Culture Feature

How the Video Game Industry Still Fails to Market to Girls

"Why don't more women play video games?" You're asking the wrong question. Instead, ask: "Why aren't video games marketed towards more females?"

Christmas morning, 1994: I woke up with the sort of excitement most 6-year-old girls do.

But I wasn't excited to find gender-stereotypical presents such as Barbie dolls. I wanted the Sega Genesis video game system. I didn't get it...but my brother did.

I was crushed, but not surprised. My brother and I shared an equal love for playing video games; but the conundrum was that I was a girl—and in the early '90s, people weren't accustomed to video games being a girl's thing.

Skip forward 26 years later, and as a mother of two girls, I've realized that not much has changed.

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Film Features

Before Its Time: 1996's "Romeo + Juliet"

Baz Luhrmann's 1996 Romeo + Juliet is an ecstasy-infused, colorful retelling of the star-crossed lovers' tale that takes a 425-year-old story and strangely reflects society in 2020.

Pandemics are known for triggering upheaval and societal change.

It's probably no coincidence, then, that Shakespeare penned Romeo and Juliet around 1595—directly in the middle of the deadly Bubonic plague pandemic that ravaged Europe. Amidst today's pandemic, the most relevant adaptation of this timeless and classic tragedy was made nearly 25 years ago.

Baz Luhrmann's 1996 Romeo + Juliet is an ecstasy-infused, colorful retelling of the star-crossed lovers' tale. Romeo + Juliet made a decent ranking at the box office, but it was heavily overlooked for awards, only receiving one Oscar nomination for best art direction.

Had Luhrmann waited just 10 years to release Romeo + Juliet, there may have been more positive reactions to the film. At one point, Baz himself doubted that the movie would ever be made. During a 2015 interview discussing the film, Baz said: "When we went to Twentieth Century-Fox with it, under the terms of my first-look deal, I think rather than let me go, they sort of said, 'We'll give him $100,000, let him do his little workshop and maybe it'll go away.' Well it did not."

Romeo + Juliet takes a 425-year-old story and strangely reflects society in 2020. Here's why:

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Culture Feature

Every Conspiracy Theory About the Creator of Bitcoin, Satoshi Nakamoto

One of today's greatest mysteries: Who is the real "Satoshi Nakamoto," the pseudonym for Bitcoin's creator? The conspiratorial rabbit hole resembles a Dan Brown novel or a mind-bending Netflix docuseries.

While cryptocurrency has only been in operation for the past 11 years, the ideals behind the digital peer-to-peer money system have been around for decades.

In 1982, computer scientist David Chaum was the first known person to discuss the concepts of cryptocurrency. But it wasn't until Halloween day 2008 that Satoshi Nakamoto would publish the original Bitcoin blueprint (known as the whitepaper), which laid out the blueprint for a peer to peer electronic cash system.

Three months later, Nakamoto officially launched the first cryptocurrency when he mined "block 0," which created the first blockchain. Nakamoto continued to work on the development of Bitcoin until 2011 when he stepped away from the project and seemingly vanished from existence.

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This past Monday, a panel of physicians for the WNBA denied Elena Delle Donne, of the Washington Mystics, her health exemption request to sit out this season inside the Florida bubble, despite her being at high risk for health complications due to her Lyme Disease.

Delle Donne published an emotional essay for The Players' Tribune in which she opens up about her battle with chronic Lyme disease and her feelings of betrayal by the league that she cares for tremendously.

Elena Delle Donne was diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12 years ago. Although Lyme is usually treated and cured within a few weeks, some people, like Elena, suffer from post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). Although little is known about what causes PTLDS, it is known to trigger an auto-immune response. For someone like Delle Donne, even the common cold could turn into something far more lethal.

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