New Releases

Vampire Weekend Share Three "Father of the Bride" Bonus Tracks

The songs, originally available only in Japan, are now streaming worldwide.

Last May, Vampire Weekend returned from a five-year hiatus with their fourth studio album, Father of the Bride.

At 18 tracks and an hour long, it marks the seminal indie band's most expansive release yet—yet there's still more where that came from. Today, Ezra Zoenig and company have shared three additional songs from the Father of the Bride sessions, originally included as bonus tracks from the Japanese release of the album: "Houston Dubai," "I Don't Think Much About Her No More," and "Lord Ullin's Daughter."

"Houston Dubai" is an upbeat acoustic tune that harks back to Vampire Weekend's first releases. "I got a wife back home you know / She always thinks I cheat," Koenig sings. "I think about those dead end days / When life was light and sweet." "I Don't Think About Her Much No More," a hushed Mickey Newbury cover, features echoing background vocals that are reminiscent of Bob Dylan. A surprise cameo comes from Jude Law on "Lord Ullin's Daughter," who reads a 200-year-old Scottish poem over an early piano rendition of FOTB track "Big Blue."

"At first, I wanted to make two 23-song albums on some human chromosome s--t," Koenig explained upon announcing FOTB. "But then 23&me started doing Spotify playlists and I don't know…felt we'd been scooped.⁣"

Maybe we'll get that massive double-album someday, but for now, you can check out the new-to-streaming bonus tracks below.

youtu.be


youtu.be


youtu.be

Justin Tallis/Getty Images

Dick Pound, a senior member of the International Olympic Committee, delivered a somber announcement in a quavering voice on Tuesday.

Concerned about the potential for the Olympic games to become a disease vector for the spread of the coronavirus, the quavering member of the IOC laid bare a harsh reality that must have felt like a stiff slap in the face to the Japanese Olympic Committee and the city of Tokyo. The outbreak of the coronavirus in Japan must be contained by late May or, according to Dick Pound, the 2020 Summer Olympics—which Tokyo was hotly anticipating—are likely not to come at all.

"In and around that time, I'd say folks are going to have to ask: 'Is this under sufficient control that we can be confident about going to Tokyo or not?'"

Once a champion swimmer for Canada, Dick Pound shed his speedo in the 1960s to insert himself into the business end of the Canadian Olympic Committee. Since then, his prominent membership in Olympic business has included serving as a vice president of the IOC and as president of the World Anti-Doping Agency—an organization that seeks to detect and penalize competitors who would use performance enhancement to artificially inflate their natural endowments. In his current capacity as a figurehead for the IOC, Dick Pound reliably takes on heavy loads and doesn't shrink from hard burdens—even if it means exposing himself to harsh criticism.

That is certainly the case with this announcement. Shortly after Dick Pound's shocking disclosure, Twitter began bursting forth with his name. Supporters of the JOC—who no doubt feel that Tokyo is being shafted in this raw deal—are shooting off sly comments and memes in response. Nonetheless, Dick Pound will not compromise his commitment to the safety of active participants and those who only come to watch.

While the IOC is keeping itself wide open to surprising developments that may arise, the late May deadline provides a flexible barrier that Dick Pound knows is necessary in order to prevent infections from spreading. Where it's possible to thoroughly fill a hole in safety procedures, Dick Pound is the man to fill that hole, but he also knows his limits. Dick Pound will not risk trying to fill every hole in a stadium full of infected people. If that means they don't get to come at all, he will make the hard choice and leave them wanting more.

The important thing in these situations is that no one should be made the victim of unwanted spreading. That's what Dick Pound is working so hard to ensure.

CULTURE

Rush Limbaugh Is a 30-year Infection in American Media

His latest insanity involved claiming that the coronavirus is both "the common cold," and a bio-weapon designed by China.

Bloomberg/Getty Images

There are few people in American media as reliably unhinged and distasteful as Rush Limbaugh.

But to many in his audience of more than 15 million weekly listeners, Limbaugh is a bastion of straight talk. Since the late 1980s, his brand of antisocial advocacy has twisted and infected the nation's political conversations.

What makes Limbaugh so compelling is that he never pulls punches or offers any deference to basic human decency. He will fight for the rights of smokers to choke a restaurant with clouds of thick smoke, will happily claim that Planned Parenthood is committing genocide against black Americans, and will never shrink from accusing Michael J. Fox of "exaggerating the effects" of Parkinson's disease with no evidence beyond the fact that Limbaugh himself can do a morbid pantomime of wild muscle spasms. To regular listeners, these unequivocal stances reflect Rush's willingness to stand up to the leftist authoritarians and the woke scolds of the world. He speaks truth to power… Unless of course Republicans control the levers of power, in which case Rush will speak in power's defense.

Limbaugh mocking Michael J. Fox

That was the case on Monday, when Rush managed to argue—in the span of a few minutes—that COVID-19 (colloquially known as the coronavirus) is both "the common cold," and "a Chicom laboratory experiment that is in the process of being weaponized." Chicom is a reference to China's ruling Communist party, whom Rush is accusing of deliberately manufacturing this new strain of virus as a form of biological warfare. But due to their incompetence or some nefarious ulterior motive that involves getting everyone only mildly ill, their biological weapon is—according to Rush—"the common cold."

As evidence of its mildness, Rush cites the low mortality rate—"98% of people who get the coronavirus survive." Of course, this would seem to undermine the sinister plot that Rush has espied through his omniscience, if not for his clever discovery of Chicom's co-conspirators: the mainstream media. "The drive-by media hype of this thing as a pandemic, as the Andromeda strain, as, 'Oh, my God, if you get it, you're dead.'"

There's no doubt that the media has a history of exaggerating the potential danger of emerging epidemics—ask anyone who had the Swine flu and shrugged it off. It makes for a gripping story to tell viewers that a new disease that's spreading is coming to kill them and their loved ones, but the famously pro-communist "drive-by" media is legitimately too distractible to really focus on overblowing a health crisis while also covering election drama, Megxit, Trump's pardons, and Harvey Weinstein. So if they are giving the coronavirus too much hype, it can only be part of an elaborate conspiracy with Xi Jinping and the Chinese government…but to what end?

COVID-19 Timeline Wikimedia

As always, in times of uncertainty, we turn to Rush Limbaugh for the answer: "The way it is being weaponized is by virtue of the media, and I think that it is an effort to bring down Trump, and one of the ways it's being used to do this is to scare the investors, to scare people in business. It's to scare people into not buying Treasury bills at auctions. It's to scare people into leaving, cashing out of the stock market—and sure enough, as the show began today, the stock market—the Dow Jones Industrial Average—was down about 900 points, supposedly because of the latest news about the spread of the coronavirus."

Fascinating. Meanwhile the fact that nearly 3,000 deaths have occurred—with more than 80,000 confirmed cases and outbreaks spreading in Italy, Iran, South Korea, and Japan—must all be part of the hype. The fact that the virus is wildly contagious and not well understood is part of the hype. The facts that the entire city of Wuhan—with a population of over 11 million—is under strict quarantine and that containment measures throughout China are disrupting office work, manufacturing, and transportation is all part of a clever, convoluted plan to hurt the presidency of Donald Trump. The fact that tourism and travel have dropped off around the world, and that various companies have reported losses as a result of the virus and the measures taken to combat it, it's all just calculated to undermine President Trump's singular metric of success—the surging "economy" embodied in the stock market.

Stock market drop

Because there can't possibly be anything wrong with structuring economic policy entirely around a foundation of volatile investor speculation and a faith in limitless corporate growth. No, the strategy would be perfect if it weren't for the forces of evil aligning against Donald Trump to control global events in a way that hurts his political chances. In that sense, it's only reasonable for President Trump to dangle military aid in front of foreign leaders in exchange for dirt and propaganda against his political rivals. It's the only way he can fight back!

This latest drama comes on the heels of Limbaugh's receipt of the Presidential Medal of Freedom during President Trump's State of the Union Address—an honor which Limbaugh pretended to be surprised by. Some people have criticized the decision to give such a prestigious award to the kind of man who would glibly invent conspiracies about Chinese bio-weapons and downplay the severity of a little-understood contagion. On the other hand, if anyone should know about the dangers of viral respiratory infections—and the deadly pneumonia that can result in people with compromised systems—it's surely Rush Limbaugh. He is, after all, currently being treated for stage four lung cancer and is unlikely to recover.

Rush Limbaugh with a Cigar

That last point is worth restating: Rush Limbaugh most likely will not be with us for much longer. It's an important thought to keep in mind when things seem bleak.

MUSIC

13 Musicians Influenced By Psychedelics

Some wild stories from great musicians who dabbled in hallucinogens.

The story of psychedelics is intertwined with the story of music, and tracing their relationship can feel like going in circles.

For thousands of years, artists have been using naturally-grown herbs to open their minds and enhance their creative processes. Since LSD was synthesized by Albert Hoffman in 1938, psychedelics have experienced a reemergence, blooming into a revolution in the 1960s, launching dozens of genres and sounds that focused on acid, shrooms, and all of the portals they opened. Around the 1960s, scientists also began studying the relationship between psychedelics and music, and even back then, researchers found that, when combined, music and psychedelics could have therapeutic effects on patients.

More modern studies have discovered that LSD, specifically, links a portion of the brain called the parahippocampal—which specializes in personal memory—to the visual cortex, which means that memories take on more autobiographical and visual dimensions. Other studies have found that LSD can make the timbres and sounds of music feel more meaningful and emotionally powerful. Today, psychedelic music still thrives, and you can hear flickers of those early trip-inspired experiences all across today's modern musical landscape.

"There is a message intrinsically carried in music, and under the effects of psychedelics, people seem to become more responsive to this," said the psychedelic researcher Mendel Kaelen. "Emotion can be processed more deeply. It's a beautiful narrative. It's like a snake biting itself in the tail."

All that said, psychedelics can be as dangerous as the archetypal live-fast-die-young rock and roller's average lifestyle. They can destabilize already fragile minds and can encourage further drug abuse and reckless behavior. Often, psychedelic revolutions have coincided with colonialist fetishizations, apocalyptic visions, and appropriations of Eastern culture.

However, sometimes psychedelics and musical talent can come together in a synergy so perfect that it can literally create transcendent and healing experiences. Hallucinogens affected each of these following musicians in a unique way, but their experiences with hallucinogens produced some of the greatest music of all time.

Harry Styles — She

In his revelatory Rolling Stone profile, Harry Styles spoke out about how magic mushrooms inspired his most recent album, Fine Line. Inspired by Fleetwood Mac, the 25-year-old apparently spent a lot of time at Shangri-La Studios in Los Angeles tripping and listening to the old psychedelic greats.

fine line - harry styles (slowed n reverb) www.youtube.com

"Ah, yes. Did a lot of mushrooms here," he said in the interview during a tour of the studio. "We'd do mushrooms, lie down on the grass, and listen to Paul McCartney's Ram in the sunshine."

Things even got a little violent, as they often can when dealing with hallucinogens. "This is where I was standing when we were doing mushrooms and I bit off the tip of my tongue. So I was trying to sing with all this blood gushing out of my mouth. So many fond memories, this place," he reminisced affectionately.

Harry Styles - She (Official Audio) www.youtube.com


Kacey Musgraves — Slow Burn

Kacey Musgraves' dreamy song "Slow Burn" was apparently inspired by an acid trip. Listening to the lyrics, you can hear the influence of psychedelics twining with country and singer-songwriter tropes. "I was sitting on the porch, you know, having a good, easy, zen time," she said of the songwriting experience, which she said happened out on her porch one evening. "I wrote it down on my phone, and then wrote the songs the next day with a sober mind."

Kacey Musgraves - Slow Burnwww.youtube.com

LSD, she said, "opens your mind in a lot of ways. It doesn't have to be scary. People in the professional worlds are using it, and it's starting to become an option for therapy. Isn't that crazy?" Her affection for the drug also appears in her song "Oh What A World," which contains the lyric, "Plants that grow and open your mind."


A$AP Rocky — L$D

While A$AP Rocky's affection for LSD isn't a surprise given his propensity for writing about the drug, apparently the rapper has an intellectual approach to his psychedelic experimentation.

"We was all in London at my spot, Skeppy came through," he told Hot New Hip Hop about his experience writing LSD. "I have this psychedelic professor, he studies in LSD. I had him come through and kinda record and monitor us to actually test the product while being tested on. We did the rhymes all tripping balls."

Apparently his first acid trip happened in 2012. "Okay, without getting anyone in trouble, I was with my homeboy and some trippy celebrity chicks and…" he said in an interview with Time Out. When asked how long it lasted, he said, "Too long, man. Twenty-three hours. I was trippin' till the next day. When I woke up, I was like, Damn! I did that shit! That shit was dope. It was so amazing. It was a-ma-zing. Nothing was like that first time."

Acid changed his entire approach to music and success. "I never really gave a f*ck, man, but this time, I really don't give a f*ck," he said. "I don't care about making no f*cking hits." Instead, he focuses on creating. "It's so hard to be progressive when you're trippin' b*lls," he said. "You make some far-out shit!"

A$AP Rocky - L$D (LOVE x $EX x DREAMS) www.youtube.com


The Beatles — Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds

The Beatles' later music is essentially synonymous with LSD, and the band members often spoke out about their unique experiences with the drug. According to Rolling Stone, the first time that Lennon and Harrison took it was actually a complete accident. A friend put LSD in their coffee without their knowledge, and initially Lennon was furious. But after the horror and panic faded, things changed. "I had such an overwhelming feeling of well-being, that there was a God, and I could see him in every blade of grass. It was like gaining hundreds of years of experience in 12 hours," said Harrison.

Paul McCartney had similar revelations. LSD "opened my eyes to the fact that there is a God," he said in 1967. "It is obvious that God isn't in a pill, but it explained the mystery of life. It was truly a religious experience." Of LSD's effect, he also said, "It started to find its way into everything we did, really. It colored our perceptions. I think we started to realize there wasn't as many frontiers as we'd thought there were. And we realized we could break barriers."

Using the drug not only helped the band create some of the most legendary music of all time—it also brought them closer together. "After taking acid together, John and I had a very interesting relationship," said George Harrison. "That I was younger or I was smaller was no longer any kind of embarrassment with John. Paul still says, 'I suppose we looked down on George because he was younger.' That is an illusion people are under. It's nothing to do with how many years old you are, or how big your body is. It's down to what your greater consciousness is and if you can live in harmony with what's going on in creation. John and I spent a lot of time together from then on and I felt closer to him than all the others, right through until his death."

Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds (Remastered 2009) www.youtube.com


Ray Charles — My World

The soul music pioneer allegedly once described acid as his "eyes." Charles was blind, but LSD is said to have allowed him some version of sight. Though he struggled with addiction, Charles eventually got clean, though his music always bore some markers of his experiences with the subconscious mind.

Actually, blind people on LSD and hallucinogens can experience hallucinations of different kinds, though it's somewhat rare. According to a study in the journal Consciousness and Cognition, this happens because during a trip, "the plasticity of the nervous system allows the recognition and translation of auditory or tactile patterns into visual experiences."

Ray Charles-My World www.youtube.com


Eric Clapton — Layla

Clapton struggled with drug abuse throughout his life, and LSD certainly had an influence on him. While he was a part of Cream, he frequently played shows while tripping, and according to outontrip.com, he became "convinced that he could turn the audience into angels or devils according to the notes he played."

Eric Clapton - Layla www.youtube.com


Chance the Rapper — Acid Rap

Before he was creating the ultimate dad rap, Chance the Rapper was an acidhead.

"None of the songs are really declarative statements; a lot of them are just things that make you wonder...a lot like LSD," said Chance the Rapper of his hallucinogen-inspired album, the aptly named Acid Rap. "[There] was a lot of acid involved in Acid Rap," he told MTV in 2013. "I mean, it wasn't too much — I'd say it was about 30 to 40 percent acid ... more so 30 percent acid."

But the album wasn't merely about acid; like much of the best psychedelic music, it was more about the imagery and symbolism associated with the drug than the actual drug itself. "It wasn't the biggest component at all. It was something that I was really interested in for a long time during the making of the tape, but it's not necessarily a huge faction at all. It was more so just a booster, a bit of fuel. It's an allegory to acid, more so than just a tape about acid," he said.

Chance The Rapper - Acid Rain www.youtube.com


John Coltrane — Om

Jazz great John Coltrane was a regular LSD user who used the drug to create music and to have spiritual experiences. Though he struggled with addiction throughout his life, LSD was one drug that had a major artistic influence on him. While it's not known for sure if the album Om—which includes chanted verses of the Bhagavad Gita—was recorded while Coltrane was on LSD, many rumors theorize that it was.

"Coltrane's LSD experiences confirmed spiritual insights he had already discovered rather than radically changing his perspective," wrote Eric Nisenson in Ascension: John Coltrane and His Quest. "After one early acid trip he said, 'I perceived the interrelationship of all life forms,' an idea he had found repeated in many of the books on Eastern theology that he had been reading for years. For Coltrane, who for years had been trying to relate mystical systems such as numerology and astrology, theories of modern physics and mathematics, the teachings of the great spiritual leaders, and advanced musical theory, and trying somehow to pull these threads into something he could play on his horn. The LSD experience gave him visceral evidence that his quest was on the right track."

John Coltrane - Om ॐ FULL ALBUM www.youtube.com


Jenny Lewis — Acid Tongue

Rilo Kiley frontwoman Jenny Lewis wrote the song "Acid Tongue" about her first and only experience on LSD, which happened when she was fourteen. She told Rolling Stone, "It culminated in a scene not unlike something from Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas—the scene where Hunter S. Thompson has to lock the lawyer in the bathroom. I sort of assumed the Hunter S. Thompson character and my friend – she had taken far too much – decided to pull a butcher knife out of the kitchen drawer and chase me around the house… At the end of that experience, my mom was out of town on a trip of her own and she returned to find me about 5 lbs lighter and I had—I was so desperate to get back to normal I decided to drink an entire gallon of orange juice. I saw that it was in the fridge and decided that this would sort of flush the LSD out of my system, but I didn't realize that it did exactly the opposite."

Acid Tongue - Jenny Lewis www.youtube.com


The Beach Boys — California Girls

The Beach Boys' mastermind Brian Wilson was famously inspired by psychedelics, which both expanded and endangered his fragile and brilliant mind. After his first acid trip in 1965, an experience that he said "expanded his mind," Wilson wrote "California Gurls." After the trip, however, Wilson began suffering from auditory hallucinations and symptoms of schizophrenia, and though he discontinued use of the drug, he continued to hear voices; doctors eventually diagnosed him with the disease. Wilson later lamented his tragic experiences with LSD, stating that he wished he'd never done the drug.

Though it led Wilson on a downward spiral, LSD inspired some of his band's greatest work—namely the iconic Pet Sounds, which launched half a century of "acid-pop copycats."

Beach Boys California Girls www.youtube.com


The Flaming Lips — Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots

The Flaming Lips' "Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots" is widely believed to be the product of lead singer Wayne Coyne's LSD experimentation. This theory is corroborated by the fact that the album's cover features the number 25 (and LSD is also known as LSD-25). They also frequently reference LSD in their music, which includes an album called Finally, the Punk Rockers Are Taking Acid.

More recently, Coyne made an LSD-inspired, NSFW short film with fellow acid-user and friend, Miley Cyrus.

the flaming lips yoshimi battles the pink robots part 1 www.youtube.com


Jimi Hendrix — Voodoo Child

While there is still some general contention on whether Jimi Hendrix hallucinated frequently, nobody really doubts that he did. According to rumors, the legendary musician even used to soak his bandanas in acid before going onstage so the drug would seep through his pores.

Jimi Hendrix 'Voodoo Child' (Slight Return) www.youtube.com

According to one source, Hendrix did more than just play music while tripping. He was also an expert at (of all things) the game of Risk.

"Jimi would play Risk on acid, and I never — and me personally — ever beat him at all," said Graham Nash in an interview. "He was unbelievable at it. He was a military man, you know, he's a paratrooper, and I don't know whether you know that about Jimi, but no one ever beat him at Risk."

Jimi Hendrix Interview [Rainbow Bridge] www.youtube.com


The Doors — The End

Jim Morrison was a documented LSD user, and it eventually led him out of his mind. "The psychedelic Jim I knew just a year earlier, the one who was constantly coming up with colorful answers to universal questions, was being slowly tortured by something we didn't understand. But you don't question the universe before breakfast for years and not pay a price," said John Desmore in Riders on the Storm: My Life With the Doors.

Morrison used many different drugs during his lifetime, but apparently LSD had a special place and he avoided using it while working. "LSD was a sacred sacrament that was to be taken on the beach at Venice, under the warmth of the sun, with our father the sun and our mother the ocean close by, and you realised how divine you were," said Ray Manzarek. "It wasn't a drug for entertainment. You could smoke a joint and play your music, as most musicians did at the time. But as far as taking LSD, that had to be done in a natural setting."

Jim Morrison psychedelic interview www.youtube.com

Morrison himself—a visionary who was also a drug-addled narcissist—was kind of the prototypical 1960s LSD-addled rock star. Alive with visions about poetry and sex but lost in his own self-destruction, he perhaps touched on something of the sublime with his art, but in the end he went down a very human path towards misery and decay.

Like many of these artists' stories, Morrison's life reveals that perhaps instead of using hallucinogens and psychedelics as shortcuts to a spiritual experience, one should exercise extreme caution when exploring the outer reaches of the psyche. When it comes to actually engaging with potent hallucinogens, that might be best left to the shamans, or forgotten with the excesses of the 1960s.

On the other hand, we might do well to learn from the lessons that people have gleaned from hallucinogens over the years—lessons that reveal just how interconnected everything is, that show us that music and memory and nature may just all stem from the same place.

Musicians x Psychedelics open.spotify.com

MUSIC

Emiko Shibamura Struts Her Stuff on 'Akindo Fighter'

Wild and crazy Japanese pop hip-hop.

Emiko Shibamura, who released the music video for her new single "Akindo Fighter," back in March has arrived in epic fashion.

Prior to her foray into pop hip-hop, the 65-year-old rapper was a student who worked for Hitori Saito, one of the wealthiest men in Japan. Soon Shibamura was running most of Saito's business empire, a company called Marukan.

Shibamura, now one of Japan's wealthiest women, owns the deed to a plot of land on the moon, along with a reserved seat on World View's planned first flight to the moon.

At the behest of a vision she had, in which the spirit of a white dragon told her to go to Hollywood and make a music video, Shibamura did just that. The video, directed by Michael Laburt and Daniel Merlot, has more than 1 million hits on YouTube.

EMIKO SHIBAMURA "AKINDO FIGHTER" - OFFICIAL VIDEO youtu.be

"Akindo Fighter" opens on disco flavors embellished with a bubble-gum hip-hop beat, as well as nuances of jazz. A metalcore-like breakdown full of rumbling drums and infuses the tune with a dark energy.

The video, both trippy and wildly entertaining, blends references to Green Acres, The Shining, Sesame Street, the Blue Man Group, and Keeping Up With the Kardashians, as blue-skinned steroid monkeys pop their pecs, shooting smoke and laser beams from their nipples. Meanwhile, Shibamura not only rides the white dragon across the sky but appears in avant-garde outfits sizzling with panache.

Even with all this going on, what's most impressive is that Shibamura can rap.

Follow Emiko Shibamura Facebook | Twitter | Instagram


Randy Radic is a Left Coast author and writer. Author of numerous true crime books written under the pen-name of John Lee Brook. Former music contributor at Huff Post.


POP⚡DUST | Read More...

I'm an Asian Woman on Tinder: An Analysis of My Inbox

Kings Spins Defiance Out of Darkness

Pheeyownah Releases New Euphoric Single: "Gold"

MUSIC

Shawn Mendes Wants to be Bill Murray When He Grows Up

The pop star's new music video for "Lost in Japan" parodies Sofia Coppola's 2003 film "Lost in Translation."

Vevo & Universal

"Let's never come here again because it would never be as much fun," a 17-year-old Scarlett Johansson says to a man three times her age, and I was thinking the same thing, except maybe only the first part.

Released late last night, Shawn Mendes's new music video for "Lost in Japan" takes its plot from the 2003 romantic-comedy film Lost in Translation starring Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson, where a lonely, aging movie star has a foreign love affair with a conflicted newlywed. The prolific Canadian singer-songwriter is the stand in for Murray, which makes the situation less creepy, but doesn't make it less tired.

We start off the video with Mendes driving through the neon-bright streets of Tokyo, where he sees himself on a billboard selling whiskey. Same as the film, he's in town to film a whiskey commercial Dos Equis-style. But while Mendes is many things (wink), he's definitely not the gritty masculine type who drinks scotch, as evidenced by the later scene where he "shaves" his perfectly hairless face.

Shawn Mendes, Zedd - Lost In Japan (Original + Remix) www.youtube.com

The video skims along, featuring most of the iconic shots from the movie, including the oft-parodied picture of Murray in an ugly-but-silky-looking yellow bathrobe. He eyes his love interest in an elevator, played by 13 Reasons Why actress Alisha Boe, and pursues her karaoke-style (as you do in Japan). We are at least treated to a steamy shower scene, however that doesn't last long enough.

"Lost in Japan" is the second official single off Mendes' 2018 self-titled album, and at the end of the day is still fun and catchy. It has Mendes' usual boyhood romantic charm, leaving the tweens screaming and the gays speechless. The video smartly mixes both the original version of the song and the popular remixed version featuring Zedd.

Still, if the shower scene were extended and all the other scenes were taken out, it wouldn't have hurt the video. It may actually have improved it.


Joshua Smalley is a New York-based writer, editor, and playwright. Find Josh at his website and on Twitter: @smalleywrites.



POP⚡DUST | Read More...

VOLK Drops Music Video for 'Honeybee'

PREMIERE | Terry Emm Drops 'Sophia'

RISING STAR | Alberta Drops Buff New Single, 'Jay Walk'n'