CULTURE

The 16 Hottest Male Celebrities Categorized by Type

Usually those unexplored multitudes are just daddy issues and a preference for foot stuff, but the joy is in the journey of finding out.

You may not be able to define in words what exactly makes a person attractive, but you know it when you see it.

Of course, there is a huge difference between what makes Justin Beiber hot and what makes Bill Nye the Science Guy hot (don't judge, we don't kink-shame in this household). For those of us who find men attractive—god help us—the question of attractiveness is particularly complicated. Why Matt Bomer is hot is a simple enough question (he looks like a naughty Ken Doll who has more than plastic beneath his trunks), but things get more nuanced when you consider why leagues of real human beings with eyes find Benedict Cumberbatch attractive or why women regularly throw their panties at Post Malone.

To help you through the haunted, endless maze of human sexuality, Popdust has broken down all the types of hot a man can be. Chances are, every man you've ever been attracted to falls into one of these categories.


"Want to Build a Life With Him" Hot

Example: Randall Park

randall park Randall Park

This is the kind of guy you want to take home to your mother. Sure, the sex is only okay, but what does that matter when you wake up every morning to homemade pancakes? This isn't the type of guy you fantasize about f**king on the kitchen floor, this is the kind of guy whose eyes you picture filling with tears when you buy your first home together. He's not exactly a daddy, but he would make a great literal daddy.

"Church Boy" Hot

Example: Tom Holland

tom holland hot Avengers Infinity War film premiere Arrivals Los Angeles USA 23 Apr 2018 Jen Lowery/SilverHub/REX/Shutterstock

Something about this guy's small-town haircut and innocent, sunny smile makes you want to corrupt the sh*t out of him. He always looks a little shocked when you make a dirty joke, but you just know that with some intervention from the devil (you) you'd have that perfectly gelled hair mussed in no time. But also...some small part of you wants to let him make you a better person??? A very small part. Mostly, you just want to ruin his life.

"Rearrange My Guts" Hot

Example: Jason Momoa

Jason Momoa hot

You don't want this guy to take you to a nice dinner at a trendy restaurant—you want him to eat take-out off your ass and throw you around like a rag doll. Sure, he probably has thoughts in his head and a personality and interests and blah blah blah LOOK AT THOSE ARMS. This is the kind of guy you want to spend 72 hours in bed with every 4-6 months but otherwise never see. This is the kind of guy you agree to go camping with despite hating the outdoors because you just love watching him pitch a tent (yes, that was a double entendre, you filthy minx).

"Got Your Teenage Sister Pregnant, but You Kind of Get It" Hot

Example: Norman Reedus

Norman Reedus Norman Reedus

Okay, not literally!!! (maybe literally). But you know that kind of smarmy guy who works at the gas station and says borderline-inappropriate things to you every time you see him? But for some reason, you just can't summon feminist rage about it and instead sorta giggle and blush and wonder what his tobacco-stained fingers would feel like pulling your hair? Yeah, that guy. He's a good-for-nothing, uneducated, creepy, grungy, loser...and that kind of works for you.

"You Knew He Would Be Weird in Bed" Hot

Example: Lenny Kravitz

Lenny Kravitz

So he's super hot in all the traditional ways, from facial structure to swagger, but there's also something a little...extra. Something about him that's...unhinged. Some kind of mad twinkle in his eye that speaks of unexplored multitudes. In most cases, those multitudes are just daddy issues and a preference for foot stuff, but the joy is in the journey of finding out.

"Burnout" Hot

Example: Vince Vaughn

vince vaughn

He's not a bad looking guy—maybe a little chubby, maybe a little bald—but there's something about him that makes it clear he led his high school football team to the state semi-finals in 1984. That thing is that he brings it up...constantly. He still has the overblown confidence of a muscle-bound 18-year-old but with none of the muscle or youth.

"In Context" Hot (e.g. like a high school women's lacrosse coach)

Example: Beto O'rourke

beto o'rourke Beto O' Rourke AP

In most situations, this guy isn't going to turn many heads. But put him on a public school field with 23 hormone-ridden 16-year-olds running laps, and you've got yourself an absolute sex magnet. Alternatively, put him in a political race populated by old, saggy, white people, and suddenly his ability to tuck in his shirt over his gut seems exceptional.

"Ugly" Hot

Example: Benedict Cumberbatch

benedict cumberbatch

This is a broad but important category that this reputable publication has dwelled on seriously for quite some time. An ugly hot guy has an appearance that falls outside the boundaries of conventional attractiveness. Maybe he has a weird horse face or limbs that flail like a carwash's inflatable man in heavy wind (think Pete Davidson). But if you take all of his objectively unattractive features and put them together, somehow, it just works.

"Ascot/Take Me on a Yacht" Hot

Example: Patrick Dempsey

patrick dempsey Patrick Dempsey attending the world premiere of Bridget Jones's Baby at the Odeon cinema, Leicester Square, London. Alamy Stock Photo

This is better than just being rich—it's looking rich. This is ascot hot. This guy's actual God-given looks are largely irrelevant because money made him his own God. He has the money and time to ensure his hair, skin, and clothes are flawless in a "Who me? I just rolled out of bed like this…" kind of way. If this is your type, it's fine, we get it. There's something about being attracted to a Republican that feels so deliciously...deplorable.


"Ready To Risk It All" Hot

Example: Idris Elba

Idris Elba

This is the kind of hot you leave your husband for. This is the kind of hot you leave your wife for. This is the kind of hot you sell your house for. This is the kind of hot you pretend to like his DJ set for. Is the sex good? It literally doesn't matter, just look at him.

"Party Boy" Hot

Example: Colin Farrell

colin farrell

Does he have a substance abuse problem? Probably. Is he reliable? Not at all. Do any of his values align with yours? Absolutely not. Is he a great f**king time? Oh yeah. This guy probably has one of those annoyingly hot side smiles, maybe a kind of hard-to-understand accent, and the sex is probably kind of like being mauled by a drunk bear but in a good way. He probably has an earring he doesn't remember getting but kind of pulls it off. It goes without saying that your Dad hates him.

"Baby" Hot

Example: Timothée Chalamet

timothee chalamet

This is a complicated category. He makes your uterus ache, but you can't tell if that's sexual arousal or your biological clock ticking. You can't decide if you want to take a bath with him or give him a bath. Either way, you definitely wanna smooch that sweet lil face.


"Artist/Vegan" Hot

Example: Harry Styles

harry styles hot

He is comfortable with his feminine side, and he wants you to know it. You wanna argue with him about the fallacy of placing the responsibility for climate change on the shoulders of individuals when a handful of corporations are ultimately responsible—but he has those puppy dog eyes, so you just give in and agree to give up plastic straws. His slam poetry competitions are cringe-worthy, but he just looks so good in ripped Levi's and a beanie.

"Wouldn't Be Surprised if He Turned Out to Be a Serial Killer" Hot

Example: Rami Malek

rami malek Hollywood Foreign Press Association Annual Grants Banquet, Arrivals, Los Angeles, USA - 09 Aug 2018 John Salangsang/BFA/REX/Shutterstock

He speaks, acts, and behaves like a robot who has heard about the behavior of human beings but never actually seen it. There's something magnetic about his strangeness, and suddenly the legacy of Ted Bundy makes sense to you. Everything about him is subtly unsettling, but personality disorders aside....he could get it.


"Stoner" Hot

Example: Seth Rogan

seth rogan GQ

He only chuckles at your jokes but cries laughing when his gamer buddy says something about farts. He always needs a haircut, has stains on his shirt, and probably smells faintly of Doritos. Still, something about his anti-establishment,"being handsome is mainstream" attitude does it for you.

"Garbage" Hot

Example: Post Malone

post malone

This one comes with a lot of justified self-loathing. Just do better.

MUSIC

Weathers Come Into Their Own

The up-and-coming LA boy band talks night drives, inspirations, and the redemptive experience that is a concert where musicians and fans can come together and bond over the shared emotions at the core of being alive.

Weathers have a lot going for them. On February 7th, the four-piece LA-bred band of mostly newly minted 21-year-olds lit up Brooklyn's Knitting Factory with their tightly wound pop-rock, which takes notes from the 1975, M83, and Cage the Elephant while adding its own flavors of millennial existentialism. It's the kind of music that you can dance all night to or blast on a long drive while contemplating the inner workings of human existence. Their introspective lyrics spread the message that it really is okay not to be okay, while infectious drumbeats touch upon on the kind of stylization that's launched boy-bands before them to stratospheric stardom.

Popdust met up with them before the show to talk about night drives, inspirations, and the redemptive experience that is a concert where musicians and fans can come together and bond over the shared emotions at the core of being alive.

POPDUST: You've said you felt you underwent a big change after releasing your first music. What kind of change was it—was it a personal or sonic thing?

CAMERON BOYER: All of the above. You can hear it in our older stuff like "Happy Pills" and "I Don't Wanna Know." We were babies when that stuff came out, fresh out of high school, and we felt like we were someone else's project. After "Happy Pills," we decided to take some time off and wrote music for like a year and a half—which was terrifying, because a major label had signed us and we were telling them, hey, we're gonna change our sound.

That period led to Kids in the Night, which we feel like is a good representation of who we are as people, and will be for a long time.

POPDUST: What caused those changes?

Early on we had this rule where all the songs had to be dark and kind of creepy. But over time, we all kind of realized that we didn't want to flounder around in our darkness, if that makes sense; it's not a fun place to be all the time, especially creatively. We still wanted to have some of those darker tones lyrically, but we also wanted to have fun onstage and let loose and have the music reflect a new, more positive attitude while still keeping who we are through our lyrics.

POPDUST: Is there any specific role you imagine your music playing in people's lives?

CAMERON OLSEN: It could be pretty cool to have kids that listen to us now feel like, hey, Weathers was the soundtrack of our high school experience.

Weathers - Problems (Video) www.youtube.com


POPDUST: Your song 1983 is a love letter to driving in cars, which is such a classic teenage experience. Do you have any favorite car songs?

CB: Nightcall by Kavinsky. It was my number one most listened to track of 2017, I think.

BRENNAN BATES: Night House by Joywave was one of my recent favorites. It's very much a driving song—as well as Outcast by Mainland.

CB: Somebody Else by the 1975 is great too, and Midnight City by M83 is a go-to. I read that they wrote that song specifically based on the feeling of driving through Los Angeles at night.

Kavinsky - Nightcall (Drive Original Movie Soundtrack) (Official Audio) www.youtube.com

POPDUST: Can you talk a bit about your songwriting process? Who comes up with what?

COLE CARSON: Usually there's someone on a computer who's creating the base of a track, and on top of that we start humming melodies, and once we have a track and a vibe we add lyrics.

CO: A lot of Problems was created outside, without instruments, playing catch with a football—we just came up with a concept and lyrics.

CB: Olsen and I worked together on the album, but we've also been writing a lot together as a group.

POPDUST: I love how you guys often emphasize honesty in your songwriting and interviews, especially with mental health. Why is honesty important to you, and what's its role in your music?

CB: If you're not honest with yourself, then who are you? You have to be honest with yourself if you're going to create anything, otherwise it's all going to feel fabricated.

BB: Honesty is a huge part of communication in any kind of relationship, with a loved one or a fan or a friend. Creating this music and building that connection with people is a different kind of communication to harvest, and honesty is a huge part of that.

POPDUST: You've written songs about very personal themes. Is it ever difficult to perform them, or do you find it cathartic?

CB: The only song that gets tough to sing is Secret's Safe with Me; that one's really personal. It's not actually about me—it's about someone else—so that gets tough.

CC: Most of it feels pretty natural. We're proud of the things we've been through that make us who we are. Everybody is going through similar stuff, so it's pretty rad that we can go up there and be like, we're exactly the same.

CB: The first time we ever played any of these songs live was when we headlined the Troubador. Seeing people singing I'm Not Ok, we got that feeling that they're all probably singing about something totally different—but it's helping them just as much as it's helping us.

Weathers - Secret's Safe With Me (Audio) www.youtube.com

POPDUST: Have you had any especially meaningful interactions with fans?

CB: There's a fan who's printing out pictures and stickers to post around Vegas before our first headline show there, and other fans that are making T-shirts for us.

CC: Some fans have gotten tattoos of songs that meant a lot to them.

CO: Someone got Shallow Water, and someone got Take In the View from 1983.

CB: Someone last night asked me to write Nice 83 Vibe on a napkin so they could get it tattooed.

POPDUST: That must be wild—knowing something that you wrote will be on someone's body for the rest of their life.

So you just released a song called Dirty Money. Does that come from a place of personal frustration with capitalism, or is it about something else?

CB: The song has nothing to do with money at all, believe it or not… When you're in a band and you're young and you've got fans, it's easy to lose yourself a bit. The song's about battling egoes and the inner demons that come with being in the industry.

Dirty Money (Visualette) www.youtube.com

POPDUST: Has it been difficult to maintain a sense of self? Have you felt any disjointedness between who you are performing and backstage, or is the transition more fluid?

CB: Onstage is the only place I feel like I get to really let loose. Otherwise, I'm usually pretty quiet or awkward, I don't know. It's really only onstage that I let go.

CC: When I'm onstage I'm definitely a lot crazier than in person.

CB: You really let it shine through the playing of the drums. You let the music do the talking.



Eden Arielle Gordon is a writer and musician from New York City. Follow her on Twitter at @edenarielmusic.


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FILM & TV

What Blade Runner 2049 teaches us about humanity

What does Blade Runner 2049 teaches us about the nature of humanity?

Warner Bros.

What, exactly, does it mean to be human anymore?

In most cases, these shows and films explore futures where human bodies are invaded and discarded for some type of material gain, and in most cases, the bodies experiencing invasion are those of women.

When Ridley Scott's original Blade Runner was released in 1982 the film received lukewarm box office reviews, and was later praised by film theorists and critics for its sci-fi noir depiction of replicated human slaves in a grungy, far-off future. Denis Villeneuve's Blade Runner 2049 faced a similar slow-burn in movie sales, with critics not entirely sure if the film was a sequel, a stand alone film, or a cash grab to revive a movie franchise that barely had any mainstream momentum from the start.

So, what gives? Why didn't Ryan Gosling as K, a solemn, heartthrob blade runner not bring in more moviegoers? Do people no longer care about sci-fi films and Ryan Gosling's face, or is the abject horror of being replaced by replicant humans with superhuman strength and intellect no longer a threat to the average American with Trump in office?

The truth of the matter is that Blade Runner 2049 is an excellent movie—with or without soaring box office numbers—that is a patient and evocative study on the human condition and the nature of human connection.

Ryan Gosling as K (Warner Bros.)

Villeneuve and producers went out of their way to protect the secret mystery of his sequel, but it's not as juicy as you'd suspect: replicants are capable of reproducing and are therefore full-fledged beings with agency and power. This places mankind and replicants in a sticky situation since those only "born" have a soul—or at least that's what we humans have been told.

What unfolds is a poetic exploration of the small stories humans tell ourselves to keep moving forward, how we are wired to pull from our pasts to build the fabric of our futures. The original Blade Runner focused on the emotional capacities of humans like the ability to love, the ability to develop a moral compass, and the ability to sacrifice yourself for a greater cause. Blade Runner 2049 posits another theory where humans rely on memory and storytelling to build their personhood—replicants have implanted memories designed to construct their inner narratives.

Along the way there are holographic girlfriends who cater to customers' needs, gigantic holographic ads displaying naked women, and rogue "retires" who are fighting in resistance to bioengineered slaved labor.

Ryan Gosling as K (Warner Bros.)

For movie buffs, you may find yourself thinking about David Cronenberg's—the father of body horror—Existenz (1999), or another Ridley Scott picture, Alien (1979), which was met with higher box office numbers than Blade Runner; but more recent comparisons would land on HBO's Westworld and USA's Mr. Robot (of the alienated and despondent variety). In Existenz, gamers connect to a virtual game world through penetration via bio-port (resembling the texture of an umbilical cord) that enables players to experience a virtual simulation involving the transportation of self and consciousness.

David Cronenberg's 'Existenz' (Miramax Films)

Likewise, in Alien, extraterrestrial beings prey on humans to find vessels or "hosts" for their alien offspring. In Westworld, robot's bodies are invaded, abused, and discarded for human pleasure. In most cases, these shows and films explore futures where human bodies are invaded and discarded for some type of material gain, and in most cases, the bodies experiencing invasion are those of women. Body horror is known for exploring the disposable nature of the human body when used as a utility, and the stark realities of human labor (especially in dystopias), but if you're looking for a critique on the use of women's bodies as hosts and holographic girlfriend products, you'll be hard-pressed to find the politics of this exchange in Blade Runner 2049. The tragedy in 2049 isn't the use of women's bodies as a source of labored reproduction and entertainment, but the immaterial nature of memory.

'Westworld' (HBO)

If the human mind is sustained by an interface of memories, both personal memories and fabricated memories (from media, marketing, art, culture, etc.) that alter our perceptions of reality, what exactly are the material realities of our bodies? We are what we eat, or rather, we are what we remember.

My question: is there any future where a woman's agency isn't subject to labor for male pleasure?

Ana de Armas as Joi (Warner Bros.)


Shaun Harris is a poet, freelance writer, and editor published in avant-garde, feminist journals. Lover of warm-toned makeup palettes, psych-rock, and Hilton Als. Her work has allowed her to copyedit and curate content for various poetry organizations in the NYC area.


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