Lorde - Solar Power

Lorde's decision to move away from her moody, neon-drenched sounds of old and into a more buoyant, sunny frame of mind has proven divisive.

Her album Solar Power has received mixed reviews, with some fans missing the gnarly emotional impact of her previous masterpiece, Melodrama.

But there's a subtle kind of magic on Solar Power, similar in its potency to Melodrama but of a different breed. Melodrama had a way of diving into the deep emotional core of human experience — love, terror, horror, high drama.

Instead of re-entering that core and attempting to draw more blood from her heart, on Solar Power Lorde chooses to float around the edges of experience, admiring life from a distance, as if staring down from the sun. She dances in spaces of silence and reflection. She remembers the heat of the past but makes the conscious decision to turn her face away, towards more wide-open vistas.

Keep Reading Show less
New Releases

Premiere: James Worthy Revels in His Obsession on "Tick Tock"

Featuring Big Gipp of Atlanta's Goodie Mob, the new track is Worthy's follow-up to his viral hit "In The Dark"

Tick Tock

Coming off the viral success of his track "In the Dark," James Worthy has returned with "Tick Tock," a slinky bedroom anthem that today is premiering exclusively on Popdust.

The sultry song features a multifaceted guest verse from Goodie Mob's Big Gipp, as Worthy serenades a love interest who has become an obsession. "Pinot grigio 'cause it's your favorite wine, I remember cause you stay on my mind," he croons. When Gipp enters, he drowns his lover in lavish luxury; "rubies, emeralds, and pink stones," he raps. "2021 five hundred with the Benz on it
Taupe ass blue coope, five colors." The duo's chemistry on the track is immaculate as they trade verses as smoothly as a fine wine.

Keep Reading Show less
MUSIC

The Reckoner: Half Waif On "Mythopoetics"

The Hudson Valley-based Half Waif tackles everyday dramas on her new album, Mythopoetics, one of the year's finest.

Sitting before her bright yard in the Hudson Valley on a recent weekday afternoon musician Half Waif ponders the piano that has consoled her since childhood.

Born Ananda "Nandi" Rose in verdant Williamstown, Massachusetts, the artist began playing the instrument at age six and has since leapt from it to craft some of the finest art pop around. Across five albums, starting with 2014's scintillating Kotekan and continuing with the shimmering Mythopoetics that was released just two weeks ago, Half Waif emerges as a true visionary who digs everyday soil and rises with profound gems.

Keep Reading Show less
Music Features

Review: Yung Bleu's "Moon Boy" Showcases a Pop Star In The Making

On Moon Boy, Yung Bleu's debut album, the crooner attempts to balance his dueling personas and ultimately presents a radio-ready project ripe with agenda.

Yung Bleu "Moon Boy"

The infamous Drake co-sign.

It's long been seen as a coveted secret weapon, a guaranteed career kickstarter for any artist lucky enough to snag one. With that said, the Drake feature hasn't always translated into a guaranteed success story. The trajectories of ILoveMakonnen and BlocBoy JB are a testament to that. But a Drizzy verse has always translated into an opportunity for young artists to capitalize on budding attention rather than curate that attention on their own.

Keep Reading Show less

"I wish I could tell myself / don't do it for anyone else," sings Nandi Rose Plunkett on "Party's Over," one of the many bittersweet tracks on her latest release, Mythopoetics.

As Half Waif, Plunkett has been crafting strangely beautiful, buoyant, and sad music for years. With a knack for nimble electronic beats and thought-provoking lyrics, she's always been uniquely talented at capturing the strange sense of being isolated in your own mind while acutely feeling for others. Now, though, she seems to be intent on reclaiming her own sense of personal autonomy.

Keep Reading Show less

Lucy Dacus

Most of us are guided, consciously or unconsciously, by our pasts. Confronting those patterns that we learned as kids takes a lot of bravery, and many people spend their whole lives running from those memories.

But on Home Video, her latest and most ambitious album, Lucy Dacus takes a deep, fearless dive straight into the past. Blending Y2K nostalgia with perspective and wisdom, these songs find Dacus reexamining her youth and her relationships of old, picking them apart in a way that seems designed to transport any listener back to their own teenage years.

Keep Reading Show less