Akashic Records

What if you could access a record of everything that ever happened in the past, present, and future? What if it could reveal your true purpose in the universe?

That's the central concept behind the Akashic Records. You may have heard the term if you're immersed in any aspect of the wellness/spiritual realm; or, if the history of the Records is to be believed, perhaps you've come across them if you've studied any ancient religion or esoteric thought system.

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Trueself

An Open Letter to the Aliens: Please Help Us

Humans have failed; is it time for alien saviors to descend?

Dear Aliens,

The Pentagon finally revealed what many of us already suspected: that you exist and you've been orbiting our planet for many years. Who knows how many civilian reports of your passage through our cosmos have been real, only to be written off as hallucinations by the close-minded?

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Breathwork Guide

You've probably been told to "just breathe" before.

But most likely, you haven't tried this kind of breathing—at least, not the kind practiced in most variants of breathwork.

Earlier this week, I spent over an hour breathing deeply and quickly to a trippy prog-rock and world music soundtrack. I used a free sample session provided by Neurodynamic Breathwork Online, a Joshua Tree-based breathwork organization that claims it "changes to your nervous systems by strengthening the neural pathways to your inner intelligence," and "changes your perspective in a powerful way, helping you to realize that you already have all of the answers inside of you."

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Trueself

Pagans, Slashers, and Wall Street Psychos: The True Story of Friday the 13th

Is it bad luck... or just the Christian church's fear of pagans?

Friday the 13th: the very phrase can send a chill (of gleeful excitement or dread, depending on who you are) down the spine. Few days of the year are so notoriously unnerving and so profoundly associated with bad luck. But where did our fear of this date come from, and why does it persist?

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Trueself

Six Poems By Louise Glück, Winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature

The poet received the Nobel Prize in Literature this week.

Louise Glück

For two years, Louise Glück wrote nothing except a single sentence: "At the end of my suffering / there was a door."

Then, Glück wrote her poetry book "The Wild Iris" in mere weeks.

That story—of death that becomes rebirth, of unfathomable pain that generates a sense of the eternal—is one of the many defining themes of Glück's poems. Her poetry is exceptional because it explores the depths of human emotion and suffering in a way that most of us feel, but rarely see reflected back at us in its true forms. There are no walls in Glück's poetry, no holographs: you're seeing the darkness of pure truth.

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Trueself

Taking Back Pride: Black Lives Matter Marches Led by Queer and Trans People Reclaim Pride's Radical Roots

The Brooklyn Liberation March, a protest for Black Trans Lives, was truer to the original spirit and point of Pride than any corporatized Pride march.

This year's truest Pride event so far had no corporate floats and no rainbow flag logos.

It came together in a spirit of rage and defiance. It was the Brooklyn Liberation March, which began at the Brooklyn Museum and wound its way through Brooklyn for hours.

15,000 people, most clad in white, walked in the hot sunshine on June 12th. The march, organized by several Black trans-led organizations, was first conceptualized by a drag queen named West Dakota, who saw hypocrisy in the George Floyd protests erupting around the world that Sumer.

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