Music Reviews

Slow Dakota's Tornado Mass for Synthesizer & Voice is not a conventional album, but because of that, it might be especially well-suited to this current moment in time.

During this pandemic, the vast dissonances between our respective experiences as humans are being cast into stark relief. As some linger at home, others wait for unemployment or loan checks that have actually been cast straight into the arms of big businesses. Some insist that this is a time of rebirth and collective unity, others politicize and pontificate, others know only devastation or return to its front lines over and over.

Keep Reading Show less
Music Reviews

Drake's "Dark Lane Demo Tapes" Is Plain and Undistinguished

Aubrey Graham's latest mixtape isn't groundbreaking in any way, but it's not meant to be.

To criticize Drake is to open a can of worms.

At the end of the decade, Drake was trailed by many qualms. From the mounting accusations of cultural appropriation to his overall tentative response regarding his responsibilities as a father to his overabundant use of ghostwriters. In an incredibly candid interview with Rap Radar at the end of the decade, Drake mostly cleared everything up. He's generally a man of few words, so to hear him speak in frank detail about the subjects polluting his otherwise indestructible career was refreshing. Then as Drake does, he sank back into his posh mansion and began churning out music.

Keep Reading Show less
Music Reviews

Review: "Blame It on Baby" Proves DaBaby Is a One-Trick Pony

The rappers third outing rarely ventures into new territory

When DaBaby's debut project dropped in March of last year, the Charlotte rapper was one of the most talked-about talents in Hip-Hop.

Tough as a wrecking ball, his spit-fire lyricism decimated everything in sight with laser-focused precision. "Suge" was a particular standout. Jonathan Lyndale Kirk, spit callous phrases about violence and sex with the sincerity of a pastor. As a result, his fans are devoted, they memorize the emcees every word as if it's religious scripture. He also offered fans comedic relief. He appeared at 2017's SXSW wearing nothing but a diaper, and during a performance at 2019's Rolling Loud, he threw bags of fake weed into the audience just for kicks. His music videos were equally juvenile. In "Babysitter," DaBaby and Offset, under the guise of a late 90s family sitcom, loosely star as irresponsible children who try to have sex with their new babysitter.


Keep Reading Show less
© 2020 Popdust Inc. All Rights Reserved.