenty of new game releases this month, the Legendary Edition re-release of Mass Effect has garnered a good amount of buzz over the last few months. Coming to PC, PS4, and Xbox One, the remake is set to add a slew of new features to the first Mass Effect game, in particular. New and revitalized combat mechanics, and better graphics and more fluid controls are just a few of the tweaks fans can look forward to. The refurbished games will also give series fans something to hold on to while they wait for BioWare's next entry, which is rumored to be in development now.

Knockout City (May 21)

Knockout City

Knockout City

The most hardcore game of dodgeball you will ever play, Knockout City from Velan Studios and Electronic Arts is a quirky team-based multiplayer dodgeball tournament. Players have access to a variety of balls across five different maps, and compete across the sprawling galactic city to be the best crew in town. The reviews so far have been generally positive, so we're excited to see if this quirky multiplayer game really takes off.

Rust (May 21)

Rust

Rust

A popular online multiplayer scavenger game for PC players, a console edition of Rust has been teased for years now. It seems like console owners will finally get their wish, as Rust will finally be released on PS4 and Xbox One on May 21. For those new to the addictive multiplayer game: The goal is pretty much survival, as players scavenge and compete for resources on a sprawling map.

Biomutant (May 25)

Biomutant

Biomutant

Biomutant has remained one of the most anticipated games of 2021, and for good reason. The zany open-world RPG allows players to customize an anthropomorphic pet to their heart's content, and then face off against other strange mutant animals. It seems odd at first, but the game's open world aspects have been compared to The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, which obviously is one hell of a compliment. To say the least, Biomutant should be at the top of everyone's list this year.

The Elder Scrolls Morrowind

Released on this day in 2002, The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind was at the time one of the most expansive RPG's ever created.

Full of quests to complete, dungeons to explore, and people to meet, the characters that exist on the island of Vvardenfell made the game feel alive and lived in. But with so many NPCs needing your help throughout the game, some of Morrowind's best side characters got undoubtedly lost in translation.

Here are a few of the best characters you'll still encounter when exploring the island of Vvardenfell —19 years later.


Tarhiel

Tarhiel

Tarhiel

A character who randomly falls out of the sky to his death, Tariel isn't a character that players will get to meet but will instead happen upon his corpse after he plummets out of the sky. When you inspect his corpse, you learn through his journals that he was working on a spell to help him fly, so he wouldn't have to pay for travel expenses.

Creeper

Creeper

Creeper

A strange, feral scamp living among Orcs, Creeper is surprisingly one of the richest merchants in the game, harboring around 5,000 gold when you first meet him. It's strange that he lives with Orcs. It's stranger that he doesn't attack you and even stranger how wealthy he is. Needless to say, no clarifying answers are given as to who the hell Creeper is, but that's what makes him all the more endearing.

Forstaag the Sweltering

Forstaag The Sweltering

Forstaag The Sweltering

The nearly-nude Nord NPC, found somewhere in the Mournhold plaza, is truly an oddball. The rumor around the plaza is that a witch has stolen his clothes, but the truth of the matter is that Forstaag often just gets hot, so he sheds his garments in order to cool himself.

He's also very insecure about it. "What're you looking at?" he says when you first meet him. "No, I'm not paralyzed, and I've never even met a witch, much less been asked to escort one anywhere. Why am I naked? Because it's too damn hot here!"

Basks-In-The-Sun

Basks-In-The-Sun

Basks-In-The-Sun

The lone Argonian shipmaster waits at the cold docks of Fort Frostmouth in order to help players journey back to Vvardenfell. That's all he does, but if you speak to him, you'll learn that his toes are cold and that he yearns for one thing: a warm set of boots. But upon further reflection, you realize he is an Argonian and that it isn't physically possible for him to wear boots. Bask-In-The-Sun is forever doomed to have cold toesies.

Divayth Fyr

Divayth Fyr

Divayth Fyr

A fan-favorite NPC in the world of Morrowind, this 4,000-year-old Dunmer sorcerer is technically a member of the House Telvanni but usually prefers to stay out of House politics. He lives alongside four women named Alfe, Beyte, Delta, and Uupse, whom he refers to as his "daughters."

We soon find out that they think of themselves more as his wives, which is weird. Then we find out that they're clones, created by Fyr to do his bidding. He also has some of the best equipment at his disposal, and he doesn't even give a sh*t about it. You're free to take his Scourge and Saviour's hide, and he feels indifferent about the full set of Daedric armor that clads his body, which is the best armor set in the game.

Jiub

Jirub

Jirub

The very first character to come into your orbit, Jirub is a hardened Dunmer who wakes you up from your fevered slumber at the beginning of the game. While your encounter with him is brief, his kindness is memorable, as he slowly helps you awaken and figure out who exactly you are. Jiub became an avid obsession for Elder Scroll players. Buff and gruff, but with an apparent soft side, whatever happened to that weird Dunmer?

While you only spend a few moments with Jiub, you come to learn later in Oblivion that he drove all the Cliff-Racers from Vvardenfell, a heroic act that forever canonized him in Elder Scrolls lore, but that he also died in Kvatch after an Oblivion Gate opened there. You also can perform a side quest for his ghost later in Skyrim, but that's another story.

Crassius Curio

Crassius Curio

Crassius Curio

An Imperial Nobleman who dabbles in adult novels, Crassius Curio has an almost nightmarishly unsettling persona. He refers to you as his "dumpling" or his "pudding" and is uncomfortably flirtatious at every interaction. He immediately asks you to strip upon meeting him and demands you call him "Uncle Crassius." "Show Uncle Crassius what you have to offer," he mutters. "Don't be shy." If you do decide to strip down, he will "inspect" you, and then agree to sponsor you so you can join House Hlaalu. It's all a bit disturbing, but whatever gets you the sponsorship, I guess.

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