Music Features

Review: Yung Bleu's "Moon Boy" Showcases a Pop Star In The Making

On Moon Boy, Yung Bleu's debut album, the crooner attempts to balance his dueling personas and ultimately presents a radio-ready project ripe with agenda.

Yung Bleu "Moon Boy"

The infamous Drake co-sign.

It's long been seen as a coveted secret weapon, a guaranteed career kickstarter for any artist lucky enough to snag one. With that said, the Drake feature hasn't always translated into a guaranteed success story. The trajectories of ILoveMakonnen and BlocBoy JB are a testament to that. But a Drizzy verse has always translated into an opportunity for young artists to capitalize on budding attention rather than curate that attention on their own.

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"I wish I could tell myself / don't do it for anyone else," sings Nandi Rose Plunkett on "Party's Over," one of the many bittersweet tracks on her latest release, Mythopoetics.

As Half Waif, Plunkett has been crafting strangely beautiful, buoyant, and sad music for years. With a knack for nimble electronic beats and thought-provoking lyrics, she's always been uniquely talented at capturing the strange sense of being isolated in your own mind while acutely feeling for others. Now, though, she seems to be intent on reclaiming her own sense of personal autonomy.

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Lucy Dacus

Most of us are guided, consciously or unconsciously, by our pasts. Confronting those patterns that we learned as kids takes a lot of bravery, and many people spend their whole lives running from those memories.

But on Home Video, her latest and most ambitious album, Lucy Dacus takes a deep, fearless dive straight into the past. Blending Y2K nostalgia with perspective and wisdom, these songs find Dacus reexamining her youth and her relationships of old, picking them apart in a way that seems designed to transport any listener back to their own teenage years.

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Wolf Alice

Wolf Alice's Blue Weekend, out last week, has soared to the top of the UK charts, ousting Olivia Rodrigo's SOUR from the top spot.

This is the London-based band's first number one album (their last two went to number two), and it cements the indie rockers as future megastars.

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Japanese Breakfast

Japanese Breakfast's third album, Jubilee, breaks open with a bang.

The first song, "Paprika," is one of the artist's biggest, brightest songs. It rolls in with a giant crescendo about 30 seconds in, and from there it rides on a buoyant, trumpet-laden beat that marks a stark contrast to the more meditative qualities of the artist's earlier works.

The song, and the album that follows, were created to be a celebration of ecstasy, happiness, and the brighter sides of life. (Ahead of its release, the artist literally tweeted, "This is an album about joy.")

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New Releases

Indie Roundup: Five New Albums to Stream Now

Here's what to listen to this weekend.

David Cortes

If you're anything like us, you're probably overwhelmed by the sheer number of albums being released on a weekly basis.

Popdust's weekly column, Indie Roundup, finds the five best albums coming out each week so that you don't have to. Every Friday, we'll tell you what's worth listening to that might not already be on your radar.

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